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The Orioles are the Oakland Athletics of the East


Uli2001

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I remember that 2001 Mariners team very well....I thought they were an 86 win team on paper that won 30 more than I thought they would. I thought the Yankees were actually a more talented team in terms of personnel than Seattle, had much more experienced in big situations, came from near death to beat Oakland, and were riding a huge momentum wave from 9/11. I was not surprised at all that Seattle lost that series to New York. What I was very surprised about was that Arizona came back and won the World Series....still the happiest non-Oriole event of my baseball life.

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It's hard to predict baseball over a week of games or a seven-game series, that is clear. But over multiple seasons, it is quite predictable. Hitters will hit to their average, and pitchers will pitch to their ERA (barring injury). This is why this is the most scrutinized sport in terms of numbers. And the statistical fact is that big-spenders tend to win the WS and the thrifty teams tend to be happy to make the playoffs. There is no reason why a team with the tradition and large fan base the Orioles have, with that TV contract, cannot be a top 8 spender in MLB every year.

So if a team makes the playoffs, the teams then engage in week long series to win the World Series, no? And, by your own definition above, it is hard to predict who will win the playoffs and World Series because they are just that.

Please show me your data for your idea that "big spenders tend to win the WS and thrifty teams tend to be happy to make the playoffs." The only two teams to win three championships in the last 15 years are ONE big spending team, Boston Red Sox, and one NON big spending team San Francisco Giants (average 10th in spending over the last fifteen years). The only teams to win two World Series in the last fifteen years are ONE big spending team, NY Yankees, and one NON big spending team, St. Louis Cardinals (average 10th in spending over the last fifteen years). Non big spending teams such as the Florida Marlins and Arizona Diamondbacks have won World Series during this time frame while big spenders such as the NY Mets and LA Dodgers have won ZERO World Series championships in the last fifteen years. Read more on this topic here..http://www.orioleshangout.com/blog/hangouters-highlights/714/hhp-tntoriole-throws-some-data

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So if a team makes the playoffs, the teams then engage in week long series to win the World Series, no? And, by your own definition above, it is hard to predict who will win the playoffs and World Series because they are just that.

Please show me your data for your idea that "big spenders tend to win the WS and thrifty teams tend to be happy to make the playoffs." The only two teams to win three championships in the last 15 years are ONE big spending team, Boston Red Sox, and one NON big spending team San Francisco Giants (average 10th in spending over the last fifteen years). The only teams to win two World Series in the last fifteen years are ONE big spending team, NY Yankees, and one NON big spending team, St. Louis Cardinals (average 10th in spending over the last fifteen years). Non big spending teams such as the Florida Marlins and Arizona Diamondbacks have won World Series during this time frame while big spenders such as the NY Mets and LA Dodgers have won ZERO World Series championships in the last fifteen years. Read more on this topic here..http://www.orioleshangout.com/blog/hangouters-highlights/714/hhp-tntoriole-throws-some-data

I don't see what averaging over 15 years has to do with this discussion. A team can spend big ("go for it") over a few seasons and win. I didn't say that you have to be a big spender over 15 years to win. Also, being in the top 10 in spending (SF and SL) to me is not being thrifty. How does the O's score there? (No need to run the average over the last 15 years, say the last 5 years).

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I don't see what averaging over 15 years has to do with this discussion. A team can spend big ("go for it") over a few seasons and win. I didn't say that you have to be a big spender over 15 years to win. Also, being in the top 10 in spending (SF and SL) to me is not being thrifty. How does the O's score there? (No need to run the average over the last 15 years, say the last 5 years).

Read the article. Your problem is not being specific about what you mean except to repeat the falsehood that only big spenders win the World Series which is simply untrue. Your argument has no examples or data.

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