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Orioles Beat The Phillies In 10 Innings (8/11)

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Definitely an exciting, fun game but there was a lot of bad baseball last night.  That game was gifted to the Os and they did everything they could to return the gift.

That said, you gotta love the heart of this team.  They aren’t that talented, although there are a few guys who could potential long term pieces, but they give max effort and compete hard.  Hyde has these guys playing well for him right now.  That’s all we can ask for, especially for a team that lacks the horses needed to contend over the long haul.

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2 minutes ago, DrungoHazewood said:

I went to bed after the 9th because nine innings now take four hours and I have to get up for work at six.  But it was a crazy game.

What's the last inside-the-parker for the O's?  I really don't remember.

Andino 

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1 hour ago, DrungoHazewood said:

I went to bed after the 9th because nine innings now take four hours and I have to get up for work at six.  But it was a crazy game.

What's the last inside-the-parker for the O's?  I really don't remember.

Hyde said 2011.    I watched the end of the game, then all of Gloatfest (that’s my name for the postgame show when they win), then 2 hours of TV, and still got up at 6:30.    Stupid, but I was keyed up (also had been working very late).

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2 hours ago, Sports Guy said:

Andino 

I don't know how you call that an inside-the-park home run.  Ellsbury had the ball in his glove and dropped it.  Then the relay skips by the catcher when Andino is still five steps from the plate.  If the same play happened in Boston I think it's a triple and an E-4.

I challenge the board to find me a MLB inside-the-parker in the last 25 years that didn't involve questionable judgment by a fielder and/or dicey work by the official scorer.

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The 1-5 of Alberto Santander Nunez Ruiz and Severino is really fun to watch, and I was always excited for Hays' at bats last night in the seven hole.  Are they all long term pieces?  Too early to tell.  But for this bizarre year, taking everything in a vacuum, that is a fun offense to watch.

 

Hopefully we start seeing more Sisco and Severino alternating behind the plate and the other at DH, with Nunez at 1B.

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14 minutes ago, DrungoHazewood said:

I don't know how you call that an inside-the-park home run.  Ellsbury had the ball in his glove and dropped it.  Then the relay skips by the catcher when Andino is still five steps from the plate.  If the same play happened in Boston I think it's a triple and an E-4.

I challenge the board to find me a MLB inside-the-parker in the last 25 years that didn't involve questionable judgment by a fielder and/or dicey work by the official scorer.

Now none of these have completely clean play from the outfielders but  don't think they especially egregious.

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2 hours ago, DrungoHazewood said:

I went to bed after the 9th because nine innings now take four hours and I have to get up for work at six.  But it was a crazy game.

What's the last inside-the-parker for the O's?  I really don't remember.

Yea I get up at 5, so after they gave up the lead in the 8th I went to bed....but it was fun to watch the highlights this morning!

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47 minutes ago, Can_of_corn said:

Now none of these have completely clean play from the outfielders but  don't think they especially egregious.

Bonifacio's was probably the cleanest.  Those were all pretty good, but every one of them could have been a double or triple if the outfielder had played more conservatively.  They all involved leaping or diving for balls with a fairly small chance of success that turned a fairly routine play into a four base adventure.

I may never see this in my lifetime, but my dream baseball play is a lined shot over the CFers head, bounces to the 465 sign, and a clean relay has no shot at the guy at the plate.

I may be mistaken, but I think the last park with an outfield dimension longer than 440' was Yankee Stadium before the 1973-4 renovations.  It was 457' to deepest LC before the renovation, and about 463' to center.  Houston was 435' to the hill in CF, but they brought that in to 409 when they ditched the hill because... who knows?  Tiger Stadium was 440' to center.

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Willie Wilson had 13 inside the park homers.  He was really fast, he played in the era of old-school concrete-backed Astroturf, and Royals/Kaufmann Stadium is 387 to RC and has that curve at the pole that sometimes keeps balls rolling along the fenceline.

Wilson had five inside-the-park homers as a rookie in 1979.  That astounding.  Seven of his first nine homers were ISTP.

George Brett had seven ISTPers.

In ancient history ISTP homers were about as common as over-the-fencers.  HOFer Jesse Burkett had 75 homers, 55 ISTP, three bounced.

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