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9/4 Player Pool - Lowther added

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3 minutes ago, Can_of_corn said:

I don't know, some uniformed poster seems to think that just because you are on a major league team you can't do one on one drills to improve your fielding.

I don't understand what they are talking about.

Oookay, you don't know appears to be the correct answer.  What I do know is the discussion got way off track, and the recent posts have absolutely nothing to do with what what was previously being discussed.    

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9 minutes ago, VaBird1 said:

I don’t mean noise, I was referring to the ball.  A grown athlete hitting a fly ball does different things than when someone hits you a fungo.

I mean, nothing's a perfect emulation, but come on - you can certainly do defensive drills outside of a game.  

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Just now, Ruzious said:

 

Oookay, you don't know appears to be the correct answer.  What I do know is the discussion got way off track, and the recent posts have absolutely nothing to do with what what was previously being discussed.    

OK, I'll take it nice and slow for you.

I stated that their is value in getting experience fielding in a ML stadium.  This, if you don't know it, is because ML stadiums are larger than minor league stadiums and have more lighting.

You opined that he could, during a pandemic, simply drive over to OPACY and, I don't know, hit balls to himself?

I suggested that if he was on the ML team he could both practice and play games in a ML stadium.  Which would be more useful to his development than practicing at a MiL park.

 

This board has a mindset that development stops once a player gets to the majors, that somehow things can't get worked on at the ML level.

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7 minutes ago, Can_of_corn said:

OK, I'll take it nice and slow for you.

I stated that their is value in getting experience fielding in a ML stadium.  This, if you don't know it, is because ML stadiums are larger than minor league stadiums and have more lighting.

You opined that he could, during a pandemic, simply drive over to OPACY and, I don't know, hit balls to himself?

I suggested that if he was on the ML team he could both practice and play games in a ML stadium.  Which would be more useful to his development than practicing at a MiL park.

 

This board has a mindset that development stops once a player gets to the majors, that somehow things can't get worked on at the ML level.

Lol, I thought you were joking.  

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14 minutes ago, Ruzious said:

I mean, nothing's a perfect emulation, but come on - you can certainly do defensive drills outside of a game.  

Ok, I disagree 🤷‍♂️

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7 minutes ago, Ruzious said:

Lol, I thought you were joking.  

Sorry, nope.

I think the best place to work on things is in an environment as close to possible as where you will be expected to preform the activity.

In this case, a major league stadium.

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27 minutes ago, Can_of_corn said:

Sorry, nope.

I think the best place to work on things is in an environment as close to possible as where you will be expected to preform the activity.

In this case, a major league stadium.

That's not what I thought the discussion was about.  

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2 minutes ago, Can_of_corn said:

Well that was the discussion I was having.  😉

While in reality it was about Mountcastle - about whether using him at 1st base made sense.  

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On 8/9/2020 at 10:39 AM, Ruzious said:

While in reality it was about Mountcastle - about whether using him at 1st base made sense.  

I don't think he needs to play first base. 

Dan Connolly had this enlightening paragraph today.

Quote

This is where the age-old baseball dilemma comes in: Can rushing a player to the majors before he is ready potentially kill that player’s future?

I used to unequivocally think yes. But I once had an illuminating conversation with former Orioles manager Mike Hargrove, a former AL Rookie of the Year, about this subject. He was the teammate of David Clyde, the former No. 1 overall pick of the Texas Rangers who debuted as an 18-year-old, pitched in parts of five forgettable seasons and didn’t return to the majors after age 24. Derailed by injuries and confidence issues, Clyde is considered the poster boy for the “rushed player.”

But Hargrove contended that if a player isn’t mentally strong enough to handle the inevitable failure at the major-league level at a young age, he wouldn’t be able to handle it a few years later, either. That it’s not the rushing that kills a player’s career, it’s the inability to handle the pressure and confidence breaks. Maybe you gain a little bit more of that as you get older, Hargrove told me, but the ones who stay in the game long-term aren’t just talented players, but ones who continually are beaten down by the game’s difficulty and keep rising to the challenge.

https://theathletic.com/1985038/2020/08/10/the-curious-case-of-promoting-or-waiting-on-os-prospect-ryan-mountcastle/?source=emp_shared_article

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On 8/8/2020 at 1:25 PM, Philip said:

Re: Bleier. If we won’t know the return until October, why continue to argue about it now? Instead let’s argue about the return we’re going to get for the next guy we trade?

We can even have a little raffle to attempt to determine who the next guy traded will be?

Because Elias's return on trades so far at the moment has not been the most spectacular (not saying that we had a lot of value either) so it's quite possible we just traded Bleier for absolutely nothing

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18 minutes ago, weams said:

I don't think he needs to play first base. 

Dan Connolly had this enlightening paragraph today.

https://theathletic.com/1985038/2020/08/10/the-curious-case-of-promoting-or-waiting-on-os-prospect-ryan-mountcastle/?source=emp_shared_article

There's rushing, and then there's rushing.  Clyde made his MLB debut a few weeks after he graduated from high school as a starting pitcher on a 57-105 team. And he still wasn't that bad. 

When we talk about rushing prospects we're usually debating the merits of an extra half-season in AA or something.  The other day we were discussing just how large the step was from AAA to the majors.  David Clyde skipped straight from facing 120 lb 15-year-olds to facing Rod Carew and Tony Oliva the same month.

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5 hours ago, MountUrCastle said:

Because Elias's return on trades so far at the moment has not been the most spectacular (not saying that we had a lot of value either) so it's quite possible we just traded Bleier for absolutely nothing

I understand where you’re coming from, but I think none of Mike’s trades can be evaluated yet, because everybody he got Is far enough away that we can’t evaluate them yet.


edit: that might not be true, he might’ve traded for somebody who is on the team right now, but I can’t think who. Armstrong was a waiver claim, so are our infielders, so was Alberto, Severino,so if he traded for somebody who is expected to be an immediate benefit, who wasn’t, I am not remembering who.

His waiver claims have been pretty good. 

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5 hours ago, DrungoHazewood said:

There's rushing, and then there's rushing.  Clyde made his MLB debut a few weeks after he graduated from high school as a starting pitcher on a 57-105 team. And he still wasn't that bad. 

When we talk about rushing prospects we're usually debating the merits of an extra half-season in AA or something.  The other day we were discussing just how large the step was from AAA to the majors.  David Clyde skipped straight from facing 120 lb 15-year-olds to facing Rod Carew and Tony Oliva the same month.

Yes, and Brad Corbett laughed that the day Clyde debuted, he made back the $30,000 signing bonus in concession sales alone, And Clyde’s career was completely ruined. He was out of baseball in about three years, and he could’ve been a Hall of Famer.

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1 hour ago, Philip said:

I understand where you’re coming from, but I think none of Mike’s trades can be evaluated yet, because everybody he got Is far enough away that we can’t evaluate them yet.


edit: that might not be true, he might’ve traded for somebody who is on the team right now, but I can’t think who. Armstrong was a waiver claim, so are our infielders, so was Alberto, Severino,so if he traded for somebody who is expected to be an immediate benefit, who wasn’t, I am not remembering who.

His waiver claims have been pretty good. 

When you get a pitcher playing in the GCL at 22 years of age for a 3.9 WAR infielder im tempted to say without needing results that it's a bad trade, for example.

 

I get that he was projected to make a lot in arb (and by a lot a whole 8.2 million, crazy!) but I find it tough to believe the market was that cold.

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