Jump to content
Bahama O's Fan

Anyone Following Manny? (Signs with San Diego)

Recommended Posts

20 minutes ago, Redskins Rick said:

For me that era was the mid 60s to early 70s.

4x 20 game winners on the same team.

ERAs in the sub 2s and lower.

A ton of HOF players came out of that ERA.

 

Whenever the Orioles are good are the “good ole days.”

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Redskins Rick said:

For me that era was the mid 60s to early 70s.

4x 20 game winners on the same team.

ERAs in the sub 2s and lower.

A ton of HOF players came out of that ERA.

 

The writers always did have problems differentiating contextual effects and talent.  Make the strike zone three acres and the mound 11' tall and inevitably somebody writes an article about how deep the pitching talent suddenly is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, DrungoHazewood said:

The writers always did have problems differentiating contextual effects and talent.  Make the strike zone three acres and the mound 11' tall and inevitably somebody writes an article about how deep the pitching talent suddenly is.

Maybe the strike zone was actually the strike zone back then. :)

Now adays they want the pitcher to hit a moving target the size of a doughnut. :)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, El Gordo said:

At least 4 of which are Boras creations passed on by his shill Heyman.

Yeah that is what I thought when I read about the mystery team.  But Heyman did say he couldn't figure out whom the mystery team was talking to his sources.  So I am sure you are right. Boras is good at getting teams to bid against themselves.  If I were a team I would give these guys a deadline.  If you don't pick someone by the end of the week the offer comes off the table and we will be moving forward without the player.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Redskins Rick said:

Maybe the strike zone was actually the strike zone back then. :)

Now adays they want the pitcher to hit a moving target the size of a doughnut. :)

All I'm saying is that if you took today's pitchers and gave them the 1966 Dodger Stadium mound and a bottom-of-knees to top-of-shoulders strike zone the league ERA would be about 1.75 and people would talk about how expansion diluted hitting.

The 1920s and 1930s were well above average compared to historical offensive levels.  There are 57 hitters from that era in the Hall (min 1000 PAs) and just 18 pitchers (min 100 games).  Is that because nobody born from 1900-20 could pitch at the very moment where countless great hitters were born?  No, I'm pretty sure it's because the writers have never been any good at adjusting anything for context.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, DrungoHazewood said:

All I'm saying is that if you took today's pitchers and gave them the 1966 Dodger Stadium mound and a bottom-of-knees to top-of-shoulders strike zone the league ERA would be about 1.75 and people would talk about how expansion diluted hitting.

The 1920s and 1930s were well above average compared to historical offensive levels.  There are 57 hitters from that era in the Hall (min 1000 PAs) and just 18 pitchers (min 100 games).  Is that because nobody born from 1900-20 could pitch at the very moment where countless great hitters were born?  No, I'm pretty sure it's because the writers have never been any good at adjusting anything for context.

Yet, Ted Williams could hit .400 with those conditions. :)

But, i dont disagree with your points either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Redskins Rick said:

Yet, Ted Williams could hit .400 with those conditions. :)

But, i dont disagree with your points either.

The strike zone has been re-defined in the Rule Book several times, not even getting into how the umpires have chosen to deviate from what the Rule Book says.   In 1963, the upper end of the strike zone was changed from the armpit to the top of the shoulder.    In 1969 it was changed back.    Then in 1988 it was changed to the midpoint between the top of the shoulders and the belt line.   The bottom end has changed a few times between the top of the knee, to just the knee, to now the bottom of the knee.   

Full summary here:  http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/official_info/umpires/strike_zone.jsp

The 1963-68 strike zone was really pitcher-friendly.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Frobby said:

The strike zone has been re-defined in the Rule Book several times, not even getting into how the umpires have chosen to deviate from what the Rule Book says.   In 1963, the upper end of the strike zone was changed from the armpit to the top of the shoulder.    In 1969 it was changed back.    Then in 1988 it was changed to the midpoint between the top of the shoulders and the belt line.   The bottom end has changed a few times between the top of the knee, to just the knee, to now the bottom of the knee.   

Full summary here:  http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/official_info/umpires/strike_zone.jsp

The 1963-68 strike zone was really pitcher-friendly.  

I understand your points.

But, I will say, that even with the redesign rule book, the umpires do not call balls & strikes based on that, and can be very inconsistent in the middle of the game.

I do not expect perfection, but a little consistency too much to ask?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Redskins Rick said:

I understand your points.

But, I will say, that even with the redesign rule book, the umpires do not call balls & strikes based on that, and can be very inconsistent in the middle of the game.

I do not expect perfection, but a little consistency too much to ask?

I think that with the degree of immediate feedback they get on their performance they are probably more accurate now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 60's are often regarded as the greatest era for pitching, yet Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, Frank Robinson, Hank Aaron and Stan the Man did ok.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, El Gordo said:

The 60's are often regarded as the greatest era for pitching, yet Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, Frank Robinson, Hank Aaron and Stan the Man did ok.

In 1968, Frank played with blurry vision and “only” put up an .834 OPS, but that was good for a 153 OPS+ because the hitting was so diluted that year.   Two years later, after they changed the strike zone and lowered the mound, Frank posted a 151 OPS+, but this time it took a raw OPS of .918 to do it.    

Ted Williams retired after the 1960 season, Stan Musial after 1963.   The strike zone was altered in the pitchers’ favor in ‘63, so Ted didn’t see it and Musial only saw it for a year.  

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Can_of_corn said:

I think that with the degree of immediate feedback they get on their performance they are probably more accurate now.

Good point, the capabilities of todays TV cameras are heads and tails above what they used to have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Frobby said:

   

Ted Williams retired after the 1960 season, Stan Musial after 1963.   The strike zone was altered in the pitchers’ favor in ‘63, so Ted didn’t see it and Musial only saw it for a year.  

Didnt not know that. thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Frobby said:

In 1968, Frank played with blurry vision and “only” put up an .834 OPS, but that was good for a 153 OPS+ because the hitting was so diluted that year.   Two years later, after they changed the strike zone and lowered the mound, Frank posted a 151 OPS+, but this time it took a raw OPS of .918 to do it.    

Ted Williams retired after the 1960 season, Stan Musial after 1963.   The strike zone was altered in the pitchers’ favor in ‘63, so Ted didn’t see it and Musial only saw it for a year.  

Alright. But still Mickey , Hank, Frank,  Roberto, Mays, McCovey, Killebrew, Conigliaro, Carl Yastrzemski, Orlando Cepeda, Dick Allen, Willie McCovey, Ernie Banks, , Al Kaline, Frank Howard, Ron Santo, Lou Brock, Vada Pinson, Jimmy Wynn, Ken Boyer  did OK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

Orioles Information


Orioles News and Information

Daily Organizational Boxscores

News

Tony's Takes

Orioles Roster Resource

Orioles Prospect Information

2018 End of Season Top 30 Prospects List

Prospect Scouting Reports

Statistics

2019 Orioles Stats

2019 Orioles Minor League Stats

Baseball Savant Stats







×
×
  • Create New...