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Braun, Arod & others to be suspended...?


notfast

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While I do believe that there is a significant chance that the players in question are guilty I am still forced to root against MLB due to the nature in which they are operating.

Their "case" appears to depend upon the shoddy records kept by a disgraced Anthony Bosch. They obtained these records by the using the legal system as a bludgeon. It would not be a great leap to question those records.

MLB constantly lauds it's testing system, a number of these players did not fail tests.

To me, it is a pretty disgraceful show being put on by MLB.

It's ok to test. It is also ok to know. Both are fine for me. I don't want Pro Wrestling.

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It's ok to test. It is also ok to know. Both are fine for me. I don't want Pro Wrestling.

Shouldn't there be a reasonable burden of proof?

Do you really trust any document that Bosch hands over?

He is being coerced into handing them over, perhaps he is also being coerced into making sure certain players' names are on certain documents.

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Shouldn't there be a reasonable burden of proof?

Do you really trust any document that Bosch hands over?

He is being coerced into handing them over, perhaps he is also being coerced into making sure certain players' names are on certain documents.

Employers have pretty wide latitude to define their own "burden of proof" and for the most part can fire people at will. Certainly a different case here with the Players Union and CBA.

That said, the methodology and reach here does seem Orwellian to some degree.

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Employers have pretty wide latitude to define their own "burden of proof" and for the most part can fire people at will. Certainly a different case here with the Players Union and CBA.

That said, the methodology and reach here does seem Orwellian to some degree.

My wife works a union job. With a cba. If she fails a drug test she gets fired. If she is seen breaking work rules she gets fired. If several co-workers all say she broke work rules, she gets fired. And yeah, it is a bit Orwellian. All over the US these days.

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My wife works a union job. With a cba. If she fails a drug test she gets fired. If she is seen breaking work rules she gets fired. If several co-workers all say she broke work rules, she gets fired. And yeah, it is a bit Orwellian. All over the US these days.

I get it but none of those things really approach what MLB is doing here....at least not imo.

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I get it but none of those things really approach what MLB is doing here....at least not imo.

I can see your point. I just want them caught. Because I know they have been doing it. And I also understand that my opinion is less than reasonable.

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2 former Bosch associates said that Ms. Cruz, the spokeswoman for Cano's foundation, was billed $300 for a personal weight loss regimen; not PED's.

BTW, there may be up to 80 more names on the "lists" that have not yet been made public or handed over to MLB or media outlets.

Frankly, I don't believe this. (not YOU, but the Cano story itself).

You've got an outlet that is providing certain substances to many, many baseball players. A person closely tied to another baseball player just happens to buy something unrelated from the same outlet. That would be an absolutely remarkable coincidence.

When it comes to athletes and PEDs, I think it's time to stop being naive.

Cruz now claims that she never got anything from the clinic. So the clinic's records show that she paid for something that she never received?

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Frankly, I don't believe this. (not YOU, but the Cano story itself).

You've got an outlet that is providing certain substances to many, many baseball players. A person closely tied to another baseball player just happens to buy something unrelated from the same outlet. That would be an absolutely remarkable coincidence.

When it comes to athletes and PEDs, I think it's time to stop being naive.

Cruz now claims that she never got anything from the clinic. So the clinic's records show that she paid for something that she never received?

I thought the clinic records said she owed; that she hadn't paid. Once she found out the diet regimen involved pills, etc. she decided not to pursue it.

Anyway, according to Andrew Marchand at ESPN,

A senior New York Yankees official told ESPNNewYork.com the team has been informed by Major League Baseball officials that Robinson Cano is not in danger of being suspended in the ongoing Biogenesis scandal.

"Cano is not a part of this," the official said.

I think we can all agree that ESPN would love to be able to be the first to hoist Cano's head on a spear, but while it could change tomorrow, right now it seems Cano is not involved.

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I thought the clinic records said she owed; that she hadn't paid. Once she found out the diet regimen involved pills, etc. she decided not to pursue it.

Anyway, according to Andrew Marchand at ESPN,

A senior New York Yankees official told ESPNNewYork.com the team has been informed by Major League Baseball officials that Robinson Cano is not in danger of being suspended in the ongoing Biogenesis scandal.

"Cano is not a part of this," the official said.

I think we can all agree that ESPN would love to be able to be the first to hoist Cano's head on a spear, but while it could change tomorrow, right now it seems Cano is not involved.

From an ESPN report a couple of months ago:

Cruz, 31, says she was never a client of the Miami-area clinic at the heart of an ongoing performance-enhancing drug scandal, but records obtained by "Outside the Lines" list her as owing $300 in both July and August of last year. The records indicate that she paid the full balance in July, but the August records do not mention any payment.

Who knows what MLB has on Cano and what they don't. There's a lot of grey area here, because nobody is being forthright. It seems like Cruz was all "I don't have anything to do with the place" before eventually admitting she spoke to somebody in a parking lot. When people start to lie, there is usually a reason.

I'm still not sure I can swallow the notion that somebody affiliated with Cano just happens to be on the books of an outfit that sold PEDs to several other players, including some of Cano's close friends and teammates. It stinks.

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I am wondering what this means in Stark's story. There are not many names bigger, unless he is talking about from other sports. Who knows.

http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/9343279/tony-bosch-cooperation-biogenesis-investigation-lead-unprecedented-round-suspensions-mlb

Please be Lebron and Dwight Howard!!!!!

Please be Lebron and Dwight Howard!!!!!

Please be Lebron and Dwight Howard!!!!!

I am so sick of the NBA getting a free pass and absolutely can't stand either of these pompous jerks!

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I get it but none of those things really approach what MLB is doing here....at least not imo.

His wife gets fired if she flunks a drug test, even though she's a union member. A baseball player only gets suspended, loses pay for the period of the suspension, then goes back to work and continues to get a huge salary. You've got it backwards. Besides, most of these guys have already been paid enough to be set for life if they've invested it wisely. The ordinary Joe is not only out of a job and maybe broke with mortgage payments due; he's also going to have a difficult time finding another job. Quit crying about how tough these spoiled, overpaid athletes have it!

These players work under a Collective Bargaining agreement, negotiated between MLB and the players union. The CBA policy on drugs was well publicized and explained to them thoroughly before they voted on it. A majority of the players voted to accept the CBA.

Yes, the CBA is a lot tougher on drugs, primarily because union was afraid that Congress would intervene if they didn't go along with a tough drug policy. All these players knew that what they were doing violated federal and state laws, MLB regulations, and the CBA and that they faced harsh penalties if they got caught. They were gambling that they wouldn't get caught, and they lost. Many of them still were able to greatly enhance their income by cheating.

No one is going to get railroaded. Tony Bosch was coerced into cooperating with MLB because he couldn't afford the legal costs of defending himself from an MLB lawsuit, but that in and of itself doesn't discredit his testimony. His testimony is vital because his record keeping was deliberately sparse to camouflage his activities and the names of his clients, but it was sufficient for him to keep track of his clients and it will be sufficient to document the cases against his clients when supplemented with his testimony.

All of these clients knowingly violated the law, but few if any of them will face criminal charges because law enforcement authorities rarely prosecute the athletes who use performance enhancing drugs, except in the cases where they give perjured sworn testimony and interfere with investigations targeting the traffickers.

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His wife gets fired if she flunks a drug test, even though she's a union member. A baseball player only gets suspended, loses pay for the period of the suspension, then goes back to work and continues to get a huge salary. You've got it backwards. Besides, most of these guys have already been paid enough to be set for life if they've invested it wisely. The ordinary Joe is not only out of a job and maybe broke with mortgage payments due; he's also going to have a difficult time finding another job. Quit crying about how tough these spoiled, overpaid athletes have it!

These players work under a Collective Bargaining agreement, negotiated between MLB and the players union. The CBA policy on drugs was well publicized and explained to them thoroughly before they voted on it. A majority of the players voted to accept the CBA.

Yes, the CBA is a lot tougher on drugs, primarily because union was afraid that Congress would intervene if they didn't go along with a tough drug policy. All these players knew that what they were doing violated federal and state laws, MLB regulations, and the CBA and that they faced harsh penalties if they got caught. They were gambling that they wouldn't get caught, and they lost. Many of them still were able to greatly enhance their income by cheating.

No one is going to get railroaded. Tony Bosch was coerced into cooperating with MLB because he couldn't afford the legal costs of defending himself from an MLB lawsuit, but that in and of itself doesn't discredit his testimony. His testimony is vital because his record keeping was deliberately sparse to camouflage his activities and the names of his clients, but it was sufficient for him to keep track of his clients and it will be sufficient to document the cases against his clients when supplemented with his testimony.

All of these clients knowingly violated the law, but few if any of them will face criminal charges because law enforcement authorities rarely prosecute the athletes who use performance enhancing drugs, except in the cases where they give perjured sworn testimony and interfere with investigations targeting the traffickers.

But in this instance they are talking about suspending folks that haven't failed a test. The only proof they have is that of Bosch, both his inaccurate document trail and his coerced assistance.

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