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Todd-O

Will the fans show?

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The Orioles had 8 select games in 2015. They had 23 this year. Should have kept some of those games as classic games.Tried to make more money on each ticket but it might have backfired.That is on top of a 20% increase in tickets for 2016.

There is a tension between maximizing revenue and maximizing attendance. Perhaps the team can make more money by having tiered pricing and overall price hikes than it can make by having uniform pricing at cheaper prices. But if you do too much of the short-term profit maximization thing, you (1) don't build fan loyalty that keeps people coming year in and year out, and (2) you create the half-empty stadium environment that isn't as fun for the fans and (IMO) actually has a negative impact on home-field advantage. I certainly prefer to be at a game with 30,000 screaming fans, compared to a game with 15,000 fans. The atmosphere is just better, even if the lines at concession stands are a bit longer.

So, maybe the O's management cares more right now about revenue than it does about overall attendance, but I do not like it and I think it will come back to bite them if they overdo it.

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There is a tension between maximizing revenue and maximizing attendance. Perhaps the team can make more money by having tiered pricing and overall price hikes than it can make by having uniform pricing at cheaper prices. But if you do too much of the short-term profit maximization thing, you (1) don't build fan loyalty that keeps people coming year in and year out, and (2) you create the half-empty stadium environment that isn't as fun for the fans and (IMO) actually has a negative impact on home-field advantage. I certainly prefer to be at a game with 30,000 screaming fans, compared to a game with 15,000 fans. The atmosphere is just better, even if the lines at concession stands are a bit longer.

So, maybe the O's management cares more right now about revenue than it does about overall attendance, but I do not like it and I think it will come back to bite them if they overdo it.

I prefer 15000 fans to 30000 fans. Easier to park and get out of parking no one crowding me in my seat. I can get cheaper seats and move up. 10,000 would be even better.

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There is a tension between maximizing revenue and maximizing attendance. Perhaps the team can make more money by having tiered pricing and overall price hikes than it can make by having uniform pricing at cheaper prices. But if you do too much of the short-term profit maximization thing, you (1) don't build fan loyalty that keeps people coming year in and year out, and (2) you create the half-empty stadium environment that isn't as fun for the fans and (IMO) actually has a negative impact on home-field advantage. I certainly prefer to be at a game with 30,000 screaming fans, compared to a game with 15,000 fans. The atmosphere is just better, even if the lines at concession stands are a bit longer.

So, maybe the O's management cares more right now about revenue than it does about overall attendance, but I do not like it and I think it will come back to bite them if they overdo it.

Yeah. I'd say so too. Except that the prices are still way cheap. For decent seats. Not great ones. Like yours.

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Problem is people who are too cheap to pay for a ticket aren't going to pay for concessions.

If the tickets are cheaper, I think you can reverse some of that thinking.

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There is a tension between maximizing revenue and maximizing attendance. Perhaps the team can make more money by having tiered pricing and overall price hikes than it can make by having uniform pricing at cheaper prices. But if you do too much of the short-term profit maximization thing, you (1) don't build fan loyalty that keeps people coming year in and year out, and (2) you create the half-empty stadium environment that isn't as fun for the fans and (IMO) actually has a negative impact on home-field advantage. I certainly prefer to be at a game with 30,000 screaming fans, compared to a game with 15,000 fans. The atmosphere is just better, even if the lines at concession stands are a bit longer.

So, maybe the O's management cares more right now about revenue than it does about overall attendance, but I do not like it and I think it will come back to bite them if they overdo it.

Next year should be interesting. Are they going to make all the Cubs and Cardinals games elite? They play the Red Sox and Yankees on the weekends in April. Maybe make them only classic games.

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Next year should be interesting. Are they going to make all the Cubs and cardinals games elite? They play the Red Sox and Yankees on the weekends in April. Maybe make them only classic games.

Yankees are fourth place. They should be classic.

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Yankees are fourth place. They should be classic.

The Yankees were 3rd last year right? Why were they the most expensive tickets on the schedule this year?

Edit: I was wrong, forgot they made playoffs last year.

Edited by Es4M11

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If the tickets are cheaper, I think you can reverse some of that thinking.

Tickets are cheap enough. You could buy 15 dollars tickets and then move down to section 12 tonight. Great section and it will be practically empty. If you can't afford 15 dollar tickets how can you afford a 9 dollar beer and 15 bucks to park.

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Yeah. I'd say so too. Except that the prices are still way cheap. For decent seats. Not great ones. Like yours.

My seats are pretty reasonable compared to what similar seats cost in other stadiums. The same seats I have at OPACY for $60 (up from $48 last year) would cost $90 apiece at Nats Park. But I think it's really important to have a fair number of tickets for $20 or less.

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Tickets are cheap enough. You could buy 15 dollars tickets and then move down to section 12 tonight. Great section and it will be practically empty. If you can't afford 15 dollar tickets how can you afford a 9 dollar beer and 15 bucks to park.

On Sunday or other days but on Sunday you can park near Penn Station for free and take the Circulator bus for free. Bring food in. Soda. If i were a rich man. dadaa.

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Tickets are cheap enough. You could buy 15 dollars tickets and then move down to section 12 tonight. Great section and it will be practically empty. If you can't afford 15 dollar tickets how can you afford a 9 dollar beer and 15 bucks to park.

I don't think it's as simple as pointing to the cheapest ticket in the house and saying just move down to a better section.

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On Sunday or other days but on Sunday you can park near Penn Station for free and take the Circulator bus for free. Bring food in. Soda. If i were a rich man. dadaa.

It's a great deal if you take advantage of the perks. Plus Dugout Club Families with kids get a steal of a deal and they get to run the bases. I never did when I was a kid. Of course Brooks would come talk to you anyway.

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I don't think it's as simple as pointing to the cheapest ticket in the house and saying just move down to a better section.

15 bucks gets you a very enjoyable seat without moving. You just don't get to act like a baller. Shot caller.

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I have mostly become a weekend warrior unless its a game I really want to go to. I guess I am part of the problem with attendance.

I will say this though. It was sad that at 7:40pm on Saturday I saw they were still giving out bobble heads! I have been to games in the past that they had 25,000 of the give away and if you were not there within the first hour of the gates opening you did not get one! It's sad when the bobble head give away on a Saturday can not pack the yard!

I think the Orioles are going to battle that ticket pricing thing for a long time. Is it worth having less fans paying a much higher rate or should you charge less and hope those extra fans make up for it in concession sales?

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15 bucks gets you a very enjoyable seat without moving.

When the stadium is full, I agree. But those sections are always empty and it's no fun sitting up there. Honestly, the Orioles should sell those tickets for $5 until they are selling out the upper deck. Can't hurt, they are barely at 25% capacity most nights

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