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Long term, do you think Schoop will hit?


Frobby

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I said that if you only gave me height and weight and ask me to project power I'd do okay in the aggregate. If you also gave me bat speed I'd do better.

I think that Schoop might hit for more power than Hardy because of his stature, but stature is just one of many variables correlated to power.

Actually making contact with the baseball is pretty important. Hardy strikes out about once every 7 times to the plate, Schoop 1 out of 5.

By the way, Hardy broke in at age 22, same age as Schoop is now, and posted .247/.327/.384. His power developed later. But, he was doing a lot better in the OBP department than Schoop.

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Additionally, I'd imagine that the stolen base leaders throughout history were, on average, far far lighter than their home run counterparts. There are occasional Bo Jacksons and Mike Trouts who can run like the wind with hefty frames — but there are gonna be far more Vince Colemans.

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Probably the least among those variables. Velocity of pitch, and coefficient of restitution of the ball, velocity of bat swing, weight and coefficient of restitution of the bat, followed by body mass. And body mass in the lower half matters more than upper body mass. So maybe Schoop will hit for more power than Hardy, he's got a bigger butt.

I'm not going to quibble, I just think that stature clearly has an impact. Wish it didn't, speaking as a 5' 7", 145 pounder. But it does.

Lower body strength is certainly important, too. I have the upper body strength of a 60-year-old woman, but soccer legs, and at least used to be able to turn on a softball and hit it almost to the warning track. Which taught me to hit line drives up the middle...

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I'm not going to quibble, I just think that stature clearly has an impact. Wish it didn't, speaking as a 5' 7", 145 pounder. But it does.

Lower body strength is certainly important, too. I have the upper body strength of a 60-year-old woman, but soccer legs, and at least used to be able to turn on a softball and hit it almost to the warning track. Which taught me to hit line drives up the middle...

I forget the exact numbers but an increase in body mass has a very minimal effect on average HR distance, something like 4 or 5 feet for a 20% increase in body mass. Virtually irrelevant IMO.
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And Ruth had 295 for his short right field fence in his home stadium, heard rumors over the years, that it might have been shorter than the official 295.

Not trying to take anything away from Ruth, the fences were the same for the rest of the batters, not like they moved it, when only he was batting.

The original Yankee Stadium was indeed 296 feet down the rightfield line, BUT ......

it also had 2 major factors that made it incredibly easy for left-handed pull hitters to hit round-trippers.

A) Unlike Fenway Park (302-foot Pesky Pole in rightfield, which IMMEDIATELY gets deeper at a very steep pace), the original Yankee Stadium rightfield home run porch/wall STAYED very shallow for quite a way toward the center of the field.

B) In addition to being an extremely short distance from home plate, the wall was ONLY 4 FEET HIGH.

Oo

blueseatspart330.jpg

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o

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Sorry, the sponsor ads block part of the view (right up the line), which shows just how short (BOTH in distance AND in height) that the rightfield home run porch was in the original Yankee Stadium (1923-1973.)

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The original Yankee Stadium was indeed 296 feet down the rightfield line, BUT ......

it also had 2 major factors that made it incredibly easy for left-handed pull hitters to hit round-trippers.

A) Unlike Fenway Park (302-foot Pesky Pole in rightfield, which IMMEDIATELY gets deeper at a very steep pace), the original Yankee Stadium rightfield home run porch/wall STAYED very shallow for quite a way toward the center of the field.

B) In addition to being an extremely short distance from home plate, the wall was ONLY 4 FEET HIGH.

That kind of configuration wasn't that uncommon. League Park in Cleveland, Baker Bowl in Philly, various other stadiums had dimensions that would look silly today. Like 275 foot foul lines, and not much over 300 in one of the gaps.

Of course old Yankee was terribly lopsided, being 461 (at least for a while) in LC. And there were a bunch of other parks like Griffith Stadium in DC and Braves Field in Boston with unreachably long fences in at least several directions.

In all of this new stadium construction with frankly illogical dimensions and fence quirkiness I wish someone had made a park with some giant, ISTP-HR friendly dimensions.

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Of course, old Yankee was terribly lopsided, being 461 (at least for a while) in LC.

Which is why Joe DiMaggio's 361 career home runs in his war-shortened, 13-year career was extremely impressive to me.

The original Yankee Stadium was a dream to left-handed batters, and a nightmare to right-handed batters.

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They absolutely do, despite the exceptions. Force equals mass x acceleration. Just looking at the home run leaders for 2014:

1. Jose Abreu: 6'3, 255

2. Nelson Cruz, 6'2, 230

3. Edwin Encarnacio, 6'1, 230

4. Giancarlo Stanton, 6'6, 240

5. Anthony Rizzo, 6'3, 240

6. Mike Trout, 6'2, 230

7. Victor Martinez, 6'2, 210 (I think he's more 225-230)

8. Troy Tulowitzki, 6'3, 215

9. Brandon Moss, 6'0, 210

10. Josh Donaldson, 6'0, 221

It's no coincidence that skinny guys like Dee Gordon and Billy Hamilton don't hit for pop. The little guys can usually get the acceleration part down, but not the mass.

Yes but acceleration part is more important than mass in this case. It's not because they are big guys that they generate bat speed. It's their swing mechanics. The 20-25 % extra body mass doesn't account for more than 9 feet on their average HR distance.

Willy Mays 5'10'170 lbs

Hank Aaron 6' 180 lbs

Griffey 6' 3" 195 lbs

Frank Robinson 6'1" 183 lbs

Reggie Jackson 6' 195 lbs

Mickey Mantle 5'11" 195 lbs

Raffy Palmeiro 6' 180 lbs

Jimmy Fox 6'195 lbs

Eddie Mathews 6'1" 190 lbs

Ernie Banks 6'1" 180 lbs

Eddie Maurray 6'2" 190 LBS

Mel Ott 5'9" 170 lbs'

Every one of these little guys hit 500 + HR I'd be surprised if any of the goliaths on your list did.

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And Ruth had 295 for his short right field fence in his home stadium, heard rumors over the years, that it might have been shorter than the official 295.

Not trying to take anything away from Ruth, the fences were the same for the rest of the batters, not like they moved it, when only he was batting.

Which is why Joe DiMaggio's 361 career home runs in his war-shortened, 13-year career was extremely impressive to me.

The original Yankee Stadium was a dream to left-handed batters, and a nightmare to right-handed batters.

Ruth hit 347 homers at home, 367 on the road, so while I am sure he hit an occasional cheapie in Yankee Stadium, it seems unlikely that it was a big factor in his HR total. DiMaggio, on the other hand, hit 148 HR at home, 213 on the road, so it's pretty apparent that the dimension in LF in Yankee Stadium really hurt his HR total.

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This is why Ruth hit HR. No one could swing like that today. Takes too much time. Interesting, his stance is similar to Ichiro's. re: that RF porch, I'd like to se the numbers on how many he hit down there. Probably not as many as Maris did.

Ruth-Babe-Side.gif

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This is why Ruth hit HR. No one could swing like that today. Takes too much time. Interesting, his stance is similar to Ichiro's. re: that RF porch, I'd like to se the numbers on how many he hit down there. Probably not as many as Maris did.

Ruth-Babe-Side.gif

Maris only played seven years for the Yankees (203 total HR).

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This is why Ruth hit HR. No one could swing like that today. Takes too much time. Interesting, his stance is similar to Ichiro's. re: that RF porch, I'd like to se the numbers on how many he hit down there. Probably not as many as Maris did.

Ruth-Babe-Side.gif

That is some massive load on that 54 oz bat.

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I think JJ Hardy is a pretty good shorthand comp/expectation. .300 OBA with 20 doubles and 20 bombs. .730ish OPS in his prime with a year or two where everything goes right and he flirts with .800. A pretty valuable player in other words.

From what he's shown so far, a .300 OBA is no cinch. He's got to be at least a little more selective for the above scenario to come true.

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