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Snyder: better hitter than Reimold?

Will Snyder be a better major league hitter than Reimold?  

97 members have voted

  1. 1. Will Snyder be a better major league hitter than Reimold?

    • Yes - his line drive gap hitting will make him the better hitter
    • No - Reimold's power and patience make him the better hitter


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I have not seen Snyder play, so I can't really judge this one. The big difference between Scott and Reimold is Reimold's ability to get basehits on pure speed. I can recall a coupl of multi-hit games last year when he was slumping and never squared up on a ball. It is for this reason why I fear the move to 1B for Reimold. I just don't want him to bulk up and lose the quickness that sets him apart.

For those who have seen Snyder play, how does speed or lack thereof play a role in his offensive production (beyond obvious steals or triples numbers)?

For the record, I haven't seen Snyder either - well once, so I'm totally going off of the opinions I've read over the last few years.

On Reimold, you're right, his speed helps him. This probably goes without saying, but what also helps him is the fact that he tries...like a lot more than most guys. People with speed who bust their butt up the line force bad throws and he did that several times last year.

Reimold's exactly the type of guy I want on this team moving forward. He has skill, tools and heart. He's a great example for everyone else on this team, and he provides that emotional factor that BRob, Markakis and Wieters may not.

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Reimold had 0.0 problems hitting AAA and MLB pitching. Snyder did, at least in AAA.

I'll also take Reimold's patience. The guy looks like a seasoned veteran at the plate. For Snyder to surpass that, it would mean he'd be one of the best young hitters in the game.

That said I have never seen Snyder play or looked at his advanced stats.

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I thought Snyder was a better hitter last offseason and continue to believe that - but it's not a big difference between them IMO. Snyder showed significantly better strike zone judgement last year v 2008 and I expect he will continue to close that BB rate gap with Reimold as BS adjusts and matures as a hitter. I expect Snyder to close the HR gap as well.

IMO, the big difference in perception regarding their hitting abilities is from the positions they play. If both hit for an ops near 850, the LFer will be considered better relative to the league average for that position.

I think both could settle down into an ops range of 825 to 875 as major leaguers.

That would be pretty outstanding -- I think this year .825 was Top 30 in the AL amongst all hitters and .875 was around Top 15 in the AL.

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Reimold had 0.0 problems hitting AAA and MLB pitching. Snyder did, at least in AAA.

Completely irrevelant. Snyder was 22 and Riemold was 25. Give Snyder 3 years and lets see what he does at Norfolk. This is really close but i just love Snyders swing.

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It depends on what's meant by "hitter."

If you're talking strictly hit tool/batting average, Snyder has the clear edge. He has much better bat control, better contact rates, and lower K numbers.

Snyder will likely be the better hitter for average in the big leagues.

While Snyder makes consistent contact, Reimold is clearly a more disciplined hitter. He will walk more, draw more pitches, and swing at fewer pitches out of the strike zone.

Reimold has the edge in raw power, however he will need to make contact at a solid rate in order to manifest it. When he gets streaky with his contact he will easily hit bombs to all parts of the field in bunches, as we saw when he was first brought up. When he is not making regular contact we will see a relative power outage like we saw later in the year.

Snyder has good gap power and should rack up the doubles. His contact rates and slightly above average raw power should lead to 20-25 HR.

I see them both settling into ~.850 OPS guys. Snyder will have a higher average with lower ISOs, but their OBP/SLG should equalize. Snyder may face year-to-year fluctuation because his OPS will be heavily dependent on batting average (which will fluctuate due to BABIP). Reimold may face year-to-year fluctuation because of his streakiness and somewhat limited contact rates.

In summary:

Batting average - Snyder

Offensive production - Tie

Overall value - Reimold has a slight edge if he can stick in left defensively. Neither are defensive wizards and either or both could end up as a DH. They are similarly valuable as prospects IMO.

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It depends on what's meant by "hitter."

If you're talking strictly hit tool/batting average, Snyder has the clear edge. He has much better bat control, better contact rates, and lower K numbers.

Snyder will likely be the better hitter for average in the big leagues.

While Snyder makes consistent contact, Reimold is clearly a more disciplined hitter. He will walk more, draw more pitches, and swing at fewer pitches out of the strike zone.

Reimold has the edge in raw power, however he will need to make contact at a solid rate in order to manifest it. When he gets streaky with his contact he will easily hit bombs to all parts of the field in bunches, as we saw when he was first brought up. When he is not making regular contact we will see a relative power outage like we saw later in the year.

Snyder has good gap power and should rack up the doubles. His contact rates and slightly above average raw power should lead to 20-25 HR.

I see them both settling into ~.850 OPS guys. Snyder will have a higher average with lower ISOs, but their OBP/SLG should equalize. Snyder may face year-to-year fluctuation because his OPS will be heavily dependent on batting average (which will fluctuate due to BABIP). Reimold may face year-to-year fluctuation because of his streakiness and somewhat limited contact rates.

In summary:

Batting average - Snyder

Offensive production - Tie

Overall value - Reimold has a slight edge if he can stick in left defensively. Neither are defensive wizards and either or both could end up as a DH. They are similarly valuable as prospects IMO.

I agree w/ this. And I'm glad to have both. If we get above average production from CF, RF and C, those numbers at 1B and 3B will look pretty good for the cheap contracts.

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I went with Reimold, but it was a hard decision for me.

The premise of this thread is interesting. It's sort of trying to make the point that we're under rating Snyder. Unfortunately, I personally believe that many here still under rate Reimold.

I think fewer people underrate Reimold now, as compared to a year ago. There were a lot of scouts and others questioning whether Reimold's flaws were too big for him to be a solid major league player. To me, Reimold answered those questions last year, and we can all see that while he does have some flaws, he also has some great strengths and tools that will allow him to be a solid major leaguer and maybe more.

I think Snyder now is in the position Reimold was in a year ago. And I think he'll answer his critics, just as Reimold did.

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Snyder will likely be a better contact guy but Reimold should have more patience, more power and likely a higher OPS.

So, I guess it depends on what you mean by "better hitter". A guy who hits better or the better all around offensive player?

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I think fewer people underrate Reimold now, as compared to a year ago. There were a lot of scouts and others questioning whether Reimold's flaws were too big for him to be a solid major league player. To me, Reimold answered those questions last year, and we can all see that while he does have some flaws, he also has some great strengths and tools that will allow him to be a solid major leaguer and maybe more.

I think Snyder now is in the position Reimold was in a year ago. And I think he'll answer his critics, just as Reimold did.

I feel like Reimold still has a wide spectrum of what he could become. The plate discipline, power and hot streaks make me think that he could be a perennial All Star. The streakiness makes me think he could be an average player. The injuries coupled with streakiness make me think he'll be gone in 3-4 years.

If he's healthy, I predict that he'll be somewhere in between the top two categories. He'll likely never reach that amazing ceiling (sort of Giambi-esque in his prime), but certainly better than Scott pretty much every year.

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I am not sure if many people realize that Snyder had a better BB rate in Bowie in 233 at-bats, 11.6%, than Reimold had in 789 - 10.1%. Snyder played at Bowie at age 22, while Reimold played at 23 and 24. Reimold's K/BB rate overall at Bowie was 1.6 while Snyder's was 1.7.

Reimold's numbers in Bowie at age 24 showed tremendous improvement in the BB and K rate from his age 23 and was better at 24 in Bowie than Snyder.

At AAA, Reimold's age 25 BB rate was 13.8% while Snyder's age 22 rate was 8.1%.

I think people either fail to notice Snyder's improvements in BB rates or overstate the difference between Reimold's plate discipline and Snyder's.

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Also wanted to point out that Snyder at Norfolk at age 22 had an 8.1% BB rate and a 2.67 K/AB rate in 233 PAs compared to Reimold's 8.4% BB rate and 2.76 K/BB rate at Bowie at age 23 in 203 PAs.

I'm not saying Snyder has better plate discipline, but I think concluding that Reimold has much better discipline is premature.

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I've seen Reimold in the minors and (on TV) in the majors and got to see Snyder in Bowie, and neither one got a base hit that I witnessed in person. But both of them absolutely <i>smoked</i> line drives in my presence, the sort of screaming LDs that take the heads off unwary, Chardonnay-sipping non-fans. The difference, as I recall, is that Snyder was much more aggressive without chasing a ton of bad pitches and hit everything really hard, whereas Reimold seemed a lot more selective and was happy enough to take a walk.

I give the edge to Snyder because of his age and his body (and despite the fact that he wouldn't give my kid an autograph just seconds after he gave one to my nephew:(). The kid can add 20 pounds of muscle to that frame and the Brob level of doubles he's capable of can then start to translate into dingers. I don't see him ever launching moon shots or hitting the wall at Camden Yards, but people sitting by the foul poles better be paying attention when he's at the plate, because he could become the king of the frozen rope (which I think is my favorite baseball expression).

Edited by peter snees
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Reimold's numbers in Bowie at age 24 showed tremendous improvement in the BB and K rate from his age 23 and was better at 24 in Bowie than Snyder.

I think the point is that leaps like this are rare. It would be silly to expect Snyder to make the same kind of progression. No one is ruling it out, but most of us go with what we see, and project a reasonable progression.

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I feel like Reimold still has a wide spectrum of what he could become. The plate discipline, power and hot streaks make me think that he could be a perennial All Star. The streakiness makes me think he could be an average player. The injuries coupled with streakiness make me think he'll be gone in 3-4 years.

If he's healthy, I predict that he'll be somewhere in between the top two categories. He'll likely never reach that amazing ceiling (sort of Giambi-esque in his prime), but certainly better than Scott pretty much every year.

One thing I liked last year: even when Reimold slumped, his approach at the plate didn't change much. He rarely chases bad pitches, no matter what.

I think Reimold's downside is probably a .775 type player, his upside is an .880 - .900 type player. He certainly doesn't lack for effort and hustle. He brought more to the table than I had expected, frankly. If he's healthy, I think he'll be a very solid player at least into his early 30's, as Scott is now. And while Reimold may be streaky, nobody's as streaky as Scott.

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I've seen Reimold in the minors and (on TV) in the majors and got to see Snyder in Bowie, and neither one got a base hit that I witnessed in person. But both of them absolutely <i>smoked</i> line drives in my presence, the sort of screaming LDs that take the heads off unwary, Chardonnay-sipping non-fans. The difference, as I recall, is that Snyder was much more aggressive without chasing a ton of bad pitches and hit everything really hard, whereas Reimold seemed a lot more selective and was happy enough to take a walk.

I give the edge to Snyder because of his age and his body (and despite the fact that he wouldn't give my kid an autograph just seconds after he gave one to my nephew:(). The kid can add 20 pounds of muscle to that frame and the Brob level of doubles he's capable of can then start to translate into dingers. I don't see him ever launching moon shots or hitting the wall at Camden Yards, but people sitting by the foul poles better be paying attention when he's at the plate, because he could become the king of the frozen rope (which I think is my favorite baseball expression).

This is a great post for many reasons, but the bolded portion suggests that Baltimore might be the wrong town for Snyder. :laughlol:

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