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Mountcastle’s speed

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We’ve mentioned in a few threads how Mountcastle seems much faster than previously billed.    Even Elias has noticed:

“I think the thing that has probably been the most surprising is how well he’s running,” he said. “This is a big young, gangly guy, and last year, he was still coming into his body. And when he showed up in Sarasota this spring, he was noticeably more coordinated and put together. You forget how young this guy is - he was 22 last year. And he had been going through growth spurts and his coordination and overall athleticism really kicked into a higher gear this year.“

https://www.masnsports.com/steve-melewski/2020/09/os-head-to-bronx-for-big-series-and-elias-talks-prospects.html

 

 

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7 minutes ago, InsideCoroner said:

What’s impressed me the most is how quickly he gets out of the batter’s box as a righty. There are left-handed hitters of comparable speed that I think take longer getting to first. 

I'm waiting for OFFNY  to make a specific comparison.

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2 minutes ago, InsideCoroner said:

Yeah, that’s not my specialty unless we’re talking about obscure metal bands from the late ‘80s / early ‘90s. Not a particularly useful area of expertise. 

Narrow window.  I tossed something obscure out there yesterday to see if anyone could get the one obvious and one hidden thing that made it interesting.

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2 hours ago, InsideCoroner said:

Yeah, that’s not my specialty unless we’re talking about obscure metal bands from the late ‘80s / early ‘90s. Not a particularly useful area of expertise. 

You and me both. Loved me some Saigon Kick and Tora Tora!

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5 hours ago, joelala said:

I think we have a future All Star on our hands. Maybe a bit of a #wildcardsmallsamplesize, but he looks like a fixture for years to come. 

I think it’s safe to say he’s going to be a plus bat based on his minor league track record. If he can be average or better defensively we will have a potential perennial all star type. I recall one of the announcers mention his arm the other day. Seems to me if he had enough arm to play SS he ought to be able to manage in LF.

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36 minutes ago, Roll Tide said:

I think it’s safe to say he’s going to be a plus bat based on his minor league track record. If he can be average or better defensively we will have a potential perennial all star type. I recall one of the announcers mention his arm the other day. Seems to me if he had enough arm to play SS he ought to be able to manage in LF.

He didn't have enough arm to play SS.  It was the main reason they moved him off.

It does seem fine for left.

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12 hours ago, Sports Guy said:

Yea they were talking about it last night.

He easily beat out that IF hit. I know the third baseman struggled to get it out of his glove but I think he beats that anyway.  He was way past the bag.

Wasn't his first career hit also an infield single? He came up as a SS so we know he is athletic. 

12 hours ago, InsideCoroner said:

What’s impressed me the most is how quickly he gets out of the batter’s box as a righty. There are left-handed hitters of comparable speed that I think take longer getting to first. 

Like a rich man's Nolan Reimold! 

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1 hour ago, Can_of_corn said:

Mark Reynolds came up as a short stop.

Sort of.  He was drafted as a SS, and played 135 games there in the minors.  But maybe that was because every time he played third he terrified the young and innocent.  Even in A ball he had three years fielding under .900 at third.

And he's never played an inning at short in the majors.  It's hard to be blind and play short.  At least at third you can stick your glove out when you hear the crack of the bat and try to smother it.

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Just now, DrungoHazewood said:

Sort of.  He was drafted as a SS, and played 135 games there in the minors.  But maybe that was because every time he played third he terrified the young and innocent.  Even in A ball he had three years fielding under .900 at third.

And he's never played an inning at short in the majors.  It's hard to be blind and play short.  At least at third you can stick your glove out when you hear the crack of the bat and try to smother it.

I'll be shocked if Mountcastle plays an inning at short.  Unless Buck comes back and trades for him.

I think Mountcastle was considered a SS coming out of HS about as much as Reynolds was.  I don't recall ever reading anything that predicted he would stay at short.

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My rule of thumb is that once a position is mentioned, it is very likely the new home.  Elias was on the broadcast a half-inning sometime after the trade deadline and his Vavra bullet was something like, "he's played shortstop, and he's really good at second base".

He is no longer a SS candidate in my mind in formulations of how the next good team all gets on the field, notwithstanding the 81 SS and 56 2B games in his pro career to date, or being an NCAA All-American SS.

Mountcastle is a perfect fit by the Jamesian trope that a LF is an outfielder who can run but not throw.

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