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Dan Haren Traded to Dbacks--When is Bedard Going??


micahl69

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Everyone knows that Bedard isn't signing here, but that won't drive the price down. There are multiple teams on Bedard and the O's have time on their side. They don't have to deal him, yet.

Exactly. And I am the one guy who think he can still be signed. Oh, well.

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Beane can't drive Bedard price down. McPhail is the only one that can do that by accepting less for him then he is worth. As long as McPhail has the option of keeping him and signing him, Bedard's value should stay high.

Oh yes he can. Teams can point to the Haren deal and say, why should I give you any young ML players or more than one stud prospect? Haren is a better pitcher under control for three years and he only netted one. Why should we trade more for a lesser pitcher that is going to leave us in two years?

Bedard is not going to sign here unless we give him the 4/60 he's asking for. We aren't going to do that so he's not signing here. Our leverage is gone in that regard. Teams know we are not going to extend him.

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Oh yes he can. Teams can point to the Haren deal and say, why should I give you any young ML players or more than one stud prospect? Haren is a better pitcher under control for three years and he only netted one. Why should we trade more for a lesser pitcher that is going to leave us in two years?

Bedard is not going to sign here unless we give him the 4/60 he's asking for. We aren't going to do that so he's not signing here. Our leverage is gone in that regard. Teams know we are not going to extend him.

You say this but again I state my point: The trading of Haren could play a larger role in increasing the value of Bedard by getting rid of one less top of the rotation arm thats on the market.

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You say this but again I state my point: The trading of Haren could play a larger role in increasing the value of Bedard by getting rid of one less top of the rotation arm thats on the market.

So what? Blanton and Sheets are still out there as is Silva. And none of those guys will cost more than one top prospect, Silva is just $. Teams have other options that aren't as costly if we don't reduce our price on Bedard, something we wouldn't have had to do if Haren had been traded for two top prospects instead of just one.

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So what? Blanton and Sheets are still out there as is Silva. And none of those guys will cost more than one top prospect, Silva is just $. Teams have other options that aren't as costly if we don't reduce our price on Bedard, something we wouldn't have had to do if Haren had been traded for two top prospects instead of just one.

Why would we reduce our price on Bedard?

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Why would we reduce our price on Bedard?

To trade him. If he gets hurt or is less effective, we won't get offers like the ones we've been getting let alone anything better. At some point you have to pull the trigger. There is too much to risk by keeping him.

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Absolutely, he didn't even try to bid the Yankees or Red Sox against each other and other teams such as Cinci were interested as well. He went for quantity instead of quality. He could have recieved a much better package.

You are so far out to lunch on this one, yet I'm still fascinated by your wacky theory enough to ask.

What's the explanation here? Is Billy Beane really stupid, or just really lazy?

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You argue that the Haren return was low and brought down Bedard's value but I would just counter that and say the fact that Haren is OFF the market makes Bedard more valuable (to those who remain) by the logic of supply/demand.

I would have to agree according to the laws of supply and demand. Less quality arms on the market, in my mind, would seem to increase the value. It is all about having to wait until the other quailty arms are off the market. Problem is, how long can you wait without too many of your suitors going elsewhere?

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You are so far out to lunch on this one, yet I'm still fascinated by your wacky theory enough to ask.

What's the explanation here? Is Billy Beane really stupid, or just really lazy?

I'm not the only one who is unhappy with this trade. From what I've read the Oakland fans don't like this one either. Basically it gives them depth in the minors, but no star quality talent except for Gonzalez.

So Beane is dealing to replenish the farm, not stock a ML team for a run in two years as we are. As he put it:

"Quite frankly we need as many young players as we can get right now,"

http://www.contracostatimes.com/athletics/ci_7730638?nclick_check=1

So he wanted quantity over quality. If the Orioles had Haren, you can bet he would have gone for more quality than quantity. Yet because Haren and Bedard have about the same value, with the edge to Haren, teams look at that deal and see that Beane, who demands the moon for his players - only wanted one star quality player in return. So they expect the Orioles to follow suit.

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So what? Blanton and Sheets are still out there as is Silva. And none of those guys will cost more than one top prospect, Silva is just $. Teams have other options that aren't as costly if we don't reduce our price on Bedard, something we wouldn't have had to do if Haren had been traded for two top prospects instead of just one.

You're forgetting something: they aren't as good as Bedard.

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Found this interesting. You might too, JTrea...

A's score big

The few industry insiders who are critical of the A's return for right-hander Dan Haren say the team opted for quantity over quality.

Well, A's general manager Billy Beane didn't waste time asking for Justin Upton or Chris Young, who would have been likely — and impractical — starting points for many of his colleagues.

Pitcher Max Scherzer, the Diamondbacks' first-round pick in 2006, also was an unrealistic target — he is not eligible to be traded until May 31, one year after the date he signed.

Beane essentially settled for the best of the rest of the D-backs' highly regarded system. Most baseball people believe that he fared quite well.

One GM says that his club projects five of the six players from the Diamondbacks to be, at minimum, major-league regulars. Another team views outfielder Carlos Gonzalez, 22, as a potential star and left-hander Brett Anderson, 19, as a potential No. 2 starter.

"The fact of the matter is, we need players," Beane says. "One of the mistakes we made in the Atlanta deal (for Tim Hudson) is that we were too myopic. This time, we said, 'We're going to get as many good players as we can.'"

Beane was referring to his trade of Hudson three years ago for left-hander Dan Meyer, right-hander Juan Cruz and outfielder Charles Thomas. Meyer has been slowed by injuries, while Thomas lasted only 30 games and Cruz spent only one season with the club.

This time, Beane acquired twice as many players as he did in the Hudson deal, and all are younger than Cruz and Thomas were at the time of that trade. Left-hander Dana Eveland, the oldest player in the deal at 24, is expected to be in the A's 2008 rotation.

Gonzalez elicits sharply different opinions from scouts. Some view him as a five-tool wonder, while others question his ability to make contact and say he is going backward.

Outfielder Aaron Cunningham, 21, is a "poor man's Aaron Rowand," one scout says, improving every year and projecting as no worse than a fourth outfielder.

First baseman Chris Carter, 21, is a rare right-handed power-hitting prospect, described by another scout as "one of the most improved players I've seen in the past two years."

Left-hander Greg Smith, who turns 24 on Monday, is a "tick above" Braves lefty Chuck James, a rival executive says, and could pitch in the majors next season.

One more note on the trade: Three of the six players the Diamondbacks sent to the A's were acquired by D-backs GM Josh Byrnes in previous deals.

Eveland came from the Brewers in the Doug Davis trade, Cunningham from the White Sox for second baseman Danny Richar, and Carter from the White Sox for outfielder Carlos Quentin.

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