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[FanGraphs] Trey Mancini talks Hitting with David Laurila

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I wonder why Laurila sat on that interview for five months?    It’s pretty enlightening.  And I love Trey.    

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I really like Trey also, I guess because he reminds me of some of the real good hitters I learned about in the 40s and 50s.  I say learned about because for me it was a static filled radio, no TV until 1951 or so and then super rarely to have more than a game or two on per week, and nearly always   teams I did not really care about.  . That interview shows that he is a bright, disciplined, ball player with a 1950s work ethic.  I wish him the best, knowing he probably will be traded for Prospects, but I think he would make a near perfect mentor for his teammates, both younger and older than he is.  

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4 minutes ago, Oriole1940 said:

I really like Trey also, I guess because he reminds me of some of the real good hitters I learned about in the 40s and 50s.  I say learned about because for me it was a static filled radio, no TV until 1951 or so and then super rarely to have more than a game or two on per week, and nearly always   teams I did not really care about.  . That interview shows that he is a bright, disciplined, ball player with a 1950s work ethic.  I wish him the best, knowing he probably will be traded for Prospects, but I think he would make a near perfect mentor for his teammates, both younger and older than he is.  

You think guys in the 50's worked harder than today's players?

You have seen how a whole bunch of these guys have spent the offseason improving their games right?

I think a '50's work ethic would include showing up to camp out of shape, not lifting weights and getting drunk on a regular basis during the season.  They most certainly didn't spend time in the video room breaking down footage.

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12 minutes ago, Can_of_corn said:

You think guys in the 50's worked harder than today's players?

You have seen how a whole bunch of these guys have spent the offseason improving their games right?

I think a '50's work ethic would include showing up to camp out of shape, not lifting weights and getting drunk on a regular basis during the season.  They most certainly didn't spend time in the video room breaking down footage.

Yeah, a 50s work ethic was tough because most guys had to work a second job all offseason. Spring training was where you got in shape. Now we have fans complaining because a guy lifted weights all offseason but didn’t go to some specialized swing academy. 

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31 minutes ago, Can_of_corn said:

You think guys in the 50's worked harder than today's players?

You have seen how a whole bunch of these guys have spent the offseason improving their games right?

I think a '50's work ethic would include showing up to camp out of shape, not lifting weights and getting drunk on a regular basis during the season.  They most certainly didn't spend time in the video room breaking down footage.

One of my favorite anecdotes from The Boys of Summer was the Dodgers had a player, George Shuba, who Roger Kahn covered as a reporter who he always thought had a beautiful, natural swing.    Years later he visited the player (long retired) and he showed him his basement where he used to swing a 44-ounce bat at knots on a rope hanging from the ceiling 600  times a night to hone his swing.    So much for “natural!”    My point is that there have always been players who worked very hard at their craft.     It’s a very competitive environment.    

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14 minutes ago, Frobby said:

One of my favorite anecdotes from The Boys of Summer was the Dodgers had a player who Roger Kahn covered as a reporter who he always thought had a beautiful, natural swing.    Years later he visited the player (long retired) and he showed him his basement where he used to swing a very heavy axe 1,000 times a night to hone his swing.    So much for “natural!”    My point is that there have always been players who worked very hard at their craft.     It’s a very competitive environment.    

Obviously exceptions exist on both ends of the spectrum.  I was speaking of the average player.

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9 minutes ago, Can_of_corn said:

Obviously exceptions exist on both ends of the spectrum.  I was speaking of the average player.

I just liked re-telling that story.    One of the top 10 baseball books ever written, IMO.   Arguably, the best.   

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