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Frobby

Chris Davis, 2020

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11 hours ago, Es4M11 said:

I'm hoping for .239 avg and 29 hr -- no more, lest I have to eat a flip flop

Just make a meatloaf in the shape of a flip flop. It's a win-win!

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11 hours ago, Babypowder said:

There is no scenario where I want Davis to play everyday and finish his contract. I'm hoping for two outcomes: 1. He is just as bad as he has been, barely plays and finally gets cut. 2. He plays well enough to get moved and the O's get out of any portion of his deal and younger players can play.

You’ve mentioned a couple times that you hoped Davis can play well enough this year to be moved. But I know and you know (and I know you know) there is absolutely no scenario in which that happens, given his past performance, current contract and this team’s inability/unwillingness to eat salary. Even if his OPS is .900 in July, nobody is buying high at $17M a year. Which leaves: (1) he plays well enough over the coming years to finish his deal; (2) he gets cut and the team eats the salary; or (3) he retires and forgoes the rest of his salary. That’s really it. I hope for #1, but the odds say that #2/3 are far more likely. 

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12 minutes ago, InsideCoroner said:

You’ve mentioned a couple times that you hoped Davis can play well enough this year to be moved. But I know and you know (and I know you know) there is absolutely no scenario in which that happens, given his past performance, current contract and this team’s inability/unwillingness to eat salary. Even if his OPS is .900 in July, nobody is buying high at $17M a year. Which leaves: (1) he plays well enough over the coming years to finish his deal; (2) he gets cut and the team eats the salary; or (3) he retires and forgoes the rest of his salary. That’s really it. I hope for #1, but the odds say that #2/3 are far more likely. 

The hoped for option is (4) Davis performs well enough that another team would trade for him if the O’s ate most but not all of his salary.    I don’t see why the team wouldn’t be willing to do it if Davis played well enough to make it feasible.   I just don’t think he’ll be able to do that.    

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2 minutes ago, Frobby said:

The hoped for option is (4) Davis performs well enough that another team would trade for him if the O’s ate most but not all of his salary.    I don’t see why the team wouldn’t be willing to do it if Davis played well enough to make it feasible.   I just don’t think he’ll be able to do that.    

The public relation hit, his lack of versatility, his trade protection, prior PED use, contract existing beyond this season.

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19 minutes ago, Can_of_corn said:

The public relation hit, his lack of versatility, his trade protection, prior PED use, contract existing beyond this season.

I’m talking about the Orioles being willing to do it.    Inside Coroner had posited that the O’s were unwilling or unable to eat salary to facilitate a trade and that was one of the reason that option was off the table.    I think they’d be both willing and able to do it.     The problem would be the lack of takers, not the Orioles.    But if Davis truly has a .900 OPS in July — which is the hypothetical under discussion — there might be a taker if we ate enough of the remaining salary.    Frankly, I’m more likely to see a unicorn than for Davis to have a .900 OPS in July.    

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9 hours ago, Frobby said:

I’m talking about the Orioles being willing to do it.    Inside Coroner had posited that the O’s were unwilling or unable to eat salary to facilitate a trade and that was one of the reason that option was off the table.    I think they’d be both willing and able to do it.     The problem would be the lack of takers, not the Orioles.    But if Davis truly has a .900 OPS in July — which is the hypothetical under discussion — there might be a taker if we ate enough of the remaining salary.    Frankly, I’m more likely to see a unicorn than for Davis to have a .900 OPS in July.    

Even if he has a .900 OPS in July........I think all the dumb GMs of years past who would make those types of deals are long gone.

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7 minutes ago, Mr. Chewbacca Jr. said:

Even if he has a .900 OPS in July........I think all the dumb GMs of years past who would make those types of deals are long gone.

Not all the owners though. 

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9 minutes ago, Mr. Chewbacca Jr. said:

Even if he has a .900 OPS in July........I think all the dumb GMs of years past who would make those types of deals are long gone.

It might not be dumb, depending on the situation and how much salary the Orioles eat.   But I’m not going to waste my time arguing about hypotheticals that are extremely unlikely to happen.     

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11 hours ago, InsideCoroner said:

You’ve mentioned a couple times that you hoped Davis can play well enough this year to be moved. But I know and you know (and I know you know) there is absolutely no scenario in which that happens, given his past performance, current contract and this team’s inability/unwillingness to eat salary. Even if his OPS is .900 in July, nobody is buying high at $17M a year. Which leaves: (1) he plays well enough over the coming years to finish his deal; (2) he gets cut and the team eats the salary; or (3) he retires and forgoes the rest of his salary. That’s really it. I hope for #1, but the odds say that #2/3 are far more likely. 

If someone takes him and the O's eat 90 percent of his salary, that's still a win. I think it is a near impossibility too but as I said: a man can dream.

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