Jump to content
Ooooooohhhh!!!!

Astronomy, Cosmology, and Telescopes

Recommended Posts

Thanks that helped I might go more with a computerized one so I can sound smart and start knowing in advance what I am seeing. Maybe something like this http://www.telescope.com/Telescopes/GoTo-Computerized-Telescopes/Orion-StarBlast-6i-IntelliScope-Reflector-Telescope/pc/-1/c/1/sc/15/p/102026.uts

This is just my opinion (I know many others share the same opinion), but I feel it's better to spend your money on a better telescope than on a computer. The computer can certainly be useful for finding tricky objects like faint galaxies and nebulas. At the same time a better scope will let you see more objects and give you better views of the easier to spot objects. I also think part of the fun of using the telescope is finding objects that are relatively harder to spot.

I got this package of books with my scope and they are very helpful. I'm always using Discover the Stars. I'd also recommend getting a moon filter right away. The moon is obviously easy to find and you can get some incredible views. It's a little too bright to look at without a filter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a good article from the Orion website for picking a telescope.

Like choosing neighborhoods, automobiles, or spouses, buying a first telescope is a highly subjective undertaking. There?s no "best" telescope for everyone. The one that?s right for you will depend on your lifestyle and your astronomy goals. Spending a little time analyzing your motivations will help you make an intelligent choice. Let?s look at the different types of telescopes, and in so doing, some of the considerations that might influence your buying decision.

Power is Not the Important Thing

The first point to emphasize is that magnifying power is NOT the most important consideration when choosing a telescope. Not even close. It is the telescope?s light-gathering capability, or aperture, that determines how much you will be able to see. Overblown claims of 450x or 575x power (or more!) in ads for inexpensive telescopes are pure baloney, and a sure sign of inferior quality. The brightest, sharpest images are obtained at much lower powers, on the order of 25x to 50x.

Refractors

A small, quality achromatic refractor of 60mm to 80mm aperture makes a fine starter scope for observing the Moon and major planets. They?re inexpensive ($100 to $350), portable, and maintenance-free ? all desirable factors if you?re just "testing the waters" of the hobby. Their small apertures aren?t well suited for faint deep-sky objects, though. If nebulas and galaxies are your main interest, a Newtonian reflector or Schmidt-Cassegrain is the way to go. Moving up to a 90mm or 100mm refractor will snare more objects and provide better performance, for a higher price. Renowned for crisp, sharp images, refractors are the priciest per inch of aperture of all telescope types.

A refractor is the scope of choice if you will be doing most of your stargazing from city or suburbs, where the night skies are moderately light-polluted. Here, more aperture doesn?t gain you much, since viewing is restricted mostly to the Moon and planets. In fact, a big scope would only amplify the skyglow, yielding poor washed out images.

Reflectors

Newtonian reflectors are great all-around scopes, offering generous apertures at affordable prices. They excel for both planetary and deep-sky viewing. Of course, the larger the aperture, the more you?ll see. Smaller, 3" and 4.5" equatorially mounted Newtonians will provide a nice "survey" of celestial luminaries, and they?re plenty portable. Six-inch and 8" Newts have enough aperture to deliver captivating images of fainter fare-clusters, galaxies, and nebulas-especially in a reasonably dark sky. The tradeoff is their bulk and weight ? something you should definitely take into account before you buy. But a 6" Newtonian on a Dobsonian mount is easily manageable by one person, and makes a wonderful beginner scope. Dobsonian-mounted reflectors have lower price tags than their equatorial counterparts, starting in the mid-$300s for a 6" Dob.

Schmidt-Cassegrains

If portability is important to you, you might want to consider a "catadioptric" scope such as a Schmidt-Cassegrain or Maksutov-Cassegrain. They pack a hefty aperture into a very compact tube. An 8" Schmidt-Cassegrain provides excellent views of the Moon, planets, and deep-sky objects, and is well suited for astrophotography. But an SC is a considerable investment for a beginner ? over $1000 for the most basic 8" models (and hundreds more to outfit it for astrophotography). Although compact, an 8" SC is actually quite a lot of scope to manage when you include the beefy tripod and mount. So beware!

Telescope Mounts

A quick word about mounts. Telescopes come on three basic mount types: altazimuth, Dobsonian, or equatorial. The altazimuth is the simplest and is recommended for casual stargazing and terrestrial observing. The Dobsonian mount is a boxy altaz-type mount designed for easy maneuvering of large Newtonian tubes of 6" aperture or greater. Equatorial mounts are a bit more complicated (and more expensive) than altazimuth mounts, but allow the user to follow the motion of celestial objects with a single manual hand control, or even automatically with a motor drive ? a great convenience.

The Bottom Line

OK, now that you?ve gotten the crash course on telescopes, here?s some parting advice for aspiring astronomers:

Get as much aperture as you can reasonably handle, but not more.

Big aperture is desirable, sure, but you don?t want to end up with a scope that is too big or complicated to conveniently set up, haul around-and use! Also, avoid those gee-whiz, techno-toy scopes with the hefty price tags that are showing up in the big chain stores. For a first telescope, we recommend a basic refractor of 90mm aperture or smaller, or a Newtonian reflector of 6" aperture or less, unless you?re really committed. After you?ve learned the basics of observing and developed an appreciation for the hobby, then you can move up to a bigger, fancier scope.

Just send us an email at sales@telescope.com, contact us via live chat, or give us a call Toll-Free at 800-676-1343 and we?ll help you find the right telescope!

Edited by Ooooooohhhh!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally got out and put my new moon filter to use. Unbelievable. Looking at the line where the shadow meets the sunlight was amazing. With my high powered eyepieces I could see so much detail. I left like I was looking at a ball that was sitting in my hand. I can't wait to get my dad out so we can use his camera to take pictures. I'll be sure to post them on here.

Edited by Ooooooohhhh!!!!
Typo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I finally got out and put my new moon filter to use. Unbelievable. Looking at the line where the shadow meets the line was amazing. With my high powered eyepieces I could see so much detail. I left like I was looking at a ball that was sitting in my hand. I can't wait to get my dad out so we can use his camera to take pictures. I'll be sure to post them on here.

Sounds great! Would love to see pics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just because I realized I had better video already saved...

<embed width="600" height="361" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowFullscreen="true" allowNetworking="all" wmode="transparent" src="http://static.photobucket.com/player.swf" flashvars="file=http://vidmg.photobucket.com/albums/v340%2Fif6was9/BillNyeIntro.mp4">

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I found this on weather.com. A recent and occurring near Earth asteroid PHOTOGRAPHED!

http://www.weather.com/video/close-call-asteroid-photographed-33256

Warning, videoS just keep on loading after that one.

That's awesome. Take a good look, that could be similar to the eventual Earth killer.

Greg Pappas posted this on Facebook: Five Planets Found

Because stars are so bright it's basically impossible to see a planet orbiting another star with our current technology. Scientists have to infer the existence of planets based on the motion of the star. When stars have an orbit it shows the effects of gravity on them by another large body. It's incredible that scientists can detect five planets orbiting a star and know their masses. Not only that, but they know that one lies in the habitable zone. The more we learn about other solar systems as well as our own solar system the more I am convinced that there is life throughout the universe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They now can also detect planets by the the slight difference in the light from the star when the planet passes in front. Planet hunting is probably the most exciting thing in science today IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
They now can also detect planets by the the slight difference in the light from the star when the planet passes in front. Planet hunting is probably the most exciting thing in science today IMO.

I forgot they were doing that now. Thanks for pointing that out.

We're going to have a fly-by in two weeks. This is pretty scary to be honest. An asteroid this size would level a city and it'll be inside the geosynchronous orbit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wanted to post this this morning but didn't have time. Glad it's still up. New Habitable Zone definition.

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/50628915/ns/technology_and_science-space/#.UQn62PLfkfU

I never realized that the Earth was so close to the inner edge of the habitable zone. Pretty neat stuff there.

It brings up an interesting point. While there are stars that are magnitudes large than our sun, our sun is in fact larger than most of the stars we see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I never realized that the Earth was so close to the inner edge of the habitable zone. Pretty neat stuff there.

It brings up an interesting point. While there are stars that are magnitudes large than our sun, our sun is in fact larger than most of the stars we see.

It was this new and improved definition that pushed the Earth to the leading (hotter) edge. Fascinating stuff! It also redefines what exoplanets our astronomers will look at.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/7vXDLEGkL9M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

And now for something completely different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


Orioles Information


Orioles News and Information

Daily Organizational Boxscores

News

Tony's Takes

Orioles Roster Resource

Orioles Prospect Information

2018 End of Season Top 30 Prospects List

Prospect Scouting Reports

Statistics

2019 Orioles Stats

2019 Orioles Minor League Stats

Baseball Savant Stats







×
×
  • Create New...