OFFNY

Happy 68th Birthday, John Lowenstein

22 posts in this topic

Brother Low has gotta be one of the most beloved Orioles of all-time. He may not have been a superstar but the fans loved him...

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For many of us Oriole fans, our most memorable moment of John Lowenstein's career was when he hit the game-winning, pinch-hit, walk-off home run in the bottom of the 10th inning of Game One of the 1979 A.L.C.S. against the California Angels.

But John had a long, distinguished overall career, as well.

Sandwiched in between two lengthy tenures with the Cleveland Indians and the Baltimore Orioles, Lowenstein played one season for the Texas Rangers in 1978.

His best season offensively was in 1982, when he hit 24 HR's and 66 RBI's in only 384 plate appearances, to go along with a .315 batting average and .415 on-base percentage.

Lowenstein had some speed, too. He stole 36 bases for the Indians in 1974, the only season in which he started a full season (140 games, 574 plate appearances.)

Defensively, Lowenstein had 2 distinctions, 10 years apart.

In 1972, even though he only played in 68 games, he led the American League in double plays turned as a rightfielder (3.)

In 1982, he led the American League in fielding percentage for all outfielders (1.000).

In addition to playing in two World Series in 1979 and 1983, Lowenstein had 881 career hits, 116 career home runs, and stole 128 bases. Although he had a modest career batting average (.253), and on-base percentage (.337), he shined brightest when he played for the Orioles, where his batting average over 7 seasons between 1979 and 1985 was .274, and his OBP was .365.

http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/l/lowenjo01.shtml

Wherever you are, I hope all is well with you, Johnny. :)

One final bump before the mods send this to the "Orioles History" section.

And, thank you everybody for all of your comments in the thread.

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Found it. Around the 2:30 mark.

[video=youtube;y7wy-pZQpec]

I'll have to do a YouTube search for this when not at work, but classic Lowenstein was the time he ran into the outfield wall chasing a long fly ball and appeared to have knocked himself unconscious. One of the few times I've ever seen a stretcher taken onto the field. He really seemed badly hurt. The trainer and other staff carried his limp body from deep RC to the dugout. And just as they were about to go down the steps he sat up on the stretcher and raised both arms over his head to a huge ovation. Edit: It appears he was actually hit by a thrown ball as a baserunner... but the rest is more-or-less right.
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o

For many of us Oriole fans, our most memorable moment of John Lowenstein's career was when he hit the game-winning, pinch-hit, walk-off home run in the bottom of the 10th inning of Game One of the 1979 A.L.C.S. against the California Angels.

But John had a long, distinguished overall career, as well.

Sandwiched in between two lengthy tenures with the Cleveland Indians and the Baltimore Orioles, Lowenstein played one season for the Texas Rangers in 1978.

His best season offensively was in 1982, when he hit 24 HR's and 66 RBI's in only 384 plate appearances, to go along with a .315 batting average and .415 on-base percentage.

Lowenstein had some speed, too. He stole 36 bases for the Indians in 1974, the only season in which he started a full season (140 games, 574 plate appearances.)

Defensively, Lowenstein had 2 distinctions, 10 years apart.

In 1972, even though he only played in 68 games, he led the American League in double plays turned as a rightfielder (3.)

In 1982, he led the American League in fielding percentage for all outfielders (1.000).

In addition to playing in two World Series appearances in 1979 and 1983, Lowenstein had 881 career hits, 116 career home runs, and stole 128 bases. Although he had a modest career batting average (.253), and on-base percentage (.337), he shined brightest when he played for the Orioles, where his batting average over 7 seasons between 1979 and 1985 was .274, and his OBP was .365.

http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/l/lowenjo01.shtml

Wherever you are, I hope all is well with you, Johnny. :)

Happy birthday again, John Lowenstein.

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On 1/27/2015 at 0:01 AM, OFFNY said:

o

For many of us Oriole fans, our most memorable moment of John Lowenstein's career was when he hit the game-winning, pinch-hit, walk-off home run in the bottom of the 10th inning of Game One of the 1979 A.L.C.S. against the California Angels.

But John had a long, distinguished overall career, as well.

Sandwiched in between two lengthy tenures with the Cleveland Indians and the Baltimore Orioles, Lowenstein played one season for the Texas Rangers in 1978.

His best season offensively was in 1982, when he hit 24 HR's and 66 RBI's in only 384 plate appearances, to go along with a .315 batting average and .415 on-base percentage.

Lowenstein had some speed, too. He stole 36 bases for the Indians in 1974, the only season in which he started a full season (140 games, 574 plate appearances.)

Defensively, Lowenstein had 2 distinctions, 10 years apart.

In 1972, even though he only played in 68 games, he led the American League in double plays turned as a rightfielder (3.)

In 1982, he led the American League in fielding percentage for all outfielders (1.000).

In addition to playing in two World Series in 1979 and 1983, Lowenstein had 881 career hits, 116 career home runs, and stole 128 bases. Although he had a modest career batting average (.253), and on-base percentage (.337), he shined brightest when he played for the Orioles, where his batting average over 7 seasons between 1979 and 1985 was .274, and his OBP was .365.

http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/l/lowenjo01.shtml

Wherever you are, I hope all is well with you, Johnny. :)

 

o

 

Happy 70th, John. 

 

 

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