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Long term, do you think Schoop will hit?


Frobby

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Has there been any correlation to his recent hot streak and the start of him using batting gloves? i cant pinpoint when he actually started using them, but I first noticed when things seemed to turn a corner a week or 2 ago.

I'm not sure which corner that was, since he's posted an OPS of .529 over the past 14 days and .556 over the past 28.

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Much easier to work on stuff in the minors when you don't have access to the best personnel and technology to help you. :rolleyes:

Yes he will hit. Not for a huge average or OBP but with enough power and defense to hold down a job for a number of years.

I might suggest, that an organization should place its best coaches and teachers in the minors. They'll never have the best tech there, so it especially important. If kids are unprepared for college, they will find it more difficult. If kids are well prepared the adjustments to the next level could have many turns.

I'm not saying that his the case for the O's, but I think that should be the philosophy (and compensate the coaches accordingly).

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I might suggest, that an organization should place its best coaches and teachers in the minors. They'll never have the best tech there, so it especially important. If kids are unprepared for college, they will find it more difficult. If kids are well prepared the adjustments to the next level could have many turns.

I'm not saying that his the case for the O's, but I think that should be the philosophy (and compensate the coaches accordingly).

The problem with that is, realistically, how many actual prospects are on each team? Do the O's even have one position prospect per minor league team right now? I don't mean cup of coffee guys, guys that have actual big league careers.

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Probably, but I grow tired of hearing how many homers he could hit as an indication of hitting success.

Look no further than Chris Davis this year for insight into how power is not enough. Give me .285 and 12 homers over .200 and 20.

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Probably, but I grow tired of hearing how many homers he could hit as an indication of hitting success.

Look no further than Chris Davis this year for insight into how power is not enough. Give me .285 and 12 homers over .200 and 20.

Sure, why not? Heck give me 370 and four.

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What does Roy think? :scratchchinhmm:

I like what I see thus far - not overmatched at all - just hacking at a lot of bad pitches at times. Under the tutelage of Cruz and Manny he might be dang good - Grich-lite?

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What does Roy think? :scratchchinhmm:

I like what I see thus far - not overmatched at all - just hacking at a lot of bad pitches at times. Under the tutelage of Cruz and Manny he might be dang good - Grich-lite?

Grich's career OBP is 105 points higher then his BA. Schoop is not going to get close to that. I think something closer to Hardy at second.

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The problem with that is, realistically, how many actual prospects are on each team? Do the O's even have one position prospect per minor league team right now? I don't mean cup of coffee guys, guys that have actual big league careers.

The percent of "real" prospects that make it and have average or above average careers is small indeed. Perhaps, if there were better coaches in the minors more might make it. More importantly, perhaps there are non-prospects nuggets out there that if the coaches were better teachers might have an impact. MiL baseball is no treat for the players and coaches. Lousy travel, poor food allowances, lighting different from stadium to stadium, etc. So, the players have huge adjustments for some at a very young age. I remember a quote from Paul Blair early in his career about him hitting better in the majors vs the minors. He said in effect, better lighting. There are so many variables that determine any player's success. It would be nice to eliminate at least one.

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The percent of "real" prospects that make it and have average or above average careers is small indeed. Perhaps, if there were better coaches in the minors more might make it. More importantly, perhaps there are non-prospects nuggets out there that if the coaches were better teachers might have an impact. MiL baseball is no treat for the players and coaches. Lousy travel, poor food allowances, lighting different from stadium to stadium, etc. So, the players have huge adjustments for some at a very young age. I remember a quote from Paul Blair early in his career about him hitting better in the majors vs the minors. He said in effect, better lighting. There are so many variables that determine any player's success. It would be nice to eliminate at least one.

It would, and I have suggested, for instance, that the MLB teams invest in Chefs and Nutritionists for their MiLB teams.

But the idea of taking the best coaching and putting in the minors just doesn't seen tenable to me. Which team are you going to put them at? You could say earlier was better but then prospects out of college would miss them. You have them at too late a team and bad habits will have formed. You make them roving and no one gets enough individual attention for it to do any good.

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I think Schoop's ceiling is Hardy's bat.

Bingo... Good comparison.

I like the Orioles approach of giving him a lot of at bats even though he's struggling. They did it with Markakis and the Sox did it with Pedroia back in the day.

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