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Long term, do you think Schoop will hit?


Frobby

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And the point would be?
No one ever played with the name beginning with X, M has probably more 500 HR club members than any other letter and Q is no longer Jamie Quirk, but Carlos Quentin, and U never was Bob Ucker but now is Dan Uggla, soon to be Chase Utley, and maybe one day Henry Urrutia..
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No one ever played with the name beginning with X, M has probably more 500 HR club members than any other letter and Q is no longer Jamie Quirk, but Carlos Quentin, and U never was Bob Ucker but now is Dan Uggla, soon to be Case Utley, and maybe one day Henry Urrutia..

Uecker has a better chance of coming out of retirement.

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No one ever played with the name beginning with X, M has probably more 500 HR club members than any other letter and Q is no longer Jamie Quirk, but Carlos Quentin, and U never was Bob Ucker but now is Dan Uggla, soon to be Chase Utley, and maybe one day Henry Urrutia..

Like I thought, no point.

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I don't think height and weight have all that much to do with power. Hank Aaron was 6' 180 lbs., Mantle 5'11' 195 lbs Schoop won't hit as many HR as either of those two little guys. He will hit more than Walter Young, 6'5" 315 lbs.

I think you can find outliers who hit for power despite small stature. You can certainly find a bunch of fairly short guys like Hack Wilson who were build like fullbacks and could hit for power. You'll find fewer players who were short and skinny who hit for power. Maybe you'd be better off using BMI.

In any case, if you ask me to judge players' power only by height/weight, I think I'd do ok if I moderately, but positively correlated the two. The average 6' 4", 230 pound guy is going to hit for more power than the average 5' 9", 175 guy.

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I think you can find outliers who hit for power despite small stature. You can certainly find a bunch of fairly short guys like Hack Wilson who were build like fullbacks and could hit for power. You'll find fewer players who were short and skinny who hit for power. Maybe you'd be better off using BMI.

In any case, if you ask me to judge players' power only by height/weight, I think I'd do ok if I moderately, but positively correlated the two. The average 6' 4", 230 pound guy is going to hit for more power than the average 5' 9", 175 guy.

I wouldn't bother with size at all, I'd look at bat speed, which is a much more important factor in hitting for power. I wouldn't call Mantle, Aaron, or Ott outliers. The point was being made that Schoop will hit for more power than Hardy because he is taller and heavier. I take it using your formula you concur.
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I wouldn't bother with size at all, I'd look at bat speed, which is a much more important factor in hitting for power. I wouldn't call Mantle, Aaron, or Ott outliers. The point was being made that Schoop will hit for more power than Hardy because he is taller and heavier. I take it using your formula you concur.

I said that if you only gave me height and weight and ask me to project power I'd do okay in the aggregate. If you also gave me bat speed I'd do better.

I think that Schoop might hit for more power than Hardy because of his stature, but stature is just one of many variables correlated to power.

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Don't forget it was 257 to the RF line in the Polo Grounds, and Mel hit 63% (323) of his homers there.

And Ruth had 295 for his short right field fence in his home stadium, heard rumors over the years, that it might have been shorter than the official 295.

Not trying to take anything away from Ruth, the fences were the same for the rest of the batters, not like they moved it, when only he was batting.

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I don't think height and weight have all that much to do with power. Hank Aaron was 6' 180 lbs., Mantle 5'11' 195 lbs Schoop won't hit as many HR as either of those two little guys. He will hit more than Walter Young, 6'5" 315 lbs.

They absolutely do, despite the exceptions. Force equals mass x acceleration. Just looking at the home run leaders for 2014:

1. Jose Abreu: 6'3, 255

2. Nelson Cruz, 6'2, 230

3. Edwin Encarnacio, 6'1, 230

4. Giancarlo Stanton, 6'6, 240

5. Anthony Rizzo, 6'3, 240

6. Mike Trout, 6'2, 230

7. Victor Martinez, 6'2, 210 (I think he's more 225-230)

8. Troy Tulowitzki, 6'3, 215

9. Brandon Moss, 6'0, 210

10. Josh Donaldson, 6'0, 221

It's no coincidence that skinny guys like Dee Gordon and Billy Hamilton don't hit for pop. The little guys can usually get the acceleration part down, but not the mass.

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I said that if you only gave me height and weight and ask me to project power I'd do okay in the aggregate. If you also gave me bat speed I'd do better.

I think that Schoop might hit for more power than Hardy because of his stature, but stature is just one of many variables correlated to power.

Probably the least among those variables. Velocity of pitch, and coefficient of restitution of the ball, velocity of bat swing, weight and coefficient of restitution of the bat, followed by body mass. And body mass in the lower half matters more than upper body mass. So maybe Schoop will hit for more power than Hardy, he's got a bigger butt.
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