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11 hours ago, Frobby said:

I guess it depends what you mean by “significant” and “only a few.”   Last year we signed 31 guys who we drafted.   Probably half of those got bonuses of $50 k or more, I’d guess.    Slot money for the 10th round is $131 k.    Some senior signs in the top 10 nevertheless sign for something trivial, but then you get some late rounders signing for a lot.    

Making the 40-man is a huge deal. Those guys get paid $40 k, and then $80 k if they’re on a second year.  

Looks like we have a broken system at a time when MLB is concerned about growing the sport. Why would anyone work for banana republic wages when they could take their education in a lot of cases and get a real career going? Interested in finding out what percentage of A or AA players ever get a sniff of MLB. Seems like MLB is taking kids, holding a carrot over their noses and economically raping them in the process while owners rack in billions. 

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10 minutes ago, birdwatcher55 said:

Looks like we have a broken system at a time when MLB is concerned about growing the sport. Why would anyone work for banana republic wages when they could take their education in a lot of cases and get a real career going? Interested in finding out what percentage of A or AA players ever get a sniff of MLB. Seems like MLB is taking kids, holding a carrot over their noses and economically raping them in the process while owners rack in billions. 

 

I heard it said a couple of times, if you have 10 major league pitching prospects, then you will have 3 major league pitchers.

The chart below is not exactly what you was asking.

But, I found it was interesting:

Quote

2002 through 2006 MLB Drafts

Rounds 1 through10

Year Made it to MLB 10+ WAR 5+ WAR 1+ WAR Neg WAR
2002 108 of 311 16 25 48 37
2003 98 of 307 14 28 41 38
2004 111 of 311 9 17 46 44
2005 112 of 319 10 18 47 40
2006 106 of 316 5 17 37 43
Total 535 of 1564 (41.7%) 54 105 219 202
Avg 107 10.8 21 43.8 40.4

https://www.blessyouboys.com/2013/3/5/3977782/what-are-the-odds-of-making-it-to-the-major-leagues

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54 minutes ago, Roll Tide said:

What makes you say that?  On the surface, he looks like organizational filler, kind of like most of the guys we've gotten this way.

I am looking for some reason the O's may have targeted Wade.   I can't find one.   He'll be 26 in December, just had a very mediocre year in AA and hasn't been ranked among the Rockies top 30 prospects by BA over the last 3 years.    He had decent but underwhelming numbers as a reliever last year.   Maybe I'm missing something.   He looks like a complete non prospect to me.    Wouldn't it be wiser to just dump all of the international slots in one large dump to a team and maybe get a real prospect or player?    I mean, we did pretty well getting Chris Lee with slot money but nothing else worth mentioning.    

Edited by RZNJ

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1 hour ago, Redskins Rick said:

 

I heard it said a couple of times, if you have 10 major league pitching prospects, then you will have 3 major league pitchers.

The chart below is not exactly what you was asking.

But, I found it was interesting:

https://www.blessyouboys.com/2013/3/5/3977782/what-are-the-odds-of-making-it-to-the-major-leagues

There’s a flaw in that chart.    It says that 41.7% of the top ten-rounders make the majors, but their own raw numbers (535 of 1564) shows it’s 34.2%.   And of course, it’s a lot higher in the first round and lower in the tenth.   And way, way lower for the 11th-40th, which is where you find mostly players who didn’t get any significant bonus.

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7 minutes ago, Frobby said:

There’s a flaw in that chart.    It says that 41.7% of the top ten-rounders make the majors, but their own raw numbers (535 of 1564) shows it’s 34.2%.   And of course, it’s a lot higher in the first round and lower in the tenth.   And way, way lower for the 11th-40th, which is where you find mostly players who didn’t get any significant bonus.

LOL, I didnt fact check their numbers, guess I should have.

I was surprised to see the numbers in the 70% range for first rounders on the other charts in that article, but I guess that makes sense, early picks are more likely to make good, as opposed to later rounds.

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21 hours ago, bird watcher said:

It is hard to believe that mlb wouldn't force teams to pay a livable wage given the exclusivity of a draftee.  In my opinion this is an abuse of its anti-trust and exemption.  If unwilling to pay more a free dormitory year round would go a long way toward absolution.  

From a development standpoint having players living and perhaps Training together year round can't hurt either. Professional soccer teams in europe have developmental academies like that. 

Exactly.  Forget the human side of forcing these kids to live on very meager wages, and look at it from a developmental standpoint.  These kids are paid so little they're eating peanut butter and jelly and McDonalds dollar menu.  They are also taking long bus rides, sharing dingy motel rooms, and sleeping at "home" on couches and basements of host families.  Proper diet and sleep are important for regular human beings, but substantially more important for young and growing professional athletes.  Why not increase their wages to something actually livable where they can afford a small apartment and eat decent food?  Furthermore, if they make enough money to not have to work a second job in the offseason then they can focus on training full-time in the winter.  Improved sleep, diet, and exercise should maximize development and performance of your prospects.  With MLB teams looking for any small advantage over their peers, I'm surprised no one has tried this.  

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13 minutes ago, Otter said:

Exactly.  Forget the human side of forcing these kids to live on very meager wages, and look at it from a developmental standpoint.  These kids are paid so little they're eating peanut butter and jelly and McDonalds dollar menu.  They are also taking long bus rides, sharing dingy motel rooms, and sleeping at "home" on couches and basements of host families.  Proper diet and sleep are important for regular human beings, but substantially more important for young and growing professional athletes.  Why not increase their wages to something actually livable where they can afford a small apartment and eat decent food?  Furthermore, if they make enough money to not have to work a second job in the offseason then they can focus on training full-time in the winter.  Improved sleep, diet, and exercise should maximize development and performance of your prospects.  With MLB teams looking for any small advantage over their peers, I'm surprised no one has tried this.  

I believe some of them are not doing as badly as you portray it. Ive seen articles in the post and some of the bowie families are well off, and they come in and take over empty bedrooms from children who have left the nest. I also believe that on game days, the team provides their food.

I remember Ubaldo was on injury rehab at Arberden sprung for lobster as their pre-game meal for the clubhouse, which was significantly better than what they normally had. :)

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3 minutes ago, Redskins Rick said:

I believe some of them are not doing as badly as you portray it. Ive seen articles in the post and some of the bowie families are well off, and they come in and take over empty bedrooms from children who have left the nest. I also believe that on game days, the team provides their food.

I remember Ubaldo was on injury rehab at Arberden sprung for lobster as their pre-game meal for the clubhouse, which was significantly better than what they normally had. :)

We have a poster here, Oldorioles, who hosts players at Aberdeen.   This season he mentioned his family was going to host Mason McCoy; he may have hosted more than one.   It would be interesting to hear his insights on that topic.  

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2 minutes ago, Frobby said:

We have a poster here, Oldorioles, who hosts players at Aberdeen.   This season he mentioned his family was going to host Mason McCoy; he may have hosted more than one.   It would be interesting to hear his insights on that topic.  

It would be interesting to hear a real perspective on this.

I found this quote and wow, only 10% make it (if their data isn't flawed):

Quote

Far less than 10% of minor league players ever get the chance to make it to the major leagues, where the minimum pay is $507,500 for a season and the average pay is $4.4 million.

http://money.cnn.com/2016/07/01/news/companies/minor-league-baseball-pay/index.html

 

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1 hour ago, Redskins Rick said:

It would be interesting to hear a real perspective on this.

I found this quote and wow, only 10% make it (if their data isn't flawed):

 

Whether that “far less than 10%” figure is accurate probably depends on how many international players are included in this, but even so, I doubt it’s accurate.    Each team debuts about 7-8 players in the majors each season.   So, for that to be less than 10%, they’d have to be signing more than 70-80 players a year.    They only sign 30-40 through the draft, so they’d need to be signing at least that same number internationally to reach that figure, and I don’t think teams sign nearly that many each year.

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2 minutes ago, Frobby said:

Whether that “far less than 10%” figure is accurate probably depends on how many international players are included in this, but even so, I doubt it’s accurate.    Each team debuts about 7-8 players in the majors each season.   So, for that to be less than 10%, they’d have to be signing more than 70-80 players a year.    They only sign 30-40 through the draft, so they’d need to be signing at least that same number internationally to reach that figure, and I don’t think teams sign nearly that many each year.

How many walkins, not drafted that they take a peak at in instructional lower single A or even regular A leagues? I suspect this might skew the numbers down.

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On November 21, 2017 at 8:19 AM, Redskins Rick said:

 

I heard it said a couple of times, if you have 10 major league pitching prospects, then you will have 3 major league pitchers.

The chart below is not exactly what you was asking.

But, I found it was interesting:

https://www.blessyouboys.com/2013/3/5/3977782/what-are-the-odds-of-making-it-to-the-major-leagues

Thank you for your diligent research ...I've become enlightened by the process.

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