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Draft Order 2021

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The draft order article on the CBS sports site shows the once mighty O's picking fifth.

It also says that Manfred Mann can change the way the order is done since the teams did not play 81 games. Keep in mind that this is the same butthead that wants to move the mound back two feet because the supposed best baseball players in the world can't handle the velocity the pitchers throwing with.

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4 hours ago, panick said:

The draft order article on the CBS sports site shows the once mighty O's picking fifth.

It also says that Manfred Mann can change the way the order is done since the teams did not play 81 games. Keep in mind that this is the same butthead that wants to move the mound back two feet because the supposed best baseball players in the world can't handle the velocity the pitchers throwing with.

The mound not in the middle of the diamond feels even more blasphemous than seven inning games or a runner on second to start extras. 

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8 minutes ago, BohKnowsBmore said:

The mound not in the middle of the diamond feels even more blasphemous than seven inning games or a runner on second to start extras. 

The mound is 66’ 9” from second base.  

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12 hours ago, BohKnowsBmore said:

The mound not in the middle of the diamond feels even more blasphemous than seven inning games or a runner on second to start extras. 

So you're strongly in favor of moving the mound back three feet?

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12 hours ago, emmett16 said:

The mound is 66’ 9” from second base.  

 

6 minutes ago, DrungoHazewood said:

So you're strongly in favor of moving the mound back three feet?

Well don't I look and feel quite dumb...

My larger point was that changing the core dimensions of the field as they have existed for quite some time (Drungo can probably give the specifics) feels even more foundational of a change to me than the other two more "special case" adjustments they have made, which I don't particularly care for.

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16 minutes ago, BohKnowsBmore said:

 

Well don't I look and feel quite dumb...

My larger point was that changing the core dimensions of the field as they have existed for quite some time (Drungo can probably give the specifics) feels even more foundational of a change to me than the other two more "special case" adjustments they have made, which I don't particularly care for.

They moved the pitching distance and configuration often in the 1870s through 1893.  The current distance and the existence of the mound dates from 1893.

But it has also been about a century since we had anything like the increases in strikeouts we've seen in my fandom.  In 1981 there were less than 5 K/9, the last couple of years have approached nine.  When I first started getting into analytics there was a rule of thumb that a pitcher can't be successful for long at less than, say, four strikeouts per nine.  Since the start of 2019 no pitcher (good or bad) has thrown 30 innings with less than 4.15 K/9.

I think it's already a fundamental change that strikeouts (and homers) have nearly doubled since I started watching baseball.  So MLB can choose, do the foundational changes happen on their terms, or do they just happen?

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3 hours ago, DrungoHazewood said:

They moved the pitching distance and configuration often in the 1870s through 1893.  The current distance and the existence of the mound dates from 1893.

But it has also been about a century since we had anything like the increases in strikeouts we've seen in my fandom.  In 1981 there were less than 5 K/9, the last couple of years have approached nine.  When I first started getting into analytics there was a rule of thumb that a pitcher can't be successful for long at less than, say, four strikeouts per nine.  Since the start of 2019 no pitcher (good or bad) has thrown 30 innings with less than 4.15 K/9.

I think it's already a fundamental change that strikeouts (and homers) have nearly doubled since I started watching baseball.  So MLB can choose, do the foundational changes happen on their terms, or do they just happen?

I think there's a clear difference between natural evolution of the game (adjusting strategies, corresponding responses, etc.) vs. the league putting its thumb on the scale to effectuate a change.

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49 minutes ago, BohKnowsBmore said:

I think there's a clear difference between natural evolution of the game (adjusting strategies, corresponding responses, etc.) vs. the league putting its thumb on the scale to effectuate a change.

Yes. With the league putting it's thumb on the scale you have some control over where the game goes.  When you allow evolution to take its course you end up with the Reds hitting .212 with 1.5 homers a game and a strikeout every four PAs.  Evolution is guided by what's going to win this team the most games right now, even if we end up with something that isn't particularly entertaining.

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10 hours ago, DrungoHazewood said:

They moved the pitching distance and configuration often in the 1870s through 1893.  The current distance and the existence of the mound dates from 1893.

But it has also been about a century since we had anything like the increases in strikeouts we've seen in my fandom.  In 1981 there were less than 5 K/9, the last couple of years have approached nine.  When I first started getting into analytics there was a rule of thumb that a pitcher can't be successful for long at less than, say, four strikeouts per nine.  Since the start of 2019 no pitcher (good or bad) has thrown 30 innings with less than 4.15 K/9.

I think it's already a fundamental change that strikeouts (and homers) have nearly doubled since I started watching baseball.  So MLB can choose, do the foundational changes happen on their terms, or do they just happen?

The great increases in homers and strikeouts have occurred in the last few years. I think it may be because the players are practicing putting backspin on the balls when they hit them. The backspin will make the balls travel farther, but it's also harder to put backspin on a baseball by hitting it. If you watch Sports Center when they are showing highlights of homeruns, they usually show in slow motion some of the batters' swings. If you see this from the camera angle that is near the dugout facing the batter, you can see that the batters are swinging using a downward angle. The downward angle will put backspin on the ball(if it is hit just right). It's also harder to hit the ball when your swing has that angle. So if the batters hit the pitches just right, the balls will have backspin and if those balls are in the air they will have more of a chance of going over the fence. But it is also harder to make contact with the pitch, which makes an increase in strikeouts inevitable. 

Analytics have made the old idea of the level swing just something in the memories of us old-timers.

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9 hours ago, panick said:

Analytics have made the old idea of the level swing just something in the memories of us old-timers.

I forget who it was, maybe Donaldson but he was talking about the traditional advice behind a level swing.  About how you should be trying to hit the ball up the middle.  The hitter in question was why would I want a swing that is designed to hit a single up the middle?

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5 minutes ago, sportsfan8703 said:

Any chance in the new CBA that they will allow draft picks to be traded?  I feel like Elias would definitely be a mover and a shaker. 

I don't see why draft picks being tradeable would be something that would be relevant to the labor negotiation.  What does that have to do with the Player's union?

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1 minute ago, Can_of_corn said:

I don't see why draft picks being tradeable would be something that would be relevant to the labor negotiation.  What does that have to do with the Player's union?

It would still have to be collectively bargained and part of the CBA as a whole.

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1 minute ago, Sports Guy said:

It would still have to be collectively bargained and part of the CBA as a whole.

Serious question, why?

It has nothing to do with the Player's union.  That is the sort of change that MLB should be able to unilaterally make.

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