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Passing Players Through Waivers - August Trades

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I assume we have started this process already. I believe I would have had Ubaldo on at 4:01pm Monday. Is there anyway to know who clears and who doesn't? Also, how long do you have to wait? Is it 24 hours?

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I assume we have started this process already. I believe I would have had Ubaldo on at 4:01pm Monday. Is there anyway to know who clears and who doesn't? Also' date=' how long do you have to wait? Is it 24 hours?[/quote']

Zero chance anyone claims Ubaldo.

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I assume we have started this process already. I believe I would have had Ubaldo on at 4:01pm Monday. Is there anyway to know who clears and who doesn't? Also' date=' how long do you have to wait? Is it 24 hours?[/quote']

How long do you have to wait for what?

Most players will be placed on waivers and we won't know about 90% of them.

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How long do you have to wait for what?

Most players will be placed on waivers and we won't know about 90% of them.

That's what I wondered. So they don't announce them, unless I guess someone claims them, hey?

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http://www.mlbtraderumors.com/2016/08/how-august-trades-work-2.html

How August Trades Work

Now that the August 1 trade deadline has passed, teams can still make trades, only with more restrictions than before. Here’s a look at how August trades work.

...

After the “trade deadline” — typically July 31st, but August 1st this year — a big-league player must pass through revocable waivers before his team can trade him without restriction. These waivers last 47 hours. If no one claims him in that period, his team can trade him anywhere.

If a player is claimed, his team can do one of three things. It can trade the player to the claiming team, revoke the waiver request (in which case the player will remain with his original team), or simply allow the claiming team to take the player and his salary (although a player with no-trade rights can block this from happening).

A recent example of an August trade that developed from a waiver claim was the Twins’ acquisition of Neal Cotts from the Brewers last year. Minnesota claimed Cotts and ultimately got him for a player to be named later or cash. An example of a claim that didn’t result in a trade occurred last year, when an unknown team claimed another Brewers reliever, Francisco Rodriguez. The two sides couldn’t strike a deal, so the Brewers revoked their waiver request, and K-Rod remained in Milwaukee. Examples of teams simply letting players go via revocable waivers are more rare, particularly with big-contract players. That being said, it is always possible; in 2009, the White Sox claimed Alex Rios from the Blue Jays, who simply let him go to Chicago without a trade. The White Sox were thus responsible for all of the approximately $62MM remaining on Rios’ contract.

A team has 48.5 hours to trade a claimed player, and can only negotiate with the team awarded the claim on him.

It’s common for teams to place players on revocable waivers, and their having done so does not necessarily mean they have serious plans to trade them. As Stark points out, teams commonly use waivers of certain players purely as smokescreens to disguise which players they really are interested in trading. In fact, sometimes teams place their entire rosters on waivers.

If more than one team claims a player, priority is determined by worst record to best record in the league of the waiving team, followed by worst record to best record in the other league. For example, if an NL team places a player on revocable waivers, the team with the NL’s worst record will get first priority on claims, followed by every other team in the NL from worst to best, followed by AL teams from worst to best.

If a team pulls a player back from waivers once, it cannot do so again in August. So if a team places a player on waivers for a second time, those waivers will be non-revocable.

Players not on 40-man rosters are eligible to be traded at any time without passing through waivers.

A player on the disabled list can only pass through waivers if his minimum period of inactivity has passed and he is healthy and able to play at his accustomed level.

Teams can still make trades in September, but players acquired after August 31 can’t play in the postseason.

...

Edited by weams

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Wonder if DD has anyone in mind. I'm sure he will be on the lookout for a LHRP. Other than that, I'm not sure.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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That's what I wondered. So they don't announce them' date=' unless I guess someone claims them, hey?[/quote']

Even if a player is ckaimed on revocable waivers, we usually son't hear about it. Most are revoked. We hear about it if the team either trades the player or decides not to revoke the waiver claim... or at least news gets leaked that trade negotiations are going on.

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Of course you put Ubaldo through waivers. And then you hope, beyond hope, that somebody claims him. Because at that point you just got 100% out from under his contract. But don't hold your breathe, nobody would claim him.

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Of course you put Ubaldo through waivers. And then you hope, beyond hope, that somebody claims him. Because at that point you just got 100% out from under his contract. But don't hold your breathe, nobody would claim him.

Nobody is going to claim him and take over that contract.

Wait for him to be DFA, and sign him to a vet minimum deal.

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I dont know why teams arent able to trade guys like Ubaldo more often, example:

Ubaldo is owed 13M this year and 13.5M next year. Which means if we DFA him we eat 26.5M and then another team gets him for the min for this year.

Why couldn't we trade him to a team and save a small amount (I.E. Orioles eat 23M). This saves us 3.5M which if obvioulsy better than a DFA.

For the team that trades for him, they have the benefit of having Ubaldo for about 1M this year and 2.5M next year. This allows them to keep him next year if he shows improvements. thoughts?

Jose Reyes and Olivera may be poor examples due to domestic violence issues, but maybe a guy like Trevor Cahill last year...

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