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wildcard

BR: O's farm system 18th; list of 10 prospects

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Just now, wildcard said:

Its about time to put the small sample size away.  He has made 9 starts for them.  He is average 6 innings a start and has a 2.80 ERA.  

Gausman has been better than Hamels and Archer — Glasnow has been much better in the AL and so has Cole. Pittsburgh is the one team that is nearly as incompetent as us, the Cole and Archer trades are about as bad as non-Orioles trades get. Glasnow and Cole would be as good a 1-2 as any heading into 2019 — add Taillon and you have, indisputably, the best 1-3 in baseball. They are managed with levels of ineptitude few dare dream of outside of Washington DC. 

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34 minutes ago, wildcard said:

Its about time to put the small sample size away.  He has made 9 starts for them.  He is average 6 innings a start and has a 2.80 ERA.  

3.87 FIP.

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2 hours ago, wildcard said:

Its about time to put the small sample size away.  He has made 9 starts for them.  He is average 6 innings a start and has a 2.80 ERA.  

I’m hugely annoyed at the hijacking of this thread.   

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2 hours ago, Cy Bundy said:

Gausman has been better than Hamels and Archer — Glasnow has been much better in the AL and so has Cole. Pittsburgh is the one team that is nearly as incompetent as us, the Cole and Archer trades are about as bad as non-Orioles trades get. Glasnow and Cole would be as good a 1-2 as any heading into 2019 — add Taillon and you have, indisputably, the best 1-3 in baseball. They are managed with levels of ineptitude few dare dream of outside of Washington DC. 

Just chiming in here. He certainly hasn't been "better than" Hamels.

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3 hours ago, Cy Bundy said:

Gausman has been better than Hamels and Archer — Glasnow has been much better in the AL and so has Cole. Pittsburgh is the one team that is nearly as incompetent as us, the Cole and Archer trades are about as bad as non-Orioles trades get. Glasnow and Cole would be as good a 1-2 as any heading into 2019 — add Taillon and you have, indisputably, the best 1-3 in baseball. They are managed with levels of ineptitude few dare dream of outside of Washington DC. 

😭How is that 1-3 "indisputably" the best in baseball? A guy who has thrown 44 innings at an era above 4 and has a career era of 5.38... a guy who has had a phenomenal year with Houston but has finished in the top 5 cy young exactly once in his 6 year career... a guy who has talent but also had a 4.44 era just last year. I just dont see it. Its without question not better than the Indians, Astros, Dodgers or Cubs. And I'd love to hear how its "indisputably" better than any of these teams:

Indians, Astros, Dodgers, Cubs,  Nationals, Braves, Red Sox, Yankees, Diamondbacks, Cardinals

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2 hours ago, Frobby said:

I’m hugely annoyed at the hijacking of this thread.   

Maybe you could post something that gets the thread back on point and that posters can respond to.

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I like the depth the Orioles have added and I do think the overall situation has improved a great deal with the trades this year.  There is no question that what is lacking are top prospects.  No doubt the Orioles have the chance to impact that over the next 18 months or so, both in the draft, international signings and of course additional trades.

Quantity has been great and needed in spite of it being somewhat underrated here at times (by some).  Quality must be obtained however before we see the sun rise again.


 

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1 hour ago, wildcard said:

Maybe you could post something that get the thread back on point and that posters can respond to.

OK.    So the operative question is who in our system has the potential to become, not just an everyday player, but a star.   I’ll start with the point that nobody knows for sure.    People who are projected as possible stars sometimes don’t realize that potential, and sometimes guys who didn’t seem to have great potential do become stars.   With that, here’s who I’d put on my list of potential stars:

- Hays

- Hall

- Diaz

- Mountcastle

- Rodriguez

In each case, I’d put the odds of the player becoming a star at 25% or less.    If we get 1-2 stars from that group, we will have done well.

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1 hour ago, Frobby said:

OK.    So the operative question is who in our system has the potential to become, not just an everyday player, but a star.   I’ll start with the point that nobody knows for sure.    People who are projected as possible stars sometimes don’t realize that potential, and sometimes guys who didn’t seem to have great potential do become stars.   With that, here’s who I’d put on my list of potential stars:

- Hays

- Hall

- Diaz

- Mountcastle

- Rodriguez

In each case, I’d put the odds of the player becoming a star at 25% or less.    If we get 1-2 stars from that group, we will have done well.

Guys who also have an impact ceiling IMO, although they are longer shots.

Brenan Hanifee - Never underestimate what plus command and solid stuff can do, those types of prospects are continuously underrated. Hanifee looks like he could be a future plus command guy, the strikeouts aren't there yet because he throws a sinker (which actually misses a lot of bats for a sinker) and his offspeed stuff isn't there yet.

JC Encarnacion - Let's face it, the guy has huge mechanical issues, both in the box and at 3B. But despite that, his raw athleticism, eye-hand, and power stand out. If his skills ever catch up with his talents, watch out. 

Matthias Dietz - the ultimate long-shot, and he's going to take a long time, but the guy can hold upper 90s with life and flashes two above average offspeed pitches. Yeah, the delivery is a mess, and he couldn't throw strikes at all for half the season. But if things do happen to click, he arguably has the best stuff in the organization. 

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1 hour ago, Frobby said:

In each case, I’d put the odds of the player becoming a star at 25% or less.    If we get 1-2 stars from that group, we will have done well.

I would take that, better than having a top 30 and get nothing from it.

The Org has been lacking in producing stars, and anybody making it, will be a welcome addition.

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10 minutes ago, Luke-OH said:

Guys who also have an impact ceiling IMO, although they are longer shots.

Brenan Hanifee - Never underestimate what plus command and solid stuff can do, those types of prospects are continuously underrated. Hanifee looks like he could be a future plus command guy, the strikeouts aren't there yet because he throws a sinker (which actually misses a lot of bats for a sinker) and his offspeed stuff isn't there yet.

JC Encarnacion - Let's face it, the guy has huge mechanical issues, both in the box and at 3B. But despite that, his raw athleticism, eye-hand, and power stand out. If his skills ever catch up with his talents, watch out. 

Matthias Dietz - the ultimate long-shot, and he's going to take a long time, but the guy can hold upper 90s with life and flashes two above average offspeed pitches. Yeah, the delivery is a mess, and he couldn't throw strikes at all for half the season. But if things do happen to click, he arguably has the best stuff in the organization. 

I nearly put Hanifee on my list.    I see your point about the other two, though I think their performance lags their potential by enough that I wouldn’t include them.   

The other guy I’m keeping my eye on is Dean Kremer.   Led the minors in strikeouts and pretty far up the organizational ladder.

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3 minutes ago, Frobby said:

I nearly put Hanifee on my list.    I see your point about the other two, though I think their performance lags their potential by enough that I wouldn’t include them.   

The other guy I’m keeping my eye on is Dean Kremer.   Led the minors in strikeouts and pretty far up the organizational ladder.

I forgot about Kremer in this exercise, but yeah, while he's more mid-rotation, he's young enough that if his changeup continues to progress and he gets closer to his relief velocities on his high spin FB, he'd have some significant ceiling as well. 

The lack of CH is the main reason he hasn't gotten more press as many scouts think he's destined for the pen. The changeup had it's moments in his time with Bowie and was definitely improved from video I'd watched from multiple early season starts. So that's interesting. He was 90-94mph as a starter with Bowie, but I've read that he was more 94-97 in multi inning relief. 

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2 hours ago, Frobby said:

OK.    So the operative question is who in our system has the potential to become, not just an everyday player, but a star.   I’ll start with the point that nobody knows for sure.    People who are projected as possible stars sometimes don’t realize that potential, and sometimes guys who didn’t seem to have great potential do become stars.   With that, here’s who I’d put on my list of potential stars:

- Hays

- Hall

- Diaz

- Mountcastle

- Rodriguez

In each case, I’d put the odds of the player becoming a star at 25% or less.    If we get 1-2 stars from that group, we will have done well.

Are DHs stars?  Mountcastle could be a heck on a hitter but so far he sounds like a DH.

Harvey has the stuff to be a star if his body will jump cooperate.

I hope the O's can add Witt and VVM.  I think Witt is a like star.   VVM may be defensively but I am not sure about his offense.

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