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The Orioles are the Oakland Athletics of the East


Uli2001

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The Giants had one of the best pitchers in the game and all star caliber guys like Posey, Panda, and Pence. They were talented.

The Kansas City baseball team that shall not be named had one of the luckiest streaks in any sport I have ever seen. They won the crapshoot, and they still freaking lost. Get out of here with that.

The Giants won 88 games, they were no better than the third best team in the National League. The Dodgers and the Nationals were both significantly better than the Giants.

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I think a more appropriate comparison for our organization to seek to emulate are the St. Louis, Atlanta, San Francisco models- teams which have been, on average, just in the tier above the Orioles, but have never been in the top tiers (Yankees who are in a tier by themselves, second tier of LA Dodgers, Boston, NY Mets (poor success for all those dollars), LA Angels. The Cardinals, Braves, Giants have all maintained their MLB payroll rankings near 10th place over the last 15 years- Cardinals have ranked 10.4, Giants at 10.3, Braves at 10.8. But even those clubs have ranged at times from 2nd in payroll one year to as low as 17th in other years. Oakland, while highly successful, as is Tampa Bay in terms of success related to overall payroll, are not easy models to emulate.

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The Giants had one of the best pitchers in the game and all star caliber guys like Posey, Panda, and Pence. They were talented.

The Kansas City baseball team that shall not be named had one of the luckiest streaks in any sport I have ever seen. They won the crapshoot, and they still freaking lost. Get out of here with that.

This is a good post.

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Seeing the Nationals sign Max Scherzer for a $210 mil contract shines light on the fact that the Orioles version of moneyball never even has them in this kind of conversation.

Just like Oakland, their strategy is good enough to field a contender that makes the playoffs more often than not, but in this day and age of baseball, the World Series winningteams are the ones that spend big. Just go through the list of the World Series winners from the past decade. Moneyball gets you in the playoffs, but does not win titles.

The Orioles were big spenders in the mid-1990's, and it should have gotten them a title in 1997 except for the bounce of the ball. After that, Peter Angelos apparently decided first that he did not want to spend enough to compete, and then later that he would spend only under a moneyball strategy.

This is just not true. The Giants won the same number of World Series titles in the last 15 years (3) as the Boston Red Sox (3) but averaged 10.3 place in MLB payroll ranking average compared to the Red Sox payroll ranking average of 3.7. The Cardinals were the next most successful with two World Series titles and averaged almost exactly the same average payroll ranking as the Giants- 10.4

The Yankees were extreme spenders and have two World Series championships to show in the last fifteen years though they have ranked number one every year in spending for the last 15 except last year when they were second. The Dodgers were third in all of baseball in payroll spending average ranking in the last 15 years and have ZERO World Series championships to show in that time frame. The Mets were 4th in all of baseball in average payroll ranking in the last 15 years and have ZERO championships and one World Series appearance (in 2000) to show for all their budget.

And the teams with the most playoff appearances without World Series championship would be the Braves who have had 9 playoff appearances in the past 15 years without a World Series title or appearance. And they too were not "moneyballers". Their payroll average is almost exactly the same as St. Louis and San Francisco at 10.8 The Braves clearly had more playoff appearances without a World Series championship than any other team in baseball and are not "moneyballers."

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So, you're philosophy is just make moves whether they work out in the long run or not. Glad we don't have a GM that believes in this way of doing business. I'll stick with our track record since DD has shown up

My philosophy is to make moves when we have to. I'm not saying we have to be as "aggressive" as Oakland (i.e., trading Cespedes, Donaldson, and Moss), but when we loss players via free agency, without clear replacements moves need to be made.

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There are 10 teams in the MLB postseason. Other than extremely rare cases in which a team makes a lucky run like the Kansas City baseball team, it's good team vs. good team the whole way through.

The Stanley Cup playoffs contain 16 teams, you see upsets all the time, and even as recently as 2012, an 8 seed won the Cup.

Which one is a crapshoot, again?

NHL being a crapshoot doesn't preclude MLB from being one also.

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Who are the two winningest teams in the AL during the regular season over the last three years?

The A's have won 278 games during the regular season over that last three years. The O's have won 274 games. They are the two winningest team over the last three years in the AL.

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Yet they dominated and won a WS recently. If the Orioles go on to win the WS on their current moneyball strategy (which I hope they do) then call me a believer. The A's were not able to do it and they put together pretty good teams.

The short series in the playoffs mean that whoever has the best starting pitching and power hitters usually prevails. And these are expensive pieces.

Based on their current payroll level, what is the alternative, viable strategy?

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