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1B - Christian Walker #19


Tony-OH

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I'll tell you that when you tell me the last high school hitter taken after the 2nd round who made an impact in the major leagues over the last 20 years. LOL

(I realize that Delmonico was paid like a late 1st rounder or supplemental pick but no other team really thought he was worth that high a pick besides the Orioles)

Touche ;)

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  • 5 weeks later...
Walker is one of the best hitters I have ever seen, and i am pretty sure he will have a great pro career.

I hope so. He definitely was a winner in college, playing for a great program. The fact that he wasn't drafted until the 4th round tells you that scouts have some reservations about him.

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You are definitly a Walker hater.To say that Christians best attribute is his approach at the plate is just wrong. Probably one of the most negative things i have ever heard anyone say about him, and you probably have never even have seen him play, but it looks like you have read PG'S Scouting reports. The fact is that he is a better than Delmonico now and when the season starts you will see and change your thoughts and be on the Christian Walker Bandwagon.

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You are definitly a Walker hater.To say that Christians best attribute is his approach at the plate is just wrong. Probably one of the most negative things i have ever heard anyone say about him, and you probably have never even have seen him play, but it looks like you have read PG'S Scouting reports. The fact is that he is a better than Delmonico now and when the season starts you will see and change your thoughts and be on the Christian Walker Bandwagon.

Mrs. Walker?

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why are u such a Walker hater.You will be on the Christian Walker bandwagon a month after the season starts.I have never heard such negative commits.about a young player.I seems like it is personal. The kid is a great player and we should be lucky to have him.

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Steve Finley would be the only hitter taken after round 2 who had an impact, and he was in the 13th round of 1987. I suppose the next closest would be Willie Harris? Eli Whiteside?

Pathetic.

Willie would probably be the best, and yes, that's not a good record of drafting and developing hitters.

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Steve Finley would be the only hitter taken after round 2 who had an impact, and he was in the 13th round of 1987. I suppose the next closest would be Willie Harris? Eli Whiteside?

Pathetic.

Willie would probably be the best, and yes, that's not a good record of drafting and developing hitters.

Jerry Hairston, Jr. would be my pick.

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Jerry Hairston, Jr. would be my pick.

And you would be right. Forgot about Jerry. He was outstanding 11th round pick! Fred Peterson was his scout. He eventually went on to be the Red Sox West Regional Crosschecker and is now the Red Sox Midwest Crosschecker.

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