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Moose Milligan

Orioles Biggest One Hit Wonder of all time...

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5 hours ago, DrungoHazewood said:

I thought his [Dempsey's] claim to fame was being one of the better defensive catchers in baseball for 20 years? 

Is that rating for real, or just "Catcher's ERA"? (I don't know the answer, just asking.)

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2 minutes ago, now said:

Is that rating for real, or just "Catcher's ERA"? (I don't know the answer, just asking.)

One thing we know for sure, he could throw.  Career 40% CS rate, to include seasons in which he was over 50%.

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3 minutes ago, now said:

Is that rating for real, or just "Catcher's ERA"? (I don't know the answer, just asking.)

I think it's real.  Multiple sources have him pretty highly rated. 

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6 minutes ago, now said:

Is that rating for real, or just "Catcher's ERA"? (I don't know the answer, just asking.)

If nothing else he has the most games caught for the O’s. While his renown is based on the Post season it’s hard to call him a one hit wonder.

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What about Rich Coggins in '73? He hit .319 with an .831 OPS, worth nearly 4 WAR, had a disappointing sophomore season for the Birds (0.2 WAR),  bounced around three teams and was out of baseball by '77.  

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David Newhan. He was a very solid part time starter in 2004 and was hoping he would be a contributor for several seasons. Never replicated his 2004 stat line and was out of the organization after the 2006 season. 

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21 minutes ago, OsFanSinceThe80s said:

David Newhan. He was a very solid part time starter in 2004 and was hoping he would be a contributor for several seasons. Never replicated his 2004 stat line and was out of the organization after the 2006 season.

Newhan is THE poster boy for anything can happen in a small sample of at bats.

Up to the moment he debuted with the Orioles as the age of 30 he had a .550 MLB OPS in 97 PAs, and a mixed record as a journeyman minor leaguer.  From 2005 through the end of his MLB career he OPS'd .629 in the majors.

But... in June of 2004 he went 19-for-43 (.442) with a 1.324 OPS. In July of 2004 he had an .815 OPS, and in August he had a .771.  His first month with the O's he hit over .400 and was basically playing like Ty Cobb.

Remember boys and girls, hitter BABIP takes 800+ PAs to stabilize.

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4 minutes ago, DrungoHazewood said:

Newhan is THE poster boy for anything can happen in a small sample of at bats.

Up to the moment he debuted with the Orioles as the age of 30 he had a .550 MLB OPS in 97 PAs, and a mixed record as a journeyman minor leaguer.  From 2005 through the end of his MLB career he OPS'd .629 in the majors.

But... in June of 2004 he went 19-for-43 (.442) with a 1.324 OPS. In July of 2004 he had an .815 OPS, and in August he had a .771.  His first month with the O's he hit over .400 and was basically playing like Ty Cobb.

Remember boys and girls, hitter BABIP takes 800+ PAs to stabilize.

Yup, after Newhan I learned not to get excited over 400 PAs from a new Oriole. 

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Gotta be Steve Stone. He'd almost never been better than a league average pitcher for his first nine years, and then he has a 25-win season and wins the Cy Young, then is out of baseball within two years.

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1 hour ago, Can_of_corn said:

One thing we know for sure, he could throw.  Career 40% CS rate, to include seasons in which he was over 50%.

You have to compare it to his peers when he was playing.    Dempsey was at 40% in an era when 35% was average.   Bench, 43% when 35% was average.   Pudge Rodriguez, 46% when 31% was average.   Pudge was crazy good.    If you go back to early periods you can find times when the average CS% was over 40%.    For example, Bill Dickey was at 47% when 41% was average.   

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8 minutes ago, Frobby said:

You have to compare it to his peers when he was playing.    Dempsey was at 40% in an era when 35% was average.   Bench, 43% when 35% was average.   Pudge Rodriguez, 46% when 31% was average.   Pudge was crazy good.    If you go back to early periods you can find times when the average CS% was over 40%.    For example, Bill Dickey was at 47% when 41% was average.   

Wow, I had no idea that is how it worked.

Fascinating.

BTW he led the league in CS% in back to back seasons (76-77 {19% above league average}). 

Dempsey's career CS% numbers took a hit due to the longevity of his career.  I've never looked into it, but I imagine most catchers get less effective at throwing out runners when they get into their 30's and Dempsey played into his 40's.

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18 minutes ago, PaulFolk said:

Gotta be Steve Stone. He'd almost never been better than a league average pitcher for his first nine years, and then he has a 25-win season and wins the Cy Young, then is out of baseball within two years.

Threw the curveball even when it hurt. 

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35 minutes ago, Frobby said:

You have to compare it to his peers when he was playing.    Dempsey was at 40% in an era when 35% was average.   Bench, 43% when 35% was average.   Pudge Rodriguez, 46% when 31% was average.   Pudge was crazy good.    If you go back to early periods you can find times when the average CS% was over 40%.    For example, Bill Dickey was at 47% when 41% was average.   

In 1912 the Red Sox had 185 steals and 182 caught.  And they led the league in scoring.

In 1950 the Tigers were 23-of-63 on steals.

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Brad Bergesen would have to make my list.  I know it's kind of unfair considering the circumstances of how his rookie season ended, and then the fluke injury in the offseason, but I have to go off of pure statistics that he never came close to replicating his rookie success.  Not to mention that with his paltry strikeout numbers it's certainly debatable he would have actually come close to it anyway.

Another would be Rocky Coppinger.  Sure he only put up a 1.3 WAR that season, albeit possibly the "greatest" offensive season in MLB history, but he was a producer on a playoff team that never came close to replicating it again.

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