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This just in!!!! Milwaukee Brewers players used ADVIL!!!!! OMG WTF NEWS NEWS NEWS


Hank Scorpio

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I dont know, I actually found the article pretty interesting. We're not talking advil here. Painkillers can have some pretty dramatic effects and it looks like at least one of their players had a pretty bad reaction. I've never heard of toradol. It's clearly legal but perhaps there needs to be procedures in place that players are getting full disclosure from team physicians. I know I have to twist side effects from my physicians anytime they prescribe me something new.

'Man, I feel like crap,' and somebody would say, 'Oh, you should get a Toradol shot.' ” -- Jonathan Papelbon
In November, an article on the Digestive Health Institute website noted that because of the side effect of bleeding, England restricts the use of Toradol to hospitals, and other countries have banned the drug entirely
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I dont know, I actually found the article pretty interesting. We're not talking advil here. Painkillers can have some pretty dramatic effects and it looks like at least one of their players had a pretty bad reaction. I've never heard of toradol. It's clearly legal but perhaps there needs to be procedures in place that players are getting full disclosure from team physicians. I know I have to twist side effects from my physicians anytime they prescribe me something new.

I've never heard of it either, but I guarantee it'll be outlawed in a few weeks. This was the 2nd leading story on ESPN this morning... Jonathon Papelbon was INJECTED with something legal!!!!! Stop the presses!!!!!

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I've never heard of it either, but I guarantee it'll be outlawed in a few weeks. This was the 2nd leading story on ESPN this morning... Jonathon Papelbon was INJECTED with something legal!!!!! Stop the presses!!!!!

Yeah, I think it was the link/reference to the Red Sox and the Schilling stuff that makes it a "headliner" and arguably comes off a bit unfair in the article. Other than that, I thought the article was pretty interesting. Other than cortizone shots, I've not heard much with respect to the extent of players using painkillers. Sounds like clubhuses have pretty different philosphies on that.

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I've never heard of it either, but I guarantee it'll be outlawed in a few weeks. This was the 2nd leading story on ESPN this morning... Jonathon Papelbon was INJECTED with something legal!!!!! Stop the presses!!!!!

It's legal, but it is not an over the counter drug. It is an injection that is prescribed for short-term use for post operative patients, not for someone that has an achy knee. In this case, it is not being prescribed, it is just being routinely given out before games. It is a powerful drug that is being abused.

It has some pretty nasty side effects if used on a consistent basis, which is what a whole lot of athletes in college and the pros are doing. I think it is a pretty big deal and has actually been a fairly active story over the last few months. It's not about Papelbon, it's about the drug in question. It has been a pretty big deal whenever it has come up attached to an athlete. It has been in the spotlight when it was recently featured on Real Sports with guys like Brian Urlacher discussing its constant use and also when former USC lineman Armond Armstead had a heart attack at age 20 that may have been linked to the drug.

And I know you were being hyperbolic, but its a lot worse than Advil. It is the latest painkiller that athletes are getting hooked on and it could have some really bad consequences.

Controversy surrounding the drug has grown this year following claims by former USC lineman Armond Armstead that he suffered a heart attack after the 2010 season, at age 20, following shots of generic Toradol administered over the course of the season by the team doctor and USC personnel.

"I thought, you know, can't be me, you know? This doesn't happen to kids like me," Armstead told ABC News.

The manufacturers' warning label for generic Toradol (ketorolac tromethamine) says the drug is not intended for prolonged periods or for chronic pain and cites gastrointestinal bleeding and kidney failure as possible side effects of the drug.

In addition, like other drugs in its class, the generic Toradol label warns "may cause an increased risk of serious cardiovascular thrombotic events, myocardial infarction (heart attack), and stroke, which can be fatal."

"This risk may increase with duration of use," the so-called black box warning reads.

In a lawsuit against the school and the doctor, Dr. James Tibone, Armstead claims the school ignored the stated risks of the drug and never told him about them.

...

Armstead says he and many other USC players would receive injections of what was known only as "the shot" in a specific training room before big games and again at half-time.

"No discussion, just go in. He would give the shot and I would be on my way," Armstead told ABC News.

Armstead said the shot made him feel "super human" despite severe ankle, and later shoulder pain, and that without it, he never could have played in big USC games against Notre Dame and UCLA.

"You can't feel any pain, you just feel amazing," the former star player said.

...

The team doctor did confirm to ABC News that he used Toradol to treat Armstead's pain and that he continues to use the drug on other USC players.

"These are young, healthy people," he said. "We still use it, we use it diligently."

http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/risks-college-football-powerful-painkiller/story?id=18114915

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Last summer I had a two month long fight with a 7mm kidney stone. I hated the morphine they would inject me with because it would make me goofy. After awhile they started using Toradol and it was great. Relieved the pain like morphine, but without the psychoactive effects. Good stuff.

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Just looked it up on my wife's fancy pharmacist software. It's an NSAID. But a powerful one. Similar risk to Advil.

This is not PEDS. Its a legal drug for pain and repair. If adults are using if with doctors guidance so be it. It's up to them what risks they are willing to take. Injecting Toradol may be healthier then 6 Advil a day if that's the alternative.

All drugs should be taken with caution wether its Advil or morphine.

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Just looked it up on my wife's fancy pharmacist software. It's an NSAID. But a powerful one. Similar risk to Advil.

This is not PEDS. Its a legal drug for pain and repair. If adults are using if with doctors guidance so be it. It's up to them what risks they are willing to take. Injecting Toradol may be healthier then 6 Advil a day if that's the alternative.

All drugs should be taken with caution wether its Advil or morphine.

The point of the article is that there are concerns by independent medical advisors about its usage. Lovetoasters post amplifies that. You can't just assume that the team physician is always looking out for the best interest of the player/individual and that there isn't a conflcit there.

No offense, but if numerous countries have banned it or restrict it to hospital usage only, I don't think it's a "similar risk to advil".

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Just looked it up on my wife's fancy pharmacist software. It's an NSAID. But a powerful one. Similar risk to Advil.

This is not PEDS. Its a legal drug for pain and repair. If adults are using if with doctors guidance so be it. It's up to them what risks they are willing to take. Injecting Toradol may be healthier then 6 Advil a day if that's the alternative.

All drugs should be taken with caution wether its Advil or morphine.

Not to come down on this one statement but no pain relief medicine is for repair. They simply shut the brains ability to receive the message for pain. The medicine inhibits the production of prostaglandin, but does nothing to repair the damaged area.

That being said, this is going down a slippery slope if they are bringing this much attention to pain relievers. When I played I had a shoulder that was in constant pain,usually a back condition that flared up and hamstring problems. The shoulder by far was the worse condition, though, and if I didn't have access to pain meds I wouldn't have played.

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Not to come down on this one statement but no pain relief medicine is for repair. They simply shut the brains ability to receive the message for pain. The medicine inhibits the production of prostaglandin, but does nothing to repair the damaged area.

That being said, this is going down a slippery slope if they are bringing this much attention to pain relievers. When I played I had a shoulder that was in constant pain,usually a back condition that flared up and hamstring problems. The shoulder by far was the worse condition, though, and if I didn't have access to pain meds I wouldn't have played.

NSAIDS are anti-inflammatory; therefore, allow you to heal easier.

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Pfffft you should see the stuff they do in the NFL....

People don't want to know all of this stuff.

Oh, I absolutely agree with that. I don't know why people give the NFL a pass when it comes to drugs, but people seem so much more concerned about baseball. I guess because we care so much more about stats in baseball. But football should be the one that people are most concerned about, IMO. That is the one where elite athletes (often chemically enhanced) violently collide hundreds of times every game. Drugs help players get bigger and faster and help them feel no pain when they are hit or when they hit somebody. I would happily accept a slower, slightly less athletic NFL with players with a little less muscle, if it meant that players would live a little longer after they are done playing.

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