Jump to content
NewOrioleWork

The Official Transit and Urban Development Thread

Recommended Posts

Seriously, we're spamming the board with all these posts and annoying all the suburbanites. From now on any news or insights or analysis involving urban/suburban development or public transportation should be placed here. I've got some good links I'll be posting here soon.

Later,

Alexander

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Urban development links:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/

--Excellent forums for discussion, pictures, etc. of urban development for cities all over the world. The Baltimore/Washington section is nice and active. Special sections for skyscrapers, of course.

http://www.uli.org

--The Urban Land Institute. Think-tank based out of DC dedicated to analysis of urban, suburban and infrastructure trends, primarily in America but also throughout the whole world. I particularly recommend their policy papers here:

http://www.uli.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Policy_Papers1&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=100&ContentID=11038

The "Ifrastructure 2007: A Global Perspective" paper is excellent for developing an understanding of the primary issues and challenges facing American infrastructure development. A must for anyone interested in the development of our cities and suburbs.

http://www.smartgrowth.umd.edu/

-- The National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education

Think tank based out of U of MD; has worked with ULI in the past and been featured in local media. Their work appears to be a tad more focused and academic then others, but there is a plethora of information available in the, "research" section of their site.

http://www.cphabaltimore.org/

Citizens Planning and Housing Association. Active advocacy group in Bmore that focuses on urban develop, transit oriented development, etc. Based on Saratoga Street. Been mentioned in the news a couple of times lately.

http://www.cnu.org/

Congress for New Urbanism. Urban advocacy group. I know they're active and about, not sure how much though.

http://weburbanist.com/

Blog dedicated to urban art, architecture, and environments. Some cool, trippy stuff there.

Transit links:

http://getontrac.org/

--TRAC = Transit Riders Action Council, the lead advocate group in Maryland for public transportation. I've met a few of the people in charge there and can vouch for their intelligence and dedication. They've been mentioned in The Sun a plethora of times and have developed a working relationship with the MTA. They're worth one's time and money.

http://onelesscar.org/

--Can't say much about these guys, other then that they're an official non-profit organization that loves biking and walking. They also seem to be politically involved too, though less in the spotlight then TRAC apparently.

http://www.btco.net/

--Nice site to see photos from the old Baltimore Transit Co. Absolutely beautiful if you're into that kind of thing.

Peak Oil and energy links:

http://www.peakoil.com/forums.html

The best Peak Oil forums I've run across so far. Lots of informed discussion by people from all over the globe, in and out of the oil industry. Years of archives to dig through with a steady stream of contemporary traffic. News on the front page, too.

http://www.cera.com/aspx/cda/public1/home/home.aspx

Cambridge Energy Research Associates. The primary anti-Peak Oil research center. Rather upbeat about the future of energy. Good place to begin research on an anti-Peak Oil argument.

http://www.theoildrum.com/

One of the best Peak Oil blog and news sites. Lots of news and detailed analysis, updated regularly.

http://www.energybulletin.net/

Lots and lots of energy related news.

http://www.eia.doe.gov/oil_gas/petroleum/data_publications/wrgp/mogas_home_page.html

Weekly updated list (comparisons of regions and differing times provided) of US gasoline prices.

http://www.bloomberg.com/energy/

Daily list of various petrol, gas, and electricity prices. How long until we reach that $100/bbl mark...?

http://thearchdruidreport.blogspot.com/

"Druid perspectives on nature, culture, and the future of industrial society." His writings concern the nature of modern society, what Peak Oil is likely to do to us, and what life will look like in the short, medium, long, and very long term post PO. Probably one of the most intelligent writers online; disagree with his basic premises (PO) or not, he's interesting as hell to read.

http://kunstler.com/index.html

James Kunstler, speaker and author of, "The Long Emergency." Gloom and doomer, but not stupid. I disagree with a fair portion of what he says.

If anyone has any links/info to recommend, I can update this list. I think its handy to have one list accessible to anyone interested in developing knowledge on this kind of thing, especially since we talk about it so much here.

--Alexander

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/bay_environment/bal-climate0920,0,1139786.story?coll=bal_tab01_layout

Suburban sprawl is the missing link in climate change, a group of urban planning researchers said today, warning in a new report that global warming can only be slowed by changing development patterns to reduce the need for driving.

Shocking, isn't it?!

Seriously though it's great to see good planning academics like Reid Ewing getting publicity in the mainstream press for their work over the last few years (he was also involved in the landmark study on sprawl and obesity). The more I see stuff like this reaching the public and the more I toil away writing New Jersey affordable housing plans and the like, the more I think I might need to get a PhD sometime in the not too distant future... :cool:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In other news, the sky is blue :P

Seriously though, any registered voter who read that and said, "HOLY S#(%, I didn't know THAT," is not someone I want voting to determine those who will determine our future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/bay_environment/bal-climate0920,0,1139786.story?coll=bal_tab01_layout

Shocking, isn't it?!

Seriously though it's great to see good planning academics like Reid Ewing getting publicity in the mainstream press for their work over the last few years (he was also involved in the landmark study on sprawl and obesity). The more I see stuff like this reaching the public and the more I toil away writing New Jersey affordable housing plans and the like, the more I think I might need to get a PhD sometime in the not too distant future... :cool:

Nice article, but no mention of transit. Can't have compact, transit-oriented development...without transit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nice article, but no mention of transit. Can't have compact, transit-oriented development...without transit.

Sure...just build a LOT of parking garages and twenty-lane roads ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In other news, the sky is blue :P

Seriously though, any registered voter who read that and said, "HOLY S#(%, I didn't know THAT," is not someone I want voting to determine those who will determine our future.

It does seem self-evident, but the link between environmental pollution, sprawl, AND PUBLIC TRANSIT isn't second-nature to, in my opinion, a majority of Americans.

First, you raise the consciousness, and then hopefully people begin to think about this at the ballot box.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/bay_environment/bal-climate0920,0,1139786.story?coll=bal_tab01_layout

Shocking, isn't it?!

Seriously though it's great to see good planning academics like Reid Ewing getting publicity in the mainstream press for their work over the last few years (he was also involved in the landmark study on sprawl and obesity). The more I see stuff like this reaching the public and the more I toil away writing New Jersey affordable housing plans and the like, the more I think I might need to get a PhD sometime in the not too distant future... :cool:

Thanks for the article.

Heh, the survey was commissioned by the ULI. Small world and all that.

Something that really surprised me from the article,

Baltimore ranked as only the 64th most sprawling metropolitan area out of 83 analyzed by Ewing several years ago -- compared with Washington's score as the 26th most sprawling. But the Baltimore area has some of the nation's longest commutes, and the time commuters spend stuck in traffic has quadrupled since 1982, according to a separate report issued this week by the Texas Transportation Institute.

The future holds more of the same, the report's authors predict. The U.S. Energy Information Administration projects total miles driven to increase by 59 percent by 2030, which they say would cancel out whatever reductions in carbon dioxide might be achieved by improving the gas mileage of cars and trucks.

Building homes and businesses closer together, with more opportunities to walk to work and to shop, could reduce driving by 20 to 40 percent, the report argues. Residents in compact urban neighborhoods with access to public transportation typically drive a third fewer miles than do auto-dependent suburbanites, it points out.

The potential for reducing driving, and carbon dioxide emissions, is great, the report's authors contend. They point to an estimate that two-thirds of the homes and other buildings expected to be needed by 2050 have yet to be built.

Wow. That is nuts. All the building and growing we've done over the last decade plus, and there's a good chance that its nothing compared to what we'll need in a few decades. Amazing; really helps put into perspective our infrastructure issues for the next generation.

--Alexander

Hoping American cities can take advantage of this window of opportunity...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Urban development links:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/

--Excellent forums for discussion, pictures, etc. of urban development for cities all over the world. The Baltimore/Washington section is nice and active. Special sections for skyscrapers, of course.

I'm a bit of a lurker here, and find the forum great. Pretty much the opposite of the Baltimore Sun local news forum. It's nice to read about some positive stuff relating to Baltimore City once in awhile. There is still a lot of B-More pride out there....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm a bit of a lurker here, and find the forum great. Pretty much the opposite of the Baltimore Sun local news forum. It's nice to read about some positive stuff relating to Baltimore City once in awhile. There is still a lot of B-More pride out there....

Yeah, I love skyscrapercity's Baltimore board, lurk there all the time. There are a few people there who can be almost too pro-development (let's build everything super tall and completely out of proportion and burn down all the rowhouses, yay! :rolleyes:), but most of the posters there are smart, well-informed, and well-intentioned, and they love Baltimore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"We used to not talk, and it wasn't just me," said Roberts, who lives next door to Markakis and sometimes carpools with him to Camden Yards.

http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/baseball/bal-sp.markakis22sep22,0,2858574.story?page=1&coll=bal_tab01_layout

Not as sustainable as Jeremy Guthrie and his bike obviously but still it brings a little joy to this planners heart that they at least sometimes leave one of their ginormous SUVs at home. :)

Is anybody else a big enough planning/baseball geek to think it would be cool to calculate a sustainability index on each team? You'd look at things like:

The team & stadium:

  • energy efficiency of the stadium
  • public transit accessibility
  • walkability around it
  • connectivity to the city
  • green landscaping and other practices
  • healthy food options

The players:

  • Whether they live in the city or exurban McMansions
  • How big/inefficient their homes are
  • how they commute to the ballpark
  • what types of cars they drive

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/baseball/bal-sp.markakis22sep22,0,2858574.story?page=1&coll=bal_tab01_layout

Not as sustainable as Jeremy Guthrie and his bike obviously but still it brings a little joy to this planners heart that they at least sometimes leave one of their ginormous SUVs at home. :)

Is anybody else a big enough planning/baseball geek to think it would be cool to calculate a sustainability index on each team? You'd look at things like:

The team & stadium:

  • energy efficiency of the stadium
  • public transit accessibility
  • walkability around it
  • connectivity to the city
  • green landscaping and other practices
  • healthy food options

The players:

  • Whether they live in the city or exurban McMansions
  • How big/inefficient their homes are
  • how they commute to the ballpark
  • what types of cars they drive

I'm guessing that you, me, TGO and NewOrioleWork, at most, would fit that bill. :)

It pains me to say it, but I bet the Yankees would win that category.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No two ways about it, MD drives too much. With BRAC being introduced to an already growing population, and public transportation and efficient urban/suburban development completely off the public radar, it looks like suburban sprawl and traffic congestion will only get worse in this state.

http://www.nbc4.com/traffic/14141724/detail.html?dl=headlineclick

D.C.-Area Traffic Ranked 2nd-Worst In Nation

Los Angeles Ranked No. 1

POSTED: 1:09 pm EDT September 18, 2007

UPDATED: 10:45 am EDT September 19, 2007

WASHINGTON -- The Washington metro area has the second worst gridlock in the U.S., according to a new report from the Texas Transportation Institute.

The group's Urban Mobility Report, which was released Tuesday, shows that only Los Angeles has worse traffic. The report ranked D.C. tied for second with the San Francisco-Oakland region and Atlanta.

The report showed that trips are taking longer than ever and that drivers in the D.C. area spend an average of more than 60 hours a year sitting in gridlock.

Not only is traffic annoying, it's also expensive, the report noted. It showed that traffic is costing each person who travels during rush-hour in the D.C. area, $1,094.

"Once again we are reminded that gridlock we are stuck in the D.C. area during each rush hour is not normal. It's some of the very worst in the nation, and it's horribly expensive," said Mahlon G. "Lon" Anderson, AAA Mid-Atlantic's Director of Public And Government Affairs. "It costs us precious time, and expensive fuel, not to mention the toll it takes on our lives each day.”

The report also ranked D.C. fifth in wasted fuel by travelers at 43 wasted gallons per traveler, per year.

Also, taken from a previous post of mine a week or so ago...

www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/bal-te.md.census12sep12,0,3210232.story

State's suburbs nurture diversity

Region saw 38% rise in immigrants in 6 years, census figures show

By Kelly Brewington

Sun reporter

September 12, 2007

Marylanders are increasingly diverse and better educated and endure commutes more grueling than those in nearly any other state in the nation, according to figures released today by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Immigrants are fueling population growth even in places not previously known for having ethnic enclaves. While the Washington suburbs have long been a magnet for thriving immigrant communities, the Baltimore region was home to about 200,000 foreign-born residents in 2006, an increase of nearly 38 percent since 2000.

"It's partially a spillover from the Washington metro area,"

...

Getting to those high-paying jobs means slogging through Baltimore Beltway traffic or spending more time on public transportation.

Maryland had the second-longest mean commuting time in the nation at 30.6 minutes. Only New York, with 30.9 minutes, was higher, although experts note the differences are not statistically significant.

Washington suburban commuters coped with the longest trips to work, with Charles County residents clocking in at 40 minutes.

In the Baltimore region, Carroll County commuters had the longest journeys - 35.4 minutes - and Anne Arundel County had the shortest with 28.2 minutes, six second less than Baltimore City.

Nearly half of all people who live in Carroll County commute to jobs outside the jurisdiction, and those who do inevitably hit traffic traveling along Interstate 795, said Harvey S. Bloom, director of transportation planning at the Baltimore Metropolitan Council.

"You're not going to build your way out of it," Bloom said. "Building road capacity is not going to fix it. You need to try to get people to live closer to where they work, develop new transit connections; it's a full gamut."

Others have strongly encouraged public transportation as an alternative to clogged roads.

The Live Baltimore Home Center launched a campaign earlier this year to lure Washington residents to Baltimore, selling the MARC commuter rail line as a viable option for long commutes. Last month, it sponsored a happy hour at a Washington bar, calling the event "Keys to Buying in Charm City."

Live Baltimore has also been promoting the city to military employees in Virginia who will be affected by the military base realignment ordered by Congress.

"It's all about getting one less car on the highway," said Anna Custer, Live Baltimore's executive director, "and offering more options that are mass transit-oriented."

[email protected]

With a budget deficit to overcome, and the expensive ICC and Bay Bridge repair at the top of the transportation/infrastructure money queue, MD doesn't appear to have much flexibility over the next few years to address what it needs to before tens of thousands of new households are added by BRAC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...and public transportation and efficient urban/suburban development completely off the public radar...

That's why we're here!

Did you get my e-mail yesterday? It speaks to much the same thing that you just posted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm guessing that you, me, TGO and NewOrioleWork, at most, would fit that bill. :)

It pains me to say it, but I bet the Yankees would win that category.

Well who else even reads this thread? ;)

As for the sustainability index, a lot would depend on the size and sprawliness of the city... the Mets and Red Sox would have a chance but maybe noone else. You'd definitely be looking at a team in a big enough city that there's a critical mass of rich people living in the city, it's inconvenient to live far out, and taking the subway is easier than driving due to traffic volumes, lack of parking, and efficiency of the transit system. Maybe could handicap it so that players who live near transit but don't take it lose more points than players who live in an urban area that should have transit but the city doesn't provide it, or we could compare the players' lifestyle part to the average resident of their metro area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


Orioles Information


Orioles News and Information

Daily Organizational Boxscores
News

Tony's Takes

Orioles Roster Resource

Orioles Prospect Information

2018 End of Season Top 30 Prospects List

Prospect Scouting Reports

Statistics

2019 Orioles Stats

2019 Orioles Minor League Stats

Baseball Savant Stats






×
×
  • Create New...