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11 minutes ago, Natty said:

The Rays used 9 pitchers in last nights playoff game. 

The Orioles used 4 pitchers total in winning the 1966 World Series. 

Thank god for Moe Drabowsky!

5-2, 6-0, 1-0, 1-0. Vs. Drysdale, Koufax, Osteen, and Drysdale. Three whole seasons before 1969-71.

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4 minutes ago, LA2 said:

Thank god for Moe Drabowsky!

5-2, 6-0, 1-0, 1-0. Vs. Drysdale, Koufax, Osteen, and Drysdale. Three whole seasons before 1969-71.

Yep, McNally gave up 2 runs and only pitched 2.1 innings in game 1. Drabowsky came in and pitched the rest of the game and allowed 1 hit with 11 Strikeouts. McNally came back and pitched a shutout in game 4 to clinch the Series. 

The 4 pitchers were Dave McNally, Moe Drabowsky, Wally Bunker, Jim Palmer. 

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20 minutes ago, Natty said:

 

The Rays used 9 pitchers in last nights playoff game. 

The Orioles used 4 pitchers total in winning the 1966 World Series. 

 

 

 

7 minutes ago, LA2 said:

 

Thank god for Moe Drabowsky !!!

5-2, 6-0, 1-0, and 1-0. vs. Drysdale, Koufax, Osteen, and Drysdale. Three whole seasons before 1969-71.

 

o

 

Dave McNally, the man who needed the bailing out from Drabowsky in Game One, pitched a CG-Shutout on 3 days' rest in Game Four ........ the first thing that comes to mind in relatively recent anomalies such as this is when Josh Becket did just that in Game 6 of the 2003 World Series for the Marlins against the Yankees.

 

https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/NYA/NYA200310250.shtml

 

Unlike McNally, who was taken out early in Game One in favor of Drabowsky in 1966, Beckett had pitched 7.33 innings in his previous game (Game 3), throwing 108 pitches in the process ........ so veteran manager Jack McKeon as really going out on a limb by gambling with Beckett on 3 days' rest in 2003, particularly considering the fact that the climate in regard to the treatment of starting pitchers was very much like it is now (closely followed pitch-counts, very rarely having starting pitchers throwing complete-games, rarely having starting pitchers going on 3 days' rest, etc.)

 

o

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This is mine.

https://sabr.org/gamesproj/game/july-13-1991-four-orioles-pitchers-combine-no-hitter-against

Quote

On July 13, 1991, the Baltimore Orioles celebrated “a baseball version of finding a million dollars lying in the street.”1 Four Baltimore pitchers combined to no-hit the Oakland Athletics on a Saturday afternoon at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, before a crowd of 40,047, in a game that was termed “downright freaky.”2

 

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10 minutes ago, OFFNY said:

 

 

o

 

Dave McNally, the man who needed the bailing out from Drabowsky in Game One, pitched a CG-Shutout on 3 days' rest in Game Four ........ the first thing that comes to mind in relatively recent anomalies such as this is when Josh Becket did just that in Game 6 of the 2003 World Series for the Marlins against the Yankees.

 

https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/NYA/NYA200310250.shtml

 

Unlike McNally, who was taken out early in Game One in favor of Drabowsky in 1966, Beckett had pitched 7.33 innings in his previous game (Game 3), throwing 108 pitches in the process ........ so veteran manager Jack McKeon as really going out on a limb by gambling with Beckett on 3 days' rest in 2003, particularly considering the fact that the climate in regard to the treatment of starting pitchers was very much like it is now (closely followed pitch-counts, very rarely having starting pitchers throwing complete-games, rarely having starting pitchers going on 3 days' rest, etc.)

 

o

Baseball sure has changed.

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8 minutes ago, OFFNY said:

Unlike McNally, who was taken out early in Game One in favor of Drabowsky in 1966, Beckett had pitched 7.33 innings in his previous game (Game 3), throwing 108 pitches in the process ........ so veteran manager Jack McKeon as really going out on a limb by gambling with Beckett on 3 days' rest in 2003, particularly considering the fact that the climate in regard to the treatment of starting pitchers was very much like it is now (closely followed pitch-counts, very rarely having starting pitchers throwing complete-games, rarely having starting pitchers going on 3 days' rest, etc.)

I remember Lonborg, McLain and Lolich all pitching on 2 days’ rest in the ‘67 and ‘68 World Series.    
 

Lonborg - complete game on Oct. 9 and 6 innings on Oct. 12.

McLain - 2.2 innings on Oct. 6 and complete game on Oct. 9.

Lolich - complete games on Oct. 7 and 10.     
 

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1 hour ago, LA2 said:

Thank god for Moe Drabowsky!

5-2, 6-0, 1-0, 1-0. Vs. Drysdale, Koufax, Osteen, and Drysdale. Three whole seasons before 1969-71.

Happy to say I was there for game 3, Bunker's masterpiece supported by a Paul Blair solo home run. 

As the billboard on E. 33rd St. said (in it's best Maxwell Smart),

Would you believe four straight?

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1 hour ago, OFFNY said:

o

 

Dave McNally, the man who needed the bailing out from Drabowsky in Game One, pitched a CG-Shutout on 3 days' rest in Game Four ........ the first thing that comes to mind in relatively recent anomalies such as this is when Josh Becket did just that in Game 6 of the 2003 World Series for the Marlins against the Yankees.

 

https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/NYA/NYA200310250.shtml

 

Unlike McNally, who was taken out early in Game One in favor of Drabowsky in 1966, Beckett had pitched 7.33 innings in his previous game (Game 3), throwing 108 pitches in the process ........ so veteran manager Jack McKeon as really going out on a limb by gambling with Beckett on 3 days' rest in 2003, particularly considering the fact that the climate in regard to the treatment of starting pitchers was very much like it is now (closely followed pitch-counts, very rarely having starting pitchers throwing complete-games, rarely having starting pitchers going on 3 days' rest, etc.)

 

o

 

 

45 minutes ago, Frobby said:

 

I remember Lonborg, McLain, and Lolich all pitching on 2 days rest in the 67 and 68 World Series.    
 

Lonborg - complete game on October 9th, and 6 innings on Oct.ober 12th.

McLain - 2.67 innings on October 6th, and complete game on October 9th.

Lolich - complete games on October 7th and 10th.    
 

o

 

Not only did Lolich pitch those 2 complete games in that 1968 World Series, he also pitched (and won) a 3rd complete game on October 3rd ....... so he pitched a Complete Game in Game Two (October 3rd), another Complete Game in on 3 days' rest in Game Five (October 7th), and yet another Complete Game on 2 days' rest in Game Seven (October 10th.) ) O.o

 

o

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59 minutes ago, Frobby said:

I remember Lonborg, McLain and Lolich all pitching on 2 days’ rest in the ‘67 and ‘68 World Series.    
 

Lonborg - complete game on Oct. 9 and 6 innings on Oct. 12.

McLain - 2.2 innings on Oct. 6 and complete game on Oct. 9.

Lolich - complete games on Oct. 7 and 10.     
 

That kind of thing became rare after the 1964 Phillies collapse.  Gene Mauch started Jim Bunning nine times in September, including three times on two days rest  On September 16th he started on two days rest after throwing a 10-inning complete game.  Going into September Bunning was 14-4, 2.17.  In September he was 4-4, 4.68, and 0-3 on two days rest.

On September 17th the Phils were 6.5 games up in the standings.  They lost 12 of their next 13, mostly with Bunning on short or very short rest, and ended up in 2nd place.

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I've only heard this anecdotally, and not quite sure how to research, but a friend who I think wasn't imagining it said one of the years around the great late '60's/early 70's run there was an offseason without any 40-man roster changes.

Would have to imagine it was around time of Bobby Grich and Don Baylor's magnificent AAA runs.

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11 minutes ago, DrungoHazewood said:

That kind of thing became rare after the 1964 Phillies collapse.  Gene Mauch started Jim Bunning nine times in September, including three times on two days rest  On September 16th he started on two days rest after throwing a 10-inning complete game.  Going into September Bunning was 14-4, 2.17.  In September he was 4-4, 4.68, and 0-3 on two days rest.

On September 17th the Phils were 6.5 games up in the standings.  They lost 12 of their next 13, mostly with Bunning on short or very short rest, and ended up in 2nd place.

Koufax, on the other hand, made 9 starts and a relief appearance in Sept./Oct. 1965, pitching to a 1.51 ERA.   His 9 starts included 6 complete games, one of which he lost after pitching 10.2 innings.   
 

There’s a reason Koufax had to retire at age 30.    Walter Alston absolutely abused him.   

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13 minutes ago, OrioleDog said:

I've only heard this anecdotally, and not quite sure how to research, but a friend who I think wasn't imagining it said one of the years around the great late '60's/early 70's run there was an offseason without any 40-man roster changes.

Would have to imagine it was around time of Bobby Grich and Don Baylor's magnificent AAA runs.

Might have been true between 1969 and 1970.    The O’s bought and sold a couple of players that winter, but maybe not anyone on the 40-man roster.   
https://www.baseball-reference.com/teams/BAL/1969-transactions.shtml

https://www.baseball-reference.com/teams/BAL/1970-transactions.shtml

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