Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
scOtt

George HW Bush died

Recommended Posts

Despite my political leanings, I have/had a lot of respect for HW. In WWII he was flying a torpedo bomber in the Pacific. Was shot down by the Japanese. Bailed out BEFORE ejector seats. Think about it... struggled to get his canopy opened, climbed out, jumped, missed the tail of the plane... parachuted down. He made it to a deserted island. Hid out for days til a submarine spotted him and got him home.

Later he was the Director of the CIA. It doesn't get much more badass than all that.

RIP

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last President who nobody really despised.    He was a true gentleman but tough when he needed to be.    His prosecution of the Gulf War, both building the international coalition behind it and then executing the military operation, was nothing short of brilliant.   He was a little out of touch with the common man, but overall history will treat him kindly, I think. 

Rest In Peace, Mr. President.  

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DtVjxpgWkAEldPS.jpg

Tom Boswell did a nice article in 1989 reviewing his baseball career and persona at the time.

"He's the real thing -- a legit ballplayer -- although he habitually soft-pedals it. In the first college World Series ever played, in 1947, Bush's Yale team played the illustrious University of California, led by Jackie Jensen, in the national championship game. The next year, Yale reached the national finals again, this time against Southern California. Back in that post-war golden age of baseball talent, no college played a higher level of ball than Yale, which thumped schools like North Carolina and Clemson and, during one 11-game Bush-era winning streak, outscored its foes by 76-20. The Elis coach, Ethan Allen, was a career .300 hitter in the majors. Three of Bush's teammates reached the big leagues and others played in the minors. Yale then was Stanford or Miami now. How good was Bush? Good enough that he never missed a game at first base in three years and, his senior year, was team captain. Good enough that, his last year, he fielded .990 on 190 chances and batted .264 with six doubles, two triples, a home run and a 28 runs produced in 25 games. And, finally, good enough that Yale teammate Dick Tettelbach (Yankees and Senators) has seriously compared him to Keith Hernandez as a defensive first baseman."

"... he still claims to have a "Walter Mitty" joy in throwing out first balls. In fact, it will take more than a faraway coup d'etat to keep him from doing the honors in Baltimore on Monday. He even plans to bring Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak with him.Pitching, and P.R., Tips From Ryan Nolan Ryan, one of Bush's longtime baseball friends, has filled the President's ear with First Ball advice. "Nolan says throw it high because amateurs get out there, no matter how good they are, and throw it into the dirt . . . You get more of an 'ooooh' {from the crowd} if you heave it over the {catcher's} head instead of going with the fast-breaking deuce into the dirt." History notes, and Bush knows, that Ronald Reagan's initial First Ball cleared Rick Dempsey's leap by two feet and was met with majestic "ooooohs." Bush even plots his First Ball strategy for getting to the mound. "I will stride to the mound," he said, "then stop a couple of steps short of the rubber and encourage the catcher ahead of time to {cheat out} in front of the plate."

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, bobmc said:

DtVjxpgWkAEldPS.jpg

Tom Boswell did a nice article in 1989 reviewing his baseball career and persona at the time.

"He's the real thing -- a legit ballplayer -- although he habitually soft-pedals it. In the first college World Series ever played, in 1947, Bush's Yale team played the illustrious University of California, led by Jackie Jensen, in the national championship game. The next year, Yale reached the national finals again, this time against Southern California. Back in that post-war golden age of baseball talent, no college played a higher level of ball than Yale, which thumped schools like North Carolina and Clemson and, during one 11-game Bush-era winning streak, outscored its foes by 76-20. The Elis coach, Ethan Allen, was a career .300 hitter in the majors. Three of Bush's teammates reached the big leagues and others played in the minors. Yale then was Stanford or Miami now. How good was Bush? Good enough that he never missed a game at first base in three years and, his senior year, was team captain. Good enough that, his last year, he fielded .990 on 190 chances and batted .264 with six doubles, two triples, a home run and a 28 runs produced in 25 games. And, finally, good enough that Yale teammate Dick Tettelbach (Yankees and Senators) has seriously compared him to Keith Hernandez as a defensive first baseman."

"... he still claims to have a "Walter Mitty" joy in throwing out first balls. In fact, it will take more than a faraway coup d'etat to keep him from doing the honors in Baltimore on Monday. He even plans to bring Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak with him.Pitching, and P.R., Tips From Ryan Nolan Ryan, one of Bush's longtime baseball friends, has filled the President's ear with First Ball advice. "Nolan says throw it high because amateurs get out there, no matter how good they are, and throw it into the dirt . . . You get more of an 'ooooh' {from the crowd} if you heave it over the {catcher's} head instead of going with the fast-breaking deuce into the dirt." History notes, and Bush knows, that Ronald Reagan's initial First Ball cleared Rick Dempsey's leap by two feet and was met with majestic "ooooohs." Bush even plots his First Ball strategy for getting to the mound. "I will stride to the mound," he said, "then stop a couple of steps short of the rubber and encourage the catcher ahead of time to {cheat out} in front of the plate."

 

Bush batted right and threw left, an extremely rare combination.   Rickey Henderson is the only major leaguer I know offhand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, SteveA said:

Bush batted right and threw left, an extremely rare combination.   Rickey Henderson is the only major leaguer I know offhand.

Boswell mentioned Cleon Jones also as being decent at it but few were - Joey Rickard?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, bobmc said:

Boswell mentioned Cleon Jones also as being decent at it but few were - Joey Rickard?

oh yeah how could I forget Joey!

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Frobby said:

The last President who nobody really despised.    He was a true gentleman but tough when he needed to be.    His prosecution of the Gulf War, both building the international coalition behind it and then executing the military operation, was nothing short of brilliant.   He was a little out of touch with the common man, but overall history will treat him kindly, I think. 

Rest In Peace, Mr. President.  

LOL perhaps but would you consider Tom Boswell a "common man"?

"President Bush’s gift for personal connection, naturalness and self-deprecating warmth was extraordinary, as was wife Barbara’s, as many have noted. I’m certain I was never in his top-million acquaintances, yet during one phone call he said, “Have you and Wendy seen any good movies lately?”

My thought, “Sir, isn’t there something else you should be doing?” Once the Gulf War began, he had a lot to do. And there was no more time for sportswriters.

Many serious people will have memories about this excellent yet somehow still modest man who, at every stage of his life, prepared himself for his nation’s highest office more thoroughly than perhaps any president before or since."

https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/george-hw-bush-had-a-love-of-sports-and-an-affinity-for-at-least-one-sportswriter/2018/12/01/328a2e66-f5b0-11e8-80d0-f7e1948d55f4_story.html?utm_term=.8a46d0486a07

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, SteveA said:

 

Bush batted right and threw left, an extremely rare combination. Rickey Henderson is the only major leaguer I know offhand.

 

 

 

4 hours ago, bobmc said:

 

Boswell mentioned Cleon Jones also as being decent at it, but few were - Joey Rickard?

 

o

 

Jones' reason for his unusual combination of batting right-handed and fielding left-handed is extremely interesting. 

The reason being was that when he was a kid playing wiffle ball with his friends in their neighborhood, the entire right side of the field was deemed to be foul territory because they did not have enough defenders to cover the entire field ........ so even though he was a natural lefty, Jones adapted to the neighborhood rules for their wiffle ball games by batting right-handed, presuming that he would just have hit a ton of foul balls had he batted from his natural left-handed stance.

 

I read about this when I was a teeneager in the early 80's in a book called The Summer Game, by Roger Angell.

 

 

Image result for The Summer Game

 

o

  • Upvote 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, bobmc said:

LOL perhaps but would you consider Tom Boswell a "common man"?

"President Bush’s gift for personal connection, naturalness and self-deprecating warmth was extraordinary, as was wife Barbara’s, as many have noted. I’m certain I was never in his top-million acquaintances, yet during one phone call he said, “Have you and Wendy seen any good movies lately?”

My thought, “Sir, isn’t there something else you should be doing?” Once the Gulf War began, he had a lot to do. And there was no more time for sportswriters.

Many serious people will have memories about this excellent yet somehow still modest man who, at every stage of his life, prepared himself for his nation’s highest office more thoroughly than perhaps any president before or since."

https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/george-hw-bush-had-a-love-of-sports-and-an-affinity-for-at-least-one-sportswriter/2018/12/01/328a2e66-f5b0-11e8-80d0-f7e1948d55f4_story.html?utm_term=.8a46d0486a07

I didn’t mean at all that Bush was a snob.    He famously treated others with respect no matter from what walk of life.   I was mostly thinking of this famous incident from his presidency:  https://www.nytimes.com/1992/02/05/us/bush-encounters-the-supermarket-amazed.html

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look up Jim Vance and George H.W. Bush on YouTube.  The one about the fishing trip on the Potomac.  It's a great clip of the late local news anchor and the President.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a remarkable man for sure.

Wow, to have been married to the same woman for 73 years. What an amazing feat that was, and from the outside looking in, they were a legit couple, and not just two people sharing the same last name and house.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also he did a great job shepherding the world into the post-Soviet era (or at least didn't take any aggressive actions that may have provoked more support for a hard-line anti-reform coup in the Soviet Union).  I think it's very strange how everyone seems to forget what a remarkable event the peaceful dissolution of the Soviet Union was. 

Easily could have resulted in a civil war or hard-line military coup in a country bristling with nuclear weapons and ICBMs.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎12‎/‎1‎/‎2018 at 3:53 PM, SteveA said:

Bush batted right and threw left, an extremely rare combination.   Rickey Henderson is the only major leaguer I know offhand.

Dave McNally

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

Orioles Information


Orioles News and Information

Daily Organizational Boxscores

News

Tony's Takes

Orioles Prospect Information

2018 End of Season Top 30 Prospects List

Prospect Scouting Reports

Statistics

2019 Spring Training Stats

Baseball Savant Stats

Minor League Stats







  • Posts

    • I'd be genuinely thrilled to see Bleier at the ASG
    • You're just cherry picking the stats to prove your point.   
    • They're paying more-or-less Harper money for a player of similar age but who has Harper's one peak year almost every year.  Trout is #1 on the all time bb-ref WAR list through his age.  You can go down 50 or 75 spots below Trout and you have 80% of the players there as clear HOFers.   Trout's peers are Cobb, Mantle, Hornsby, ARod, Foxx, Ott, Griffey Jr, Speaker, Vaughn, Aaron, Frank... If you're not willing to pay going rates for Mike Trout, you would have also been willing to let any of those players walk because they were too risky.   Here's a list of players whose entire careers were worth less than Trout has been so far: Winfield, Ashburn, Billy Williams, Sliding Billy Hamilton, Lou Boudreau, Home Run Baker, Jesse Burkett, Harmon Killebrew, Mike Piazza, Vlad, Yogi, Hank Greenberg, Willie Stargell, Bill Dickey, Joe Medwick, Willie Keeler, George Sisler, Jimmy Collins, Elmer Flick.  There are nine Hall of Famers whose entire careers were worth less than half of Mike Trout's first eight seasons.
    • I love all the information available, especially on prospects. There's a great wealth of knowledge among everyone who contributes, and I appreciate that.
    • I agree with you that Beane and Moneyball was really influential...but it only sorta', kinda' worked.  2002 Stats: Hudson 238 IP ERA+145 Zito 229 IP ERA+ 158 Mulder 207 IP ERA+125 Lidle 192IP ERA+112 Zito and Mulder were first round draft picks. I didn't read the book, but I loved the movie. But I think the truth is that analytics had way, way, way less to do with the success of those teams than the hype would lead some to believe. If so, then the influence of the book on the spread of analytics may be more to do with hype and spin than an actual analysis of the effects of analytics. I find that fun.  It will be interesting to see how analytics are viewed in ten to fifteen years. I think in some cases the "success" of analytics on team wins could be luck much like how some scouts back in the day made a name for themselves by signing a player that turned out to be a great player. A big part of that is getting lucky with injuries, etc. I wonder if the same thing might be happening with some of the models that supposedly said pick player A over player B in a draft, etc. Only time will tell and maybe not even then (pretty soon everybody will be doing pretty much the same thing with analytics and there may be no relative advantages as it becomes part of the status quo).   
    • At least. The NFL cap is also complicated in that signing bonuses are prorated for each year of the contract (e.g. $20M bonus on a 4 year contract counts for $5M each year) and those prorated things come due right away when a player is traded or cut. So for example Joe Flacco was traded and the Ravens aren't paying him anything this year but he still counts $16M against the Ravens' cap this year. But also they just signed Earl Thomas, he'll get a $20M signing bonus and a $2M salary this year but he only counts $7M against the cap. Maybe it all sort of evens out but who knows.
    • No one cares.  Except us.  And we're not surprised.
  • Popular Contributors

  • Popular Now

×
×
  • Create New...