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Worst trade ever


RShack

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That really happened?!?! How early in Nolan's career was that?

After the 1971 season. Yep, it really happened. Fregosi was a big star at the time but bombed in NY. Not only that, but the Mets threw in a bunch of other players in on that trade.

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That really happened?!?! How early in Nolan's career was that?

He was a kid who hadn't done much yet... they sent him and 3 other guys to get Fregosi... Fregosi was 28 and a 6-time All Star (back when that meant something), it didn't seem crazy at the time... too bad for the Mets that Fregosi never did much after that... meanwhile, Ryan got it together immediately after the trade. Who knew?

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A couple years ago, The Hardball Times published a list of The Best and Worst Teams of the Trade for the period 1961 through 2002. The rankings are based upon total WSAB (Win Shares Above Baseline) of the players received in trades, compared to the total WSAB of the players traded away.

1. Royals

2. White Sox

3. Padres

4. Rangers

5. Yankees

6. Orioles

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13. Cardinals

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28. Red Sox

29. Braves

30. Mets

There are any number of compilations of the Worst/Best trades in baseball history. Here are a couple:

From a Fox Sports News article.

1. Christy Mathewson for Amos Rusie, December 15, 1900

In 1900, the Cincinnati Reds thought they were getting a terrific pitcher in Rusie, who had won 241 games for New York before the turn of the century. Mathewson went on to win 373 games, all but one for the New York Giants. Rusie, elected to the Hall of Fame in 1977, never won a game for the Reds. The good news is that there was no sports talk radio, and no one got fired for pulling the trigger on this one-sided trade.

2. Lou Brock for Ernie Broglio and Bobby Shantz, June 15, 1964

One could actually see what the Cubs were thinking. Brock was a 25-year-old outfielder for the Cubs, who were fine offensively with Billy Williams, Ron Santo, and Ernie Banks. Chicago needed pitching, and Broglio was 18-8 in 1963, and had won 21 games as recently as 1960. Who knew that he would be 7-19 with the Cubs? Shantz was washed up, and never won a game for the Cubs (although he saved one). Brock, on the other hand, who came to the Cards with 310 hits and 50 stolen bases, had 2,713 hits and 888 stolen bases for St. Louis. Brock was sensational in his three World Series appearances, as well.

3. Nellie Fox for Joe Tipton, October 9, 1949

4. John Smoltz for Doyle Alexander, August 12, 1987

5. Nolan Ryan for Jim Fregosi, December 10, 1971

6. Curt Schilling for Omar Daal, Nelson Figueroa, Travis Lee, and Vicente Padilla, July 26, 2000

7. Curt Schilling for Casey Fossum, Brandon Lyon, and Jorge de la Rosa, November 28, 2003

8. Rogers Hornsby for Shanty Hogan and Jimmy Welsh, January 10, 1928

9. Joe Morgan, Jack Billingham, Cesar Geronimo, Ed Armbrister, and Denis Menke for Lee May, Tommy Helms, and Jimmy Stewart, November 29, 1971

10. Tom Seaver for Steve Henderson, Dan Norman, Pat Zachry, and Doug Flynn, June 15, 1977

Honorable Mention

The Seattle Mariners traded Derek Lowe and Jason Varitek to the Red Sox for reliever Heathcliff Slocumb in 1997.

The New York Yankees traded Willie McGee for a left-handed pitcher named Bob Sykes.

The Oakland A's traded Mark McGwire to St. Louis at the trade deadline in 1997 for Eric Ludwick, T.J. Mathews, and Blake Stein.

Daveyball.com

Year Main Participants in Trade

1964 Lou Brock - Ernie Broglio & Bobby Shantz

1971 Nolan Ryan - Jim Fregosi

1972 Steve Carlton - Rick Wise

1982 Ryne Sandberg - Ivan DeJesus

1900 Christy Mathewson - Amos Rusie

1951 Lew Burdette - Johnny Sain

1903 Mordecai Brown - Jack Taylor

1966 Fergie Jenkins - Larry Jackson & Bob Buhl

1965 Frank Robinson - Milt Pappas

1981 Willie McGee - Bob Sykes

1987 John Smoltz - Doyle Alexander

1971 Gaylord Perry - Sam McDowell

And the worst trade deadline deals according to ESPN

1. Cubs trade Lou Brock to the Cards for Ernie Broglio (June 15, 1964)

2. Red Sox send Jeff Bagwell to Houston for reliever Larry Andersen (Aug. 31, 1990)

3. A's send Mark McGwire to Cardinals for pitchers T.J. Mathews, Eric Ludwick and Blake Stein (July 31, 1997)

4. Tigers send John Smoltz to Braves for Doyle Alexander (Aug. 12, 1987)

5. Padres send Fred McGriff to Braves for OF Melvin Nieves and pitchers Donnie Elliott and Vince Moore (July 18, 1993)

6. Yankees send Jay Buhner to Seattle for Ken Phelps (July 21, 1988)

7. Mariners send Derek Lowe and Jason Varitek to Red Sox for Heathcliff Slocumb (July 31, 1997)

8. Astros send Freddie Garcia, Carlos Guillen and John Halama to Mariners for Randy Johnson (July 31, 1998)

9. Reds send Hank Sauer and Frankie Baumholtz to Cubs for Harry "Peanuts" Lowrey and Harry "The Hat" Walker (June 15, 1949)

10. Blue Jays send David Cone to Yankees for pitchers Marty Janzsen, Jason Jarvis and Mike Gordon (July 28, 1995)

Also receiving votes:

# Cardinals send Keith Hernandez to Mets for pitchers Neil Allen and Rick Ownbey (June 15, 1983)

# Indians send Jeromy Burnitz to Brewers for Kevin Seitzer (August 31, 1996)

# Royals send Dan Miceli and Jon Lieber to Pirates for Stan Belinda (July 31, 1993)

# Indians trade David Justice to Yankees for Ricky Ledee (June 29, 2000)

ESPN also did a Readers Poll and came up with a slightly different ranking.

1. Schilling, Harnisch, & Finley for Davis

2. Bagwell for Anderson

3. Brock for Broglio

4. Lowe & Varitek for Slocumb

5. Smoltz for Alexander

6. Sosa, Alvarez, & Fletcher for Baines & Manrique

7. Seaver for Zachry, Flynn, Henderson, & Norman

8. Garcia, Guillen, Halama for Randy Johnson

9. Johnson, Holman, & Harris for Langston

10. Buhner for Ken Phelps

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I live in Texas so I have the "oppurtunity" to watch the ridiculous machinations of the Rangers FO on a daily basis. IMO, they made one of the worst trades of the last decade- easily- and it cemented my opinion that Jon Daniels is a certified moron. Shortly after taking over the GM job in Oct. 05 at age 28 and a supposed "whiz-kid" this sub-mensa shipped out Alfonso Soriano for a bag of balls (or Brad Wilkerson, who might actually be worth less than a bag of balls). That was only the beginning, however. For a follow up he traded Chris Young, who was 26 years old and coming off a pretty impressive rookie season for a pitcher toiling in the Ballpark at Arlington and Adrian Gonzalez, a former #1 pick whom the Rangers, for reasons unkown to anyone outside of the braintrust that has yet to win a playoff game in 35 years, had been trying to give away for over a year. In return they recieved Adam Eaton, over-rated, oft-injured, and a year away from free-agency, and a good relief pitcher with an unspellable Japanese name, Otsuka. This to me hands down is the worst trade of the last few years, and if Liriano doesn't regain his health (a decent possibility) will easily be the worst trade of the era. I dare somebody to refute this.

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[stuff deleted]

1. Christy Mathewson for Amos Rusie, December 15, 1900

In 1900, the Cincinnati Reds thought they were getting a terrific pitcher in Rusie, who had won 241 games for New York before the turn of the century. Mathewson went on to win 373 games, all but one for the New York Giants. Rusie, elected to the Hall of Fame in 1977, never won a game for the Reds. The good news is that there was no sports talk radio, and no one got fired for pulling the trigger on this one-sided trade.

I agree about the trade, but the guy has his story all wrong. Nobody thought that was a good deal. It wasn't supposed to be a good deal. That was back during "syndicate baseball", when one guy owned multiple teams, so he could trade all the good guys to his NY team. The same guy who owned the Reds also owned some of the Giants, so he was stacking the Giants at Cincinnati's expense. The very same guy bought the old Orioles and screwed Baltimore by doing the exact same kind of thing. His name was John Brush, and the good news is that he's dead.

This is yet another case of alleged-sportswriters being lazy slackers and not knowing what they're talking about. (Not your fault.)

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Glenn Davis trade HAS to be the worst ever!!!!!:002_scry:

Cindy has it nailed, at least in terms of pure value. You can argue until you're blue in the face about whether the trade was justified at the time, but I'm just going on value after the deal. I've seen win shares analysis of the worst trades ever and this one came out on top. It's a trade of two early career (plausible) HOFers, and an All Star for the last 600 halfway decent at bats of a one-dimensional first baseman.

Adding up WARP3 after the trade Davis had 3.8. Schilling/Harnisch/Finley had about 228. That's roughly the equivalent of trading the career value of Babe Ruth for the career value of Jeff Tackett. It can't get much worse than that.

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Cindy has it nailed, at least in terms of pure value. You can argue until you're blue in the face about whether the trade was justified at the time, but I'm just going on value after the deal. I've seen win shares analysis of the worst trades ever and this one came out on top. It's a trade of two early career (plausible) HOFers, and an All Star for the last 600 halfway decent at bats of a one-dimensional first baseman.

Adding up WARP3 after the trade Davis had 3.8. Schilling/Harnisch/Finley had about 228. That's roughly the equivalent of trading the career value of Babe Ruth for the career value of Jeff Tackett. It can't get much worse than that.

Sweet Jesus.

So...that's bad. Alright everyone, a little safety tip...

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Cindy has it nailed, at least in terms of pure value. You can argue until you're blue in the face about whether the trade was justified at the time, but I'm just going on value after the deal. I've seen win shares analysis of the worst trades ever and this one came out on top. It's a trade of two early career (plausible) HOFers, and an All Star for the last 600 halfway decent at bats of a one-dimensional first baseman.

Adding up WARP3 after the trade Davis had 3.8. Schilling/Harnisch/Finley had about 228. That's roughly the equivalent of trading the career value of Babe Ruth for the career value of Jeff Tackett. It can't get much worse than that.

What was WARP3 for "No, No Nannette"?:D

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Cindy has it nailed, at least in terms of pure value. You can argue until you're blue in the face about whether the trade was justified at the time, but I'm just going on value after the deal. I've seen win shares analysis of the worst trades ever and this one came out on top. It's a trade of two early career (plausible) HOFers, and an All Star for the last 600 halfway decent at bats of a one-dimensional first baseman.

Adding up WARP3 after the trade Davis had 3.8. Schilling/Harnisch/Finley had about 228. That's roughly the equivalent of trading the career value of Babe Ruth for the career value of Jeff Tackett. It can't get much worse than that.

WOW!!!:)

Thanks Drungo!;)

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Another candidate for one of the worst trades of all time might be when Whitey Herzog dealt off Rollie Fingers, Pete Vukovich, and Ted Simmons to the Brewers for David Green, Sixto Lezcano, Larry Sorenson, and Dave LaPoint. The Brewers got the 1981 MVP and CYA winner (Fingers), the 1982 CYA (Vukovich), and a 2-time All Star selection (Simmons), whereas the Cardinals got journeymen level players (at best).

Lezcano and Sorenson were decent players, but both had truncated seasons in 1981 (injuries?) and were gone the next year. LaPoint pitched out of the bullpen for the Cardinals for several years, but was rarely even league average. However, David Green was supposed to be the gold plated prospect and second coming of Roberto Clemente, and turned out to be a terrible disappointment. Green did manage to play in the majors for 6 seasons and achieved mediocrity a couple of years, but nothing remotely close to what Herzog obviously expected of him.

Lezcano was bundled with Garry Templeton in the trade for Ozzie Smith and Sorenson was part of a 3-team trade that brought the Cardinals Lonnie Smith, so I suppose one could argue that trade went a long way towards determining who played in the 1982 World Series, but it still appears that the Brewers got by far the better deal.

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Is what I always wondered. Johnson was supposed to be THE hardest thrower of his time, maybe all time. I guess it's in the odd whipping motion. And like I said, his arm looks very long.

Plus, in pitching, or hitting a ball, baseball or golf, it's the guys with the easy fluid motion that throw the hardest. If you try to throw or swing hard, you end up with wasted motion. I'm thinking of Fred Couples here. He looks so easy and smooth. Like he's taking a half swing. And in his time he hit it as far as anyone.

Hey ScOtt, thanks for that great vid. First time I ever saw it, and I'm amazed.

Easy and fluid is one thing... but he has no follow-through! His right foot stays back the whole time. And some of those shots were from game play. Yet by all accounts he was the hardest thrower of his day.

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