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Rule 5 eligible players

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23 hours ago, 7Mo said:

Adding info on Robson:

Scouting grades: Hit: 50 | Power: 30 | Run: 65 | Arm: 45 | Field: 50 | Overall: 40

The Tigers made Robson their eighth-round pick in the 2016 Draft after an injury-plagued career at Mississippi State that included a broken hand as a redshirt junior. Pegged by the organization as a breakout candidate ahead of his first full season, Robson did just that by reaching the Florida State League and finishing third in the system in batting average (.305) and fifth in stolen bases (21). The Ontario native then built upon the performance in 2018, hitting both for average and even some power as he climbed from Double-A to Triple-A.

Robson's best tool is his speed and it allows him to be a basestealing threat as well as a defensive asset in the outfield. He has played all three spots thus far, with his best chance to be a regular coming in center or left, where his fringy arm would be acceptable. He has shown a solid approach at the plate and a willingness to draw walks, and he added some power to his game in 2018 with career-high totals in home runs (11) and doubles (29), albeit at the cost of more strikeouts (140). The Tigers continue to stress bunting as a tool to help him let his legs do the talking.

Robson profiles best as a fourth outfielder or bench presence, one whose speed can do a lot of things. If he can continue to refine his approach and get on base, he could be a table-setting type at the highest level.

https://baseballsavant.mlb.com/savant-player/jacob-robson-615699?stats=career-r-hitting-milb

It looks like Robson may have more to offer on the offensive side of the game than first expected, though. Here’s what Emily Waldon of The Athletic had to say in her preseason Tigers Top 30 Prospects list:

With his defensive instincts already common knowledge, the more refreshing aspect to Robson’s season was his deceptive push of raw power. At 5-foot-10, you wouldn’t predict that, but his natural eye at the plate complemented the added power on contact.

As the numbers referenced earlier would indicate, Robson utilized a newfound power stroke in 2018. If this new facet of his game is for real, that would obviously boost his value immensely. There will always be a place in the game for players with both power and speed. Even if he only makes minimal contact, that combination of attributes makes for a decent bench piece.

a look at his batting average on balls in play would indicate that, to a certain extent, Robson was getting lucky in 2018. An normal batting average on balls in play would hover around .300. Speedsters generally are able to pad that number thanks to their ability to beat out throws. Robson’s figures, though, were very high. He put up rates of .382 and .406 in 2018. Frankly, those are inflated and unsustainable. As they normalize, the rest of his stats will obviously suffer. To what extent, though, will determine his role.

Finally, while his speed makes him an asset on defense, his arm limits his defensive flexibility to center and left. It’s far from a death knell as a prospect, and he doesn’t profile well in right field offensively anyway, but it does limit his versatility.

https://www.blessyouboys.com/2019/1/25/17048116/detroit-tigers-scouting-report-jake-robson-farm-system

Isn’t another fourth OF the last thing we need?

how about a first third baseman/2nd baseman/SS?

Having said that, if this guy is better than what we have, sure why not.

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1 hour ago, doccat said:

Didn't see this guy posted anywhere?

 

http://www.milb.com/player/index.jsp?player_id=670351#/career/R/hitting/2019/MINORS

 

Any thoughts?

 

He certainly posted big numbers and I'm not fluent in comparing leagues but it's obvious that the PCL is a huge hitters league. 

I don't know anything about this guy other than the numbers. But yesterday Luke said this, which would cause me to question a few things:

"Remember that .900 OPS in the PCL is equivalent to .740 in the Eastern League due to hitting environment. It's still good, but not crazy." 

Rojas had an OPS of .938 with 31 home runs. Taylor Ward, another third baseman on the same team had arguably better numbers. 

Thanks for the post and it's an interesting name to take a look at. 

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27 minutes ago, 7Mo said:

He certainly posted big numbers and I'm not fluent in comparing leagues but it's obvious that the PCL is a huge hitters league. 

I don't know anything about this guy other than the numbers. But yesterday Luke said this, which would cause me to question a few things:

"Remember that .900 OPS in the PCL is equivalent to .740 in the Eastern League due to hitting environment. It's still good, but not crazy." 

Rojas had an OPS of .938 with 31 home runs. Taylor Ward, another third baseman on the same team had arguably better numbers. 

Thanks for the post and it's an interesting name to take a look at. 

Rojas had a .935 OPS in the Southern League in 2018.

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Here’s a guy, Ljay Newsome.

He’s kind of like a RH version of Lowther. Whippy arm action, 89-93, solid command, none of the secondaries are as good as Lowther’s curveball but there is a workable 4 pitch mix.

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10 hours ago, POR said:

Rojas had a .935 OPS in the Southern League in 2018.

He’s hit at every level, he’s also been 2 years older than most prospects at each level. I think he’ll hit some in the majors. I just don’t know if he plays passable defense at 3B or 2B. There are better bats out there IMO if you want a 1B/DH type.  Huge power types like Ramos,  Gittens, etc. or bat control/approach types like Nogowski or Filia.

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Rojas also played at one of the more hitter friendly stadiums in both the PCL and the Southern League, so you should probably discount his stats a little bit further from their league-wide level. Although his numbers were still good at both levels, they were markedly better at home than on the road.

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10 hours ago, Luke-OH said:

Here’s a guy, Ljay Newsome.

He’s kind of like a RH version of Lowther. Whippy arm action, 89-93, solid command, none of the secondaries are as good as Lowther’s curveball but there is a workable 4 pitch mix.

And a Maryland guy born in LaPlata, not that that's a big factor. 

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8 minutes ago, 7Mo said:

And a Maryland guy born in LaPlata, not that that's a big factor. 

He strikes me as a guy the DD regime would pick, but not someone Elias would pick. 

  • Upvote 2

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On 11/26/2019 at 10:52 PM, Luke-OH said:

Here’s a guy, Ljay Newsome.

He’s kind of like a RH version of Lowther. Whippy arm action, 89-93, solid command, none of the secondaries are as good as Lowther’s curveball but there is a workable 4 pitch mix.

I would love to see Ljay come home!  My son played with and against him growing up.  High quality kid who throws strikes.  Very coachable and will out perform expectations in my less than knowledgeable opinion.  

 

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37 minutes ago, Cavspider said:

I would love to see Ljay come home!  My son played with and against him growing up.  High quality kid who throws strikes.  Very coachable and will out perform expectations in my less than knowledgeable opinion.  

 

He doesn't walk guys.   That's a huge plus.    Very good walk/9 IP numbers.   And averages a K/inning.   

Having only watched a little video, I still want Rojas.   Especially if we lose Villar....

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On 11/23/2019 at 12:09 PM, 7Mo said:

Adding info on Robson:

Scouting grades: Hit: 50 | Power: 30 | Run: 65 | Arm: 45 | Field: 50 | Overall: 40

The Tigers made Robson their eighth-round pick in the 2016 Draft after an injury-plagued career at Mississippi State that included a broken hand as a redshirt junior. Pegged by the organization as a breakout candidate ahead of his first full season, Robson did just that by reaching the Florida State League and finishing third in the system in batting average (.305) and fifth in stolen bases (21). The Ontario native then built upon the performance in 2018, hitting both for average and even some power as he climbed from Double-A to Triple-A.

Robson's best tool is his speed and it allows him to be a basestealing threat as well as a defensive asset in the outfield. He has played all three spots thus far, with his best chance to be a regular coming in center or left, where his fringy arm would be acceptable. He has shown a solid approach at the plate and a willingness to draw walks, and he added some power to his game in 2018 with career-high totals in home runs (11) and doubles (29), albeit at the cost of more strikeouts (140). The Tigers continue to stress bunting as a tool to help him let his legs do the talking.

Robson profiles best as a fourth outfielder or bench presence, one whose speed can do a lot of things. If he can continue to refine his approach and get on base, he could be a table-setting type at the highest level.

https://baseballsavant.mlb.com/savant-player/jacob-robson-615699?stats=career-r-hitting-milb

It looks like Robson may have more to offer on the offensive side of the game than first expected, though. Here’s what Emily Waldon of The Athletic had to say in her preseason Tigers Top 30 Prospects list:

With his defensive instincts already common knowledge, the more refreshing aspect to Robson’s season was his deceptive push of raw power. At 5-foot-10, you wouldn’t predict that, but his natural eye at the plate complemented the added power on contact.

As the numbers referenced earlier would indicate, Robson utilized a newfound power stroke in 2018. If this new facet of his game is for real, that would obviously boost his value immensely. There will always be a place in the game for players with both power and speed. Even if he only makes minimal contact, that combination of attributes makes for a decent bench piece.

a look at his batting average on balls in play would indicate that, to a certain extent, Robson was getting lucky in 2018. An normal batting average on balls in play would hover around .300. Speedsters generally are able to pad that number thanks to their ability to beat out throws. Robson’s figures, though, were very high. He put up rates of .382 and .406 in 2018. Frankly, those are inflated and unsustainable. As they normalize, the rest of his stats will obviously suffer. To what extent, though, will determine his role.

Finally, while his speed makes him an asset on defense, his arm limits his defensive flexibility to center and left. It’s far from a death knell as a prospect, and he doesn’t profile well in right field offensively anyway, but it does limit his versatility.

https://www.blessyouboys.com/2019/1/25/17048116/detroit-tigers-scouting-report-jake-robson-farm-system

 

I appreciate your effort on this piece. The last two years he's hit around 10 bombs in 200-250 ABs. I'd be okay with this selection as we need surplus talent at any position.

I'd prefer guys who have a better chance to stick over long shots.

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32 minutes ago, Roll Tide said:

 

I appreciate your effort on this piece. The last two years he's hit around 10 bombs in 200-250 ABs. I'd be okay with this selection as we need surplus talent at any position.

I'd prefer guys who have a better chance to stick over long shots.

He's no where close to the top of the list IMO but I thought adding information wouldn't hurt the discussion.

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On 11/26/2019 at 10:52 PM, Luke-OH said:

Here’s a guy, Ljay Newsome.

He’s kind of like a RH version of Lowther. Whippy arm action, 89-93, solid command, none of the secondaries are as good as Lowther’s curveball but there is a workable 4 pitch mix.

I read that Newsome led all MiLB pitchers in strike throwing percentage at 73% as well as lowest walk percentage at 2.7% in 2019.

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37 minutes ago, Beef Supreme said:

I read that Newsome led all MiLB pitchers in strike throwing percentage at 73% as well as lowest walk percentage at 2.7% in 2019.

Of guys throwing 100+ innings, yes. 

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