Jump to content
OriolesManiac88

Chris Davis tested positive for amphetamines. (25 Game Ban)

Why did he do it?  

48 members have voted

  1. 1. Why did he do it?

    • ADHD
      14
    • Performance
      34


Recommended Posts

Davis had been telling team mates that the "ball began to look like a blur" and that the adderall was most definitely to combat ADD/ADHD.

I believe him, although I'm not pleased with the system for penalizing the player and the team AND we don't know what steps a player can take to appeal an MLB ruling on what you can be allowed to take on a case by case basis. That is just odd.

Does anyone know when the test he failed was administered? Is this the type of thing that is immediate or would it take a few weeks between the failed test and the ruling?

The sensible thing to do is get the prescription in case you need it, then don't use it unless it necessary.

Not getting a waiver for something that might be needful isn't very smart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be impossible to vote on this poll. Not a single person here has any knowledge of Davis' medical history so any voting would be based purely on speculation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heyman article from late last night

http://www.cbssports.com/mlb/writer/jon-heyman/24707193/why-did-davis-do-it-thanks-to-condition-ball-began-to-look-like-a-blur

This thing clarified a few facts for me if we are to trust Heyman:

Davis may have felt desperate. Davis told friends it got to the point that he “couldn't see the baseball,” that it was “a blur” and that he was starting to feel “naked” at the plate as the pressure mounted in a year with a lot going on.
Davis in fact lost the TUE sometimes before 2013 according to people familiar with the situation. While Davis had the TUE as a Ranger, as was originally prescribed by his hometown doctor, MLB's JDA panel ruled after interviewing him sometime prior to the '13 that he would no longer have baseball's approval for the drug he'd long taken.

It's interesting that he presumably didn't have it for all of 2013, but started to experience "setbacks" in 2014. The big question is did the pressure of the homers bring on the "blurred vision" or did it happen naturally?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Heyman article from late last night

http://www.cbssports.com/mlb/writer/jon-heyman/24707193/why-did-davis-do-it-thanks-to-condition-ball-began-to-look-like-a-blur

This thing clarified a few facts for me if we are to trust Heyman:

It's interesting that he presumably didn't have it for all of 2013, but started to experience "setbacks" in 2014. The big question is did the pressure of the homers bring on the "blurred vision" or did it happen naturally?

Sounds like the description Josh Hamilton gave when he tried quitting tobacco.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The sensible thing to do is get the prescription in case you need it, then don't use it unless it necessary.

Not getting a waiver for something that might be needful isn't very smart.

I don't disagree. The onus is on him (his personal team) to do that. NOT getting that done sort of indicates that agents don't think suspensions negatively impact their bottom line, and maybe they don't. I find it hard to believe that Davis' representation would allow for an oversight like this unless they feel they can't change the rule, and they don't have THAT much to gain by fighting hard to change it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It would be impossible to vote on this poll. Not a single person here has any knowledge of Davis' medical history so any voting would be based purely on speculation.

Speculate? On a sports themed internet forum?!

Well, I'll be!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Speculate? On a sports themed internet forum?!

Well, I'll be!

Its difficult to speculate about a possible medical condition when we have no information whatsoever. Anyone who votes is voting without any certainty that their position is right or wrong. Normally, when we're discussing things here, and have polls there is some data at least to back up people's positions on why they voted the way they did. There is absolutely no data that anyone can show here, because not a single one of us knows Davis' medical history.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The sensible thing to do is get the prescription in case you need it, then don't use it unless it necessary.

Not getting a waiver for something that might be needful isn't very smart.

I don't know if you saw this article but it sheds some light on how the TUE works.

http://www.dailynews.com/sports/20140912/dodgers-jp-howell-is-familiar-with-baseballs-rules-for-prescription-drug-use

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As to MLB, it's pretty obvious that players are getting their doctors to over prescribe Adderall. Use of the drug among major league players is four or five times greater than in the general population. So while it's nice to say that medical decisions should be between a person and his doctor, something is clearly going on there, and if MLB has decided to be more stringent in granting Therapeutic Use Exemptions, I support that decision.

I have a problem with this and people constantly bringing it up. My problem is why does everyone think the "general population" is afforded all the same medical and pharmaceutical remedies of a Major League baseball player? I mean really? I have 2 sons on Ritalin, pay over $1000 on monthly health insurance premiums for a family of 5 and still have to fork out $200 a month in copays for the scripts. Do the math and let me know if the entire "general population", who have ADD, can manage to get the script.

Edited by RichmondVA Orio

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jayson Stark's take - he makes some good points, speculative of course, but hints at athlete's becoming "addicted" (for lack of a better term) to using Adderall.

"You should recognize that Adderall is a powerful, physically and psychologically addictive stimulant. I've spoken to athletes who have taken it. I've spoken to their representatives. I've spoken to people in the sports world who have dealt with athletes and their Adderall issues firsthand.

It's easy for all of us to say that guys like Davis should just stop taking it if they know they don't have a league-approved, therapeutic use exemption. Obviously, that's what they should do.

But Davis' suspension Friday was just one more reminder that it's something many of them can't do."

http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/11513292/chris-davis-problem-baltimore-orioles-problem

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Heyman article from late last night

http://www.cbssports.com/mlb/writer/jon-heyman/24707193/why-did-davis-do-it-thanks-to-condition-ball-began-to-look-like-a-blur

This thing clarified a few facts for me if we are to trust Heyman:

It's interesting that he presumably didn't have it for all of 2013, but started to experience "setbacks" in 2014. The big question is did the pressure of the homers bring on the "blurred vision" or did it happen naturally?

Funny how this all comes from Heyman when it's a Boras client.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a problem with this and people constantly bringing it up. My problem is why does everyone think the "general population" is afforded all the same medical and pharmaceutical remedies of a Major League baseball player? I mean really? I have 2 sons on Ritalin, pay over $1000 on monthly health insurance premiums for a family of 5 and still have to fork out $200 a month in copays for the scripts. Do the math and let me know if the entire "general population", who have ADD, can manage to get the script.

And another thing, where are people getting 4 to 5 times higher than the "general population"???

According to a joint release by MLB and the Players Association in November, a record total of 122 therapeutic exemptions were granted last season, including 119 for ADHD. That number is a controversial one because it means that roughly 10 percent of major-league players have a diagnosis of ADHD, much higher than the 4.4 percent reported among the United States' general population.

http://articles.philly.com/2014-02-20/sports/47493557_1_25-game-suspension-carlos-ruiz-neither-ruiz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And another thing, where are people getting 4 to 5 times higher than the "general population"???

According to a joint release by MLB and the Players Association in November, a record total of 122 therapeutic exemptions were granted last season, including 119 for ADHD. That number is a controversial one because it means that roughly 10 percent of major-league players have a diagnosis of ADHD, much higher than the 4.4 percent reported among the United States' general population.

http://articles.philly.com/2014-02-20/sports/47493557_1_25-game-suspension-carlos-ruiz-neither-ruiz

But ADD/ADHD didn't even exist as a diagnosis when most American adults were children. Look at these numbers for children from the Centers for Disease Control.

Number of children 3-17 years of age ever diagnosed with ADHD: 5.9 million

Percent of children 3-17 years of age ever diagnosed with ADHD: 9.5%

Percent of boys 3-17 years of age ever diagnosed with ADHD: 13.5%

Compared with the general population of kids, MLB players have a less than average % of diagnosis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But ADD/ADHD didn't even exist as a diagnosis when most American adults were children. Look at these numbers for children from the Centers for Disease Control.

Compared with the general population of kids, MLB players have a less than average % of diagnosis.

Here's a link.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If accurate, Chris describing visual processing difficulties makes this a whole different situation than other types of ADHD presentations. Visual motor processing difficulties is a subtype that involves no problems with the eyes themselves, but problems in processing the visual input and translating that in the brain to different actions. Much more complicated and unusual situation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


Orioles Information


Orioles News and Information

Daily Organizational Boxscores
News

Tony's Takes

Orioles Roster Resource

Orioles Prospect Information

2020 Top 30 Prospects List

Prospect Scouting Reports

Statistics

2020 Orioles Stats

2019 Orioles Minor League Stats

Baseball Savant Stats






×
×
  • Create New...