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Could Boston support two teams?


jeffstonefan

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Since no one seems to care about baseball in Florida, here is my (far-fetched) idea on how to improve baseball without contraction:

First build a brand new ballpark for the Red Sox.

Next, move the Marlins/Rays to Boston and have them play in Fenway Park. The fans that can never get into Fenway could goto games in the historic park and Sox fans will get a state of the art facility.

I realize that none of this would ever happen; but could the area support two teams?

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In case you haven't been following the news, both Florida teams are close to sealing new stadium deals that will help them thrive.

The Rays/Marlins play in poor baseball facilities in unfriendly locations. The Marlins current agreement with Huzienga is so unfavorable that even selling out every home game would not net profits.

You are perhaps being unfair to the fans by saying they don't care. Give them proper baseball facilities and the ability to actually generate revenue and the paradigm you are observing will certainly change.

The Marlins have a competent front office and the Rays are growing one so it is only a matter of time and government approval before they begin to thrive,

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Since no one seems to care about baseball in Florida, here is my (far-fetched) idea on how to improve baseball without contraction:

First build a brand new ballpark for the Red Sox.

Next, move the Marlins/Rays to Boston and have them play in Fenway Park. The fans that can never get into Fenway could goto games in the historic park and Sox fans will get a state of the art facility.

I realize that none of this would ever happen; but could the area support two teams?

Maybe they could build the stadium near Foxboro and call it a New England team like the Patriots. I don't know if it would work though,

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In case you haven't been following the news, both Florida teams are close to sealing new stadium deals that will help them thrive.

The Rays/Marlins play in poor baseball facilities in unfriendly locations. The Marlins current agreement with Huzienga is so unfavorable that even selling out every home game would not net profits.

You are perhaps being unfair to the fans by saying they don't care. Give them proper baseball facilities and the ability to actually generate revenue and the paradigm you are observing will certainly change.

The Marlins have a competent front office and the Rays are growing one so it is only a matter of time and government approval before they begin to thrive,

Perhaps fans in FL care, but they haven't shown it by supporting baseball at the gates (for the reasons you mentioned and many others). Can Boston support two teams?

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In parallel universe where there are no territorial restrictions, the minors aren't slaves of the majors, and no government subsidizes monopolists by building them $500M stadiums for free, every metropolitan area of any decent size would support multiple professional teams. A city the size of Boston (and the surrounding area) would probably have 2-3 teams in top level leagues, and many more in lower leagues. How do I know this? Because that's essentially the situation in English soccer and every city has multiple teams. The greater London area has literally dozens of teams including about half a dozen in the Premier League.

But in our universe where MLB strictly enforces artificial territorial rights, the minors are almost wholly owned by the majors, and mayors and governors fall over themselves writing massive checks to billionaire owners... only the very biggest cities will support more than one team. Boston, as rich and large as it is, is probably somewhere between Norfolk and Boise as a potential target for another MLB team. In other words, nowhere close even if the owners were in an expanding/relocating mood.

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In parallel universe where there are no territorial restrictions, the minors aren't slaves of the majors, and no government subsidizes monopolists by building them $500M stadiums for free, every metropolitan area of any decent size would support multiple professional teams. A city the size of Boston (and the surrounding area) would probably have 2-3 teams in top level leagues, and many more in lower leagues. How do I know this? Because that's essentially the situation in English soccer and every city has multiple teams. The greater London area has literally dozens of teams including about half a dozen in the Premier League.

But in our universe where MLB strictly enforces artificial territorial rights, the minors are almost wholly owned by the majors, and mayors and governors fall over themselves writing massive checks to billionaire owners... only the very biggest cities will support more than one team. Boston, as rich and large as it is, is probably somewhere between Norfolk and Boise as a potential target for another MLB team. In other words, nowhere close even if the owners were in an expanding/relocating mood.

Speaking for myself, it would be hard to root for a new team if Baltimore got one. I think many people used to rooting for the O's would have a hard time too.

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Could Boston support another team?

Even more whiny crybaby "the world revolves around us" pink hat wearing crybaby fans?

Ugh. Makes me nautious just to think about it.

Realistically though, what would be the incentive for Boston, NY, or any city's fans, to change their alliance to a new team, and giving up the history with the former team?

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Realistically though, what would be the incentive for Boston, NY, or any city's fans, to change their alliance to a new team, and giving up the history with the former team?

Exactly. That's what I bring up everytime this is mentioned. That, and what incentive does the government have to raise taxes to build a new stadium when there is no clamoring for a new team?

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Exactly. That's what I bring up everytime this is mentioned. That, and what incentive does the government have to raise taxes to build a new stadium when there is no clamoring for a new team?

It might work in 50 years when generations are raised with these teams in place and the cities continue to grow. But this is a very long term fix to the problems that exist today, and these problems might not even exist in a few years. Who knows what happens.

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Realistically though, what would be the incentive for Boston, NY, or any city's fans, to change their alliance to a new team, and giving up the history with the former team?

Winning would be an incentive to change for some people. I personally wouldn't root for the Nationals if they won the next three World Series, but I can bet you that many "long time" O's fans would consider the jump. Winning can change a lot of peoples loyalties (so can losing); especially for the casual fan.

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