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Maryland To Big 10?!?!


JohnD

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Well...welcome to the Big Ten. I'm sure you'll grow to love it...or hate it...or both. Either way...welcome aboard.

As for further expansion, the Big Ten bylaws require that any new school that joins must be in a bordering state to a current Big Ten school. So...Georgia Tech would be impossible unless they change the bylaws.

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The people that are upset with this clearly don't understand what's going down. The money both academically and athletically that MD will receive from this move is huge. The ACC is about to become the Big East. Florida St. and Clemson are the next to go. It's quite possible that UNC and UVA join the Big 10 down the road too. Maryland had no choice, but to go. They would have been foolish to stay. MD was able to move to a major power broker conference and set up some security during this tumultuous time in college athletics. If they stayed in the ACC they very well may have ended up holding the bag.

Plus from and operations standpoint the Big 10 is the major leagues while the ACC is the low minors.

From where do you get the idea that "the ACC is about to become the Big East" and that these other schools will leave? Sounds to me like you are just justifying Maryland's decision by an ex post facto rationale. They "had no choice?" Of course they had a choice.

Frankly, I'm not that upset by Maryland's decision, but let's not pretend that they had to do this. They left a conference they've been in for 50 years, because they decided their "amateur" athletes could make them more money in another conference. They had all the choice in the world, and they went for the bucks. I'm not going to get moralistic about it, because the ACC has been poaching other conferences for the last decade, so they have no right to complain when someone does it to them. But I still find the whole state of college sports repugnant.

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Well...welcome to the Big Ten. I'm sure you'll grow to love it...or hate it...or both. Either way...welcome aboard.

As for further expansion, the Big Ten bylaws require that any new school that joins must be in a bordering state to a current Big Ten school. So...Georgia Tech would be impossible unless they change the bylaws.

NC schools would also be out unless they pick up UVa first.

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And that is different then Florida State...... How?
Maryland has beaten Florida State..on rare occasion. Tell me how this improves recruiting.

While you're at it, tell me how this helps, for example, the lacrosse and soccer programs, as in programs that have actually had some recent success? Let me guess, W.G.A.S. Soprano, those aren't big money programs.

I watched the 3 p.m. conference. Dr. Loh, what do you say to the student athletes whose programs were cut and ask where the $50 million exit fee is coming from? Damn good question and Loh sidestepped it. He talked about how (and it's not a definite) that some programs would be brought back. That still doesn't answer the question of why we have the money now, but we didn't have it then when the programs were cut. One assumes that it'll take some time to break even on the exit fees, given the added revenue from getting out football asses kicked harder on a regular, embarrassing basis. Loh noted that the fees would come solely from the athletic program, which he added is totally self-sustaining, no subsidies. Oh, really?

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It's a done deal. Unanimous vote by the board.

Not quite.

there was a "long discussion" that led to a vote that was "not unanimous." A second person, who requested anonymity based on the situation?s sensitivity, said the vote among regents was "almost" unanimous. A person said Sunday only a simple majority of the 16-member board was needed for the measure to pass.

Regent Tom McMillen, a former Maryland basketball player and U.S. Congressman, voted against the proposal, citing what he felt was a rushed process.

"I'm not saying the substance wasn't meritorious," McMillen said in a telephone interview. "There are arguments for it. But when you rush a process, it's antithetical. There was sympathy in some points, but it's all about money. It's all about money. That's what it is. . . .

"We should table it, and have input from those opposed to have all points of view. I would have loved to have heard from the coaches, the ACC, the players , but that's not the way it works.?"

According to McMillen, "three or four" regents were not present to vote.

Florestano said the board of regents "perceived" that Maryland's financial future in the Big Ten was brighter, but that members are "still debating" the exact figures.

"I didn't see paperwork to make one case or the other," McMillen said.

Talks between the Big Ten and Maryland progressed over the weekend, culminating in a Monday morning private telephone conference in which the regents voted and approved the proposal, according to multiple reports. The move immediately angered some alumni and fans by leaving behind longstanding rivalries and tradition within the ACC.

"Sad day to be a real [T]erp," Baltimore Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith, a former Terrapin, wrote on his Twitter account. Smith pointed out the astonishing change for Maryland athletics over the past 18 months:the retirement of basketball coach Gary Williams, the firing of alum Ralph Friedgen as football coach and now completely new matchups against unfamiliar opponents.

"No Friedgen, no Gary, new competition that I can't relate to," Smith wrote. ?No more UVA, Duke, NC talk. That?s weird. I still love the campus and the programs we have there, but I feel like if I were a recruit again I would've never chose MD because the reasons above are why I went there. Not being able to relate to anything at the school you graduated from is crazy."

At the afternoon news conference, Loh acknowledged the unhappiness being express by many prominent Maryland alumni.

source - Washington Post
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From where do you get the idea that "the ACC is about to become the Big East" and that these other schools will leave? Sounds to me like you are just justifying Maryland's decision by an ex post facto rationale. They "had no choice?" Of course they had a choice.

Frankly, I'm not that upset by Maryland's decision, but let's not pretend that they had to do this. They left a conference they've been in for 50 years, because they decided their "amateur" athletes could make them more money in another conference. They had all the choice in the world, and they went for the bucks. I'm not going to get moralistic about it, because the ACC has been poaching other conferences for the last decade, so they have no right to complain when someone does it to them. But I still find the whole state of college sports repugnant.

Better to be on the forefront of this movement than on the back-end. You've seen what has happened to the Big East. There's no guarantee that the ACC is next, but the weakest football conferences are going to be the ones to fall apart, and ACC football is not good at all. It will be better to be a mediocre team in a strong conference than a great team in what will be left of the ACC once the next phase of realignment goes through. Sure, technically, they had a choice, but once you consider logic, any other choice wouldn't make sense.

Hey recruit, come to Maryland. You'll get to travel to Ann Arbor and play in front of a packed crowd of 114,000.....and get your head kicked in.

Gee coach, where do I sign?

Football-wise, Maryland wouldn't be in any different of a situation than they are now when they've been 3-12 in conference the last two seasons. Maryland will never be on the same level as FSU, Clemson, or the U (even with their recent struggles) just like they will never be on the same level as Michigan, Ohio State, Nebraska or Penn State. So really, they're going to get blown out either way against certain teams, and believe me, recruits would much rather the opportunity to get blown out in a historic venue like The Big House or Ohio Stadium (both 100k+) than Doak Campbell (82k) or Sun Life Stadium (78k).

As far as I'm concerned, the problem started a long time ago when schools added all of these non-revenue sports and the effect of Title IX. Having one or two sports support the entirety of an athletic department is not a stable or sustainable model. It puts schools in a position to go where the money is. If they don't have the money, they can't support the sports, and then they risk public displeasure by having to cut sports that (relatively) no one cares about anyway.

And before anyone gets on my case, I swam in college, so I know how much support these teams get from the school and the public in some cases - no one cares about the team until all of a sudden someone says it's going away, then it's "How could the school do this!?" outrage!

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Better to be on the forefront of this movement than on the back-end. You've seen what has happened to the Big East. There's no guarantee that the ACC is next, but the weakest football conferences are going to be the ones to fall apart, and ACC football is not good at all. It will be better to be a mediocre team in a strong conference than a great team in what will be left of the ACC once the next phase of realignment goes through. Sure, technically, they had a choice, but once you consider logic, any other choice wouldn't make sense.

Football-wise, Maryland wouldn't be in any different of a situation than they are now when they've been 3-12 in conference the last two seasons. Maryland will never be on the same level as FSU, Clemson, or the U (even with their recent struggles) just like they will never be on the same level as Michigan, Ohio State, Nebraska or Penn State. So really, they're going to get blown out either way against certain teams, and believe me, recruits would much rather the opportunity to get blown out in a historic venue like The Big House or Ohio Stadium (both 100k+) than Doak Campbell (82k) or Sun Life Stadium (78k).

As far as I'm concerned, the problem started a long time ago when schools added all of these non-revenue sports and the effect of Title IX. Having one or two sports support the entirety of an athletic department is not a stable or sustainable model. It puts schools in a position to go where the money is. If they don't have the money, they can't support the sports, and then they risk public displeasure by having to cut sports that (relatively) no one cares about anyway.

And before anyone gets on my case, I swam in college, so I know how much support these teams get from the school and the public in some cases - no one cares about the team until all of a sudden someone says it's going away, then it's "How could the school do this!?" outrage!

I mentioned Title IX earlier and it surprised me no one else touched on that subject. While I believe woman should have the opportunity to compete in college programs I also agree the model is doomed to fail. You can't have two sports that make money supporting 30 to 40 others that don't. Or you have to have another economic model. Obviously this one isn't working.

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Frankly, I'm not that upset by Maryland's decision, but let's not pretend that they had to do this. They left a conference they've been in for 50 years, because they decided their "amateur" athletes could make them more money in another conference. They had all the choice in the world, and they went for the bucks. I'm not going to get moralistic about it, because the ACC has been poaching other conferences for the last decade, so they have no right to complain when someone does it to them. But I still find the whole state of college sports repugnant.

From a financial standpoint, they probably did have to do it, or risk shuttering even more teams in the future. Isn't this a team with a serious money problem?

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