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Moose Milligan

Tony La Russa...?

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12 hours ago, SteveA said:

Kids who watched the Simpsons when it was at its peak of popularity have kids of their own now.

When I went to my 25th HS reunion, which was age 43, I was amazed at how the women still mostly looked young and almost exactly the same as they did in high school, with just a few exceptions.  The men, myself included, had all put on weight and looked a lot different.   I was much more likely to need a name tag to let me know who a guy was than a girl.

Not much change at all by the 30th (48 years old).

At the 35th (53) the women started really showing their age and suddenly I needed name tags for the women too.  And for the first time, in both sexes, I saw people who "looked like grandparents" to me.   Not the majority, but certainly a decent number.  (And of course some of them actually ARE grandparents).

Recently something on social media made me look up a woman who I'd been in some classes with at Tech.  She'd been either in the running for or won homecoming queen in '89 or '90.  I remembered her name because most of my engineering classes had 2-3 women among the 30, 50, 100 students and most of them definitely weren't the homecoming queen.

Shouldn't have done that.  The first picture I found was her in a plain dress, some gray in her hair, and clutching a handbag, with her grown kids.  Very grandmotherly. It's shocking to see someone looking 55 or 60 when the picture in your mind is of an attractive 19-year-old.

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@DrungoHazewood you can add Earl and Sparky Anderson to baseball managers that looked a lot older than they really were.

50 today isn't the same as 50 30-40+ years ago.  I'm not sure why that is.  Maybe we know how to take better care of ourselves and there's more of an emphasis on fitness and nutrition than there was back then.  It didn't take long, but people in their 50s these days definitely don't look the way people in their 50s did a generation or two ago.

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1 hour ago, Moose Milligan said:

@DrungoHazewood you can add Earl and Sparky Anderson to baseball managers that looked a lot older than they really were.

50 today isn't the same as 50 30-40+ years ago.  I'm not sure why that is.  Maybe we know how to take better care of ourselves and there's more of an emphasis on fitness and nutrition than there was back then.  It didn't take long, but people in their 50s these days definitely don't look the way people in their 50s did a generation or two ago.

Agreed.  Probably a number of reasons, including what you said about nutrition and fitness.  Up until the 1970s the average 30, 40, 50-year-old did zero cardio, weights, etc.  Somewhere in the 70s and 80s jogging and some other types of popular exercise became things.  Nutrition is an impact comparing to 100 years ago.  Look at photos of ballplayers from the 30s and many of them have this thin, sunken cheek appearance that nobody today has.

I think smoking is a huge part of it.  In the 60s and 70s and before something close to 50% of the population smoked.  That just crushes how you look as you age.  I've known people who looked good at 30 but went downhill fast because of a combination of smoking and tanning.  Earl and Cal Sr. smoked like chimneys, and were out in the sun all summer.

Also, I think women are much more likely today to have non-grandma hairstyles and coloring to mask gray hair.

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Here's an example, Ken Williams, the Browns outfielder from the 1920s.  In this picture he's 32 years old.  If you saw someone like that today you'd assume he's 50, and maybe not in great health.
Ken-williams.jpg

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4 hours ago, Moose Milligan said:

@DrungoHazewood you can add Earl and Sparky Anderson to baseball managers that looked a lot older than they really were.

50 today isn't the same as 50 30-40+ years ago.  I'm not sure why that is.  Maybe we know how to take better care of ourselves and there's more of an emphasis on fitness and nutrition than there was back then.  It didn't take long, but people in their 50s these days definitely don't look the way people in their 50s did a generation or two ago.

Way less cigarette smoking today.   I think in addition to other things, it makes the skin more "leathery" and less smooth.

Don't know if it's based that much onfitness and nutrition.   I'm 56.   I'm fat and out of shape.   And I look -- fat and out of shape.   But I don't think I look "56".   No gray hair or wrinkles.   I think I look like a fat out of shape guy in his 40s.   Or maybe early 50s, as the little hair thinning area on the top of my head makes its presence more and more known.   But I still think I look younger than Sparky or Earl did when they were in their mid to late 40s.

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2 minutes ago, SteveA said:

Way less cigarette smoking today.   I think in addition to other things, it makes the skin more "leathery" and less smooth.

 

Also way less exposure to sunlight for most folks.

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19 hours ago, Can_of_corn said:

Also way less exposure to sunlight for most folks.

Tanning is the equivalent of trading Josh Hader for Bud Norris.  Works okay in the moment, then you kind of regret it for the next 50 years.

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https://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/30288007/chicago-white-sox-manager-tony-la-russa-charged-dui-stemming-february-arrest-court-docs-show

 

Quote

Chicago White Sox manager Tony La Russa was charged with driving under the influence after he allegedly ran his car into a curb in February, leaving it smoking on the side of a Phoenix-area road, according to court records obtained by ESPN.

It is the second known drunken driving arrest for La Russa, who in 2007 pleaded guilty to misdemeanor DUI in Jupiter, Florida.

A 76-year-old Hall of Famer long regarded as one of the canniest managers in baseball, La Russa's hiring to lead the White Sox last week after a nine-year absence from the dugout shocked observers throughout the game.

When reached by ESPN on Monday night, La Russa said, "I have nothing to say," and hung up the phone.

A White Sox spokesman said the organization was aware of the incident.

"Because this is an active case," he said, "we cannot comment further at this time."

On Feb. 24 at 11:40 p.m., a peace officer responded to a call and found La Russa standing alongside his SUV, according to an affidavit filed by the Arizona Department of Public Safety. La Russa told the officer, who had detected a "light odor of alcoholic beverage," that he had been at a dinner with friends from the Los Angeles Angels, for whom he was working as a special advisor. He was stopped near the Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, and he told the officer he had hit something and had a tire blow out, according to the affidavit. After a field sobriety test, La Russa was taken into custody. In the affidavit, the peace officer described him as "argumentative."

 

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Second DUI and the White Sox knew about it before they hired him.

How does that make sense? 

How many times does a celebrity have to drive drunk do get hit with two DUIs?

 

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