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Granderson?


andrewrickli

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I would be thrilled with Granderson. I think he will be in our range cost wise, and his swing fits OPACY as well as it does Yankee Stadium. With Markakis in RF, we need a corner OFer with power. Granderson fits that description, and Granderson is a first class person.

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I don't think Granderson helps us out too much. I don't think his injuries are a huge concern, I think he'll bounce back, but even since 2008 (with the exception of 2011) he has been a power bat, high in Ks that often struggles a bit in the OBP category. If our line-up was constructed different, I think Granderson would be a great add, but I think we need more versatility in our line-up and that OBP and disciplined ABs should be our top target.

I wouldn't mind kicking the tires on Granderson and if he's a HUGE value, I'd consider it, but I would much rather fill LF (and all other line-up holes) with a more OBP minded solution.

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Id take granderson but id rather have beltran regardless of age. The last thing we need is another strikeout king. Besides beltran is the greatest postseason hitter in history.... yes please.

Sorry but we don't need a Vlad or DLee 2.0

We saw what happens with older players. They hit a wall, and its usually with us. Not to mention Beltran has been playing in the NL for most of his career, what makes you think he can duplicate it in the AL?

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Uh...Our RF is pretty short too, how many times have we seen Granderson go deep to Eutaw St?

Bottom line is that we need a LF'er, and preferably one with some attributes that can help us (power and speed). More importantly, he is in our price range, opposed to Choo or Ellsbury.

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Would love Grandy, but if you think the Yanks are letting him walk after just missing the playoffs, you're sorely mistaken.

What does this mean? The Yankees are in a bind, they need starting pitching, they need bullpen help, they are going to need to resign Cano. Where is all of this money coming from? They need to stay under the tax threshold this year as well. I wouldn't be surprised to see Granderson test the FA market.

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I don't think Granderson helps us out too much. I don't think his injuries are a huge concern, I think he'll bounce back, but even since 2008 (with the exception of 2011) he has been a power bat, high in Ks that often struggles a bit in the OBP category. If our line-up was constructed different, I think Granderson would be a great add, but I think we need more versatility in our line-up and that OBP and disciplined ABs should be our top target.

I wouldn't mind kicking the tires on Granderson and if he's a HUGE value, I'd consider it, but I would much rather fill LF (and all other line-up holes) with a more OBP minded solution.

The problem is that there aren't many OBP oriented OF'er on the market that are going to be way under 80M. Sure we oculd trade for a one but at what cost? Do you value prospects or cash more?

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from mlbtraderumors.com

  • Curtis Granderson's agent, Matt Brown, tells Dan Martin of the New York Post that the Yankees are his client's "first choice" and that "he absolutely wants to stay" in New York. Brown admitted that Granderson's injury-shortened 2013 season could impact his next contract "but I think people remember what he did the previous two years.”
  • Scouts tell Martin that Granderson isn't considered an injury risk going forward (his broken and forearm and fractured pinkie were both caused when he was hit by pitches) and there is speculation that the Rangers or Red Sox could be interested in Granderson's services. One scout wonders how Granderson will fare away from hitter-friendly Yankee Stadium while other expected Granderson should find a big contract given the lack of power bats on the open market.
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from mlbtraderumors.com
  • Curtis Granderson's agent, Matt Brown, tells Dan Martin of the New York Post that the Yankees are his client's "first choice" and that "he absolutely wants to stay" in New York. Brown admitted that Granderson's injury-shortened 2013 season could impact his next contract "but I think people remember what he did the previous two years.”
  • Scouts tell Martin that Granderson isn't considered an injury risk going forward (his broken and forearm and fractured pinkie were both caused when he was hit by pitches) and there is speculation that the Rangers or Red Sox could be interested in Granderson's services. One scout wonders how Granderson will fare away from hitter-friendly Yankee Stadium while other expected Granderson should find a big contract given the lack of power bats on the open market.

Right I'm sure he does want to stay, he probably has a house and his family in NY, he is comfortable there. However, NY might not have the money to bring him back as crazy as that sounds.

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The problem is that there aren't many OBP oriented OF'er on the market that are going to be way under 80M. Sure we oculd trade for a one but at what cost? Do you value prospects or cash more?
Looks like Granderson and Cruz might be too pricey. http://www.mlbtraderumors.com/2013/10/white-sox-expected-to-pursue-curtis-granderson.html. For less than 10 M a McLouth/R.Davis platoon would give you these splits: .342 v RHP, and .383 v LHP. Plus a boatload of SB. Other possibilities are Byrd . 336 OBP, Beltran? .339, and Murphy a career .347 v LHP.
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Looks like Granderson and Cruz might be too pricey. http://www.mlbtraderumors.com/2013/10/white-sox-expected-to-pursue-curtis-granderson.html. For less than 10 M a McLouth/R.Davis platoon would give you these splits: .342 v RHP, and .383 v LHP. Plus a boatload of SB. Other possibilities are Byrd . 336 OBP, Beltran? .339, and Murphy a career .347 v LHP.

I doubt we make a run at Cruz, he is past his prime and a roid user. Now off the roids AND past his prime, we should expect a decline.

No thanks on Beltran, he will be Vlad and D Lee part 2. He hasn't played in the AL as much recently. The past 10 years he's been in the NL. No thank you to Byrd either, he's having a career year.

I'm skeptical of a McLouth/R. Davis platoon only because without consistent playing time, players can become liabilities rather than assets.

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I doubt we make a run at Cruz, he is past his prime and a roid user. Now off the roids AND past his prime, we should expect a decline.

No thanks on Beltran, he will be Vlad and D Lee part 2. He hasn't played in the AL as much recently. The past 10 years he's been in the NL. No thank you to Byrd either, he's having a career year.

I'm skeptical of a McLouth/R. Davis platoon only because without consistent playing time, players can become liabilities rather than assets.

Well then I guess you are for Pearce in LF next year. Who else is there?
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