Jump to content
mcloy

Who is next?

Recommended Posts

Cashner traded yesterday afternoon to Boston for prospects. A little over 2 weeks left until the deadline. Who is next to go if anyone? I don't see Bundy having much value return or fit for contenders right now, and I think O's hang on to Trey. IMO the logical choice is Givens. Obviously there is no rush to trade him, but the reliever market always picks up closer to the deadline. I know his ERA is a little bloated this year, but he's shown he can be a multi-inning option at some points with strong K numbers. What is an appropriate return for Givens?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, mdbdotcom said:

A couple of low level prospects.

Unfortunately outside of MAYBE Mancini this is all anyone will get us back. The only way I see us landing a top prospect is if there’s one Elias and get don’t value in the system that some other team does and they packaged him in with a player on the MLB roster. But that’s wishful thinking. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Bmorebirds24 said:

Unfortunately outside of MAYBE Mancini this is all anyone will get us back. The only way I see us landing a top prospect is if there’s one Elias and get don’t value in the system that some other team does and they packaged him in with a player on the MLB roster. But that’s wishful thinking. 

Givens can bring back something.  Teams always need bullpen help and he striking out 12.8/9.  He's only making 2.15M and he's got two more years of team control.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Moose Milligan said:

All I want back is 17 year old DSL prospects. 

You guys are gonna rue the day that Elias traded Cashner for two 17 year old DSL prospects because I'm just going to say thats all I want back in every make believe trade thread for the next year.  

And I don't just want ANY 17 year old DSL prospects, I want ones with no video and no pictures and only murky scouting reports to further annoy everyone here.  I don't even want 17 year old DSL prospects that have been ranked on a 20-80 scale, I want as little information about these guys as possible.  Even what they signed for is maybe a little too much information but I don't see how that's avoidable.  

You could go next level and scour names from the rosters of the DSL teams.  For instance someone mentions the Cardinals for Mancini, Bam, Engels Martinez and Yordy Richard. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Can_of_corn said:

You could go next level and scour names from the rosters of the DSL teams.  For instance someone mentions the Cardinals for Mancini, Bam, Engels Martinez and Yordy Richard. 

Done.  I want all those guys.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd bet on givens as next to go too. He's got control through 2022 and has solid strike out numbers. Keep an eye on the yankees who might lose chapman to FA.

I have a hunch Mancini goes because it would be selling high which is smart but not for the return some people expect

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd say either Givens or Villar is next. Mancini is ice cold and Bundy is hurt so I think they'll both be here after the deadline.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bmorebirds24 said:

Unfortunately outside of MAYBE Mancini this is all anyone will get us back. The only way I see us landing a top prospect is if there’s one Elias and get don’t value in the system that some other team does and they packaged him in with a player on the MLB roster. But that’s wishful thinking. 

Mancini isn’t bringing back anything.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Cashner brought back X, can Givens be expected To bring back the same or more? He’s younger, cheaper, possibly better, and he would fill arguably a more important role.

 On the other hand, he’s been pretty mediocre this season… 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Givens is next.  Low level prospects in A ball or lower.  Elias already showed his preference for high/risk high reward.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


Orioles Information


Orioles News and Information

Daily Organizational Boxscores

News

Tony's Takes

Orioles Roster Resource

Orioles Prospect Information

2018 End of Season Top 30 Prospects List

Prospect Scouting Reports

Statistics

2019 Orioles Stats

2019 Orioles Minor League Stats

Baseball Savant Stats







  • Posts

    • I'm multitasking.
    • I'm here too, logged in as DJ Stewart's number one fan on the board. I like the guys who don't look like athletes.
    • Here's bad news: I'm watching. 
    • Looks like it's just me and you here, @eddie83
    • So I had a grand theory all ready to explain modern baseball, based on the impact of the information revolution on defense.  According to the theory, better data has allowed teams to better measure individual defense and the contribution of defense to run prevention, which has led to increased emphasis on defensive ability in personnel decisions.  Better data has also led to shifts and other improvements in defensive positioning.  All of these factors have led in theory to improved defensive efficiency--an increase in the percentage of balls in play that are converted into outs.  In turn, this has led to a change in optimal offensive strategies.  If it's harder to get hits on balls in play, then it is less likely that you will be able to score runs by stringing a bunch of singles together, or by using small ball tactics like base stealing, the hit and run and the sacrifice.  Teams thus optimally put more emphasis on power in personnel decisions, because a home run is the one way to score runs that can't be stopped by good defense. Great theory, huh?  Then I looked at the data.  Here are the numbers for aggregate defensive efficiency for MLB since 2001: 2001:  0.691     2002:  0.695   2003:  0.694   2004:  0.691   2005:  0.693   2006:  0.687   2007:  0.686   2008:  0.689 2009:  0.690   2010:  0.691   2011:  0.694    2012:  0.691   2013:  0.692   2014:  0.690    2015:  0.689    2016: 0.688 2017:  0.688    2018:  0.691 So twenty years into the defensive revolution, we have...the same defensive efficiency that we had in 2001.  Teams on the whole are doing no better today at converting balls in play into outs than they were in 2001, despite all of the shifts and all of the zone ratings and other defensive measures that are now available.   So much for my theory.  Some earlier posts suggest another theory--improved pitch design and velocity have made it harder to hit for contact, which increases strikeouts and reduces batting average.  In turn this leads to a greater emphasis on power at the expense of contact, increasing home runs, further increasing strikeouts and further reducing batting average.  That theory may be correct, but it's less obvious to me that the correct strategic response to improved pitch design and velocity is to sacrifice contact for power. It could go the other way--in response to better pitching, it is even more important to hit for contact, to put the ball in play, to sustain an offense.  It would take a model simulation to determine whether the optimal response to power pitching is to emphasize power hitting.   Or it could just be a juiced ball!  
    • Two out walk no damage. I say Orioles win 8-2 tonight.  
    • Holy hell Soler is having himself a season.
  • Popular Contributors

×
×
  • Create New...