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TAMC

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  1. 30+ last year and probably the last 20 or so years. I expect to do 30+ this year too. I have to say last year was the first year I can remember that I didn't enjoy most of the games. Last year was also the first year I didn't try to watch every game on TV if I wasn't there in person. There was something about last year that was just plain bad, far more than just the record. I look forward to losing with a team that doesn't have that "something" even if I can't say exactly what it was.
  2. I don't think the pace of the game is the underlying problem. Of course, that is an opinion based on my experience living where I do. I think that to enjoy baseball, either a 2 hour version or a 3 hour version, you have to have a basic understanding of the game so that you can appreciate the nuances and undercurrents as the game goes along. I know that football is like that and I suspect other games are also. Today kids are in a large number of activities with parents rushing from one activity to another. As a result, even those kids who play Little League or other leagues only play baseball at scheduled practice times and the rest of their lives they are at other organized activities. I see lots of kids who play a little bit of baseball, never learn much about it, and quit when they are 7 or 8, with a few not even knowing to run to first instead of third when they hit the ball. This is not a rant against current lifestyles, I just think the attendance problem in baseball (and other sports soon if not now) is more fundamental than small rule changes can address. That being the case, I would vote for leaving the game alone. I have always heard baseball being praised for the perfect balance between the distance to bases, the speed of players, and the time to field and throw a ball. I like the idea of players being forced to at least try to guide hits -- not only to beat a shift but also to hit behind a runner, execute a hit and run, etc. Just another old codger I guess.
  3. I am interested for the reason above, but I will say that losing baseball doesn't have to be crappy baseball. I am reasonably entertained when players who aren't really ready for MLB are playing sound defense, making intelligent decisions, etc. but just don't quite have the moxie to beat the good teams. The present spectacle is what I call crappy. Multiple errors each game, stupid baseball decisions, etc.
  4. Maybe you and I can get antique license plates for ourselves instead of our cars. 😉
  5. I think we are forced to take the long view. DD and AM inherited a failed system. The major league team was terrible and the minor league teams were largely bare to projectable talent. If we were a business we would have been in bankruptcy. We were like a business without many assets and no credit. Over the past several years we have seen our GMs slowly pull us up from that point. Today our major league team is competing much more successfully, but achieving that condition has involved using almost all the assets from the minors to obtain players who are credible, but not stars and hoping our draft choices come through big time. We have improved our overall situation steadily but slowly over the past few years -- much like any of us with marginal credit and only a little cash could do. We have a long way to go to be completely healthy, but I do think we are demonstrating some positive momentum and, as with money, as our assets grow we will be able to get in on better deals and the rate of growth in total assets will increase. I think that point of accelerated growth is a few years away and the moves of any off season have to be evaluated with restraint. That said, of course, we will always have a large scope for disagreement on particular decisions.
  6. I have four tickets on the aisle in Section 17 Row 11 for the September 3rd game and parking in K/L. I would like to be sure these get to Orioles fans. If you are interested, PM me and/or reply to this thread.
  7. One way to achieve that is to change from a rule-oriented system to a goal-oriented system. You identify what results you want a person to demonstrate and judge success or failure by whether those results are demonstrated. That does not say that a person shouldn't get advice and assistance in achieving the stated goals, but the result should be the bottom line, not following a set of rules. (Obviously not talking about laws, morals, etc. here, but job performance.)
  8. Seems to me Drungo's methodology is more like an assessment of what a rational team might offer rather than a prediction of what will actually be offered. Of course the $7 million number includes historical data about how teams have valued a certain level of production in the past, so it is not completely off the wall in terms of assessing likely contract offers. The value assessment on what a team should pay is more in the idea of the length of a contract where it is assumed that a team will not offer a contract that projects to go beyond the time when a player's performance drops below an easily replaceable level.
  9. 6. Money will be available to buy (in one form or another) additional/different players. Possible conclusions 1. Front office will completely waste the money (or not spend much of it) -> bad 2016 2. Front office buys wisely, but it's not enough -> 81 plus or minus 10 or so 3. Front office buys wisely and most perform to norm -> 85-90 competetive but no guarentees 4. Front office buys wisely and some overachieve on the field -> playoffs I don't know which will happen. One can either be pessimestic or optimistic about the variables. No one will know until it's over.
  10. I have 4 tickets in a 29 game plan and have had for more than 20 years. I would not have 4 tickets if the price doubled. I would have to question it if there were a 20% rise or so. I don't know where my cutoff would be, but there is one well before double.
  11. All those little children I saw last weekend wearing NYY gear. What are their parents thinking?:laughlol:
  12. I am a Cowboy fan, even though I live in a DC suburb. I grew up in Texas and moved here as an adult. Baseball in Texas when I grew up was the Fort Worth Cats -- at a distance of over 100 miles. Went to Texas A&M, so no allegiance to local college teams, although I follow the Terps and Hoyas in basketball. I actually had never seen a professional baseball game live until I moved up here and attended an Orioles game. Instant convert and the Nats never had a chance. Guess I came from a dysfunctional childhood. Sorry about that.
  13. We were there for both games yesterday and will be there today. I think we are annoying them and that is entertaining in itself.
  14. I had a good view of the fielder and the runner. I thought Hardy was dead unless there was a bad throw. Ball was not hit very deep, fielder coming in and lined up with the plate. On the other hand, Hardy was fully extended and making pretty good speed (for Hardy). All in all, though, my thought as the play developed was that Hardy was dead meat unless there was a bad throw/missed catch or tag. But, what do I know? Bad throws happen, after all.
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