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Dr Dave

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About Dr Dave

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  • Birthday 9/19/1958

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    Anne Arundel County, MD

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  1. Here's an interesting variation on that ... Suppose it is a N.L. game - said pitcher comes in and retires the last batter. The pitcher happens to be the leadoff hitter in the next inning. Even though he only faced one batter, would you want to legislate away his manager's option to pinch-hit for him? I would think that once the side has been retired, that should complete the pitcher's obligation for batters faced.
  2. Yes, I know this was actually in late 2018 after the season, but I think it deserves a mention - The Victor Victor Mesa saga. (Edited to correct typo)
  3. It's theoretically possible. Imagine a year when an entire division is equally bad. They play approximately 0.500 against each other, but all of them get beat up by the rest of the league (and interleague play too). Such a division would have everybody under 0.500 - but somebody would still be the division winner. To the best of my knowledge it has never happened (at least in baseball), although there may have been a close call or two. Paradoxically, I would assume the only way to get into the playoffs while under 0.500 is to win a division - I can't see a wild card team ever being un
  4. Not the longest. After joining the Yankees and moving to the outfield, Babe Ruth went from 1921 (second year with NY) when he pitched two games, to 1930 when he started a game (and got a complete game win!). He would again start a single game in 1933, also a CG win. So the Babe had around 9 years, give or take a few months, between pitching. Although it wouldn't surprise me if a career minor leaguer may have done that at both ends of his career. Interesting trivia question. EDIT: Just found out the correct answer is Paul Schreiber, who went 22 years between ML pitching a
  5. Well, the optimist will say "The Orioles are in First Place!" The pessimist will say "The Orioles are in Last Place." The realist will say "Small sample size!" I may normally be a realist, but today I will be the optimist. I will enjoy this while I can Now, if they can win the next game and actually be over .500 - even for just a fleeting moment - hey, I can dream, can't I?
  6. I may be wrong on this - if so, please correct me - but once AJ became a free agent, doesn't the "5 year" part of the 10/5 no-trade protection reset back to zero if he were to come back, and he would no longer have the automatic no-trade protection? Like the others, my heart would love to have AJ back - but my head knows that the team needs to be looking at OFs of the future, not OFs of the past.
  7. Was fiddling around with some numbers and noticed that with 60 games left this year (barring rainouts), there's a chance that Buck's W/L record with the team will drop below 0.500. The Orioles would need to go at least 26-34 (a 0.433 clip) to avoid this. Doesn't seem terribly likely. Kind of a shame since Buck's arrival brought the Orioles prosperity that hadn't been seen in quite a few years, as well as a multi-year period where they won more games than any other team.
  8. Yes! Felix got pied in his cycle game (August 14 2009), although it took two attempts. I was at that game and witnessed it live.
  9. Is it still allowed to add incentive clauses to player contracts, such as a bonus for reaching 30 HR, or 40 HR? If so, would it work to not pick up Reynolds' option but tell him we'd love to have you, and then offer to extend him 1-2 years, say at $6M, but with incentives where he could get to $11M if he has the season we hope he can have (say .250, 40 HR).
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