Jump to content

Cracks in the Armor


weams

Recommended Posts

The actual tweet:

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Rafael Soriano is leaving agent Scott Boras, per source familiar with the situation. He wants to sign with a team. He's still a free agent.</p>— James Wagner (@JamesWagnerWP) <a href="

">May 29, 2015</a></blockquote>

<script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

I have said it before, if you are not a tier 1 guy Boras is not the agent for you. I think some folks think that by signing with Boras they become a tier 1 player.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The actual tweet:

<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Rafael Soriano is leaving agent Scott Boras, per source familiar with the situation. He wants to sign with a team. He's still a free agent.</p>? James Wagner (@JamesWagnerWP) <a href="

">May 29, 2015</a></blockquote>

<script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

I have said it before, if you are not a tier 1 guy Boras is not the agent for you. I think some folks think that by signing with Boras they become a tier 1 player.

Soriano had it pretty good the past two years.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know that THATS true, but some players(Guthrie) leave Boros because they don't like his style. Clearly though, love em or hate em, He's the best in the baseball business.

Only if you're elite. Ask Drew and Morales what he did for them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Only if you're elite. Ask Drew and Morales what he did for them.

No offense to you waroriole, not picking on you specifically, but I get so tired of seeing stuff like this about Boras. Drew and Morales are every bit as responsible as Boras for their situation(s) -- I would say that the most blame falls with the players themselves. Ultimately, it seems the qualifying offer was their biggest hindrance.

At the end of the day, the players make the decisions on where they play and what they play for. The fact that these two guys, Morales and Drew, ended up getting the short end of the stick is almost certainly their fault. I don't know what offers were received prior to them signing the respective deals that they agreed to, but it certainly seems they both over shot their market. And part of the blame may go to Boras, but Morales and Drew have the final say what offer they accept. Boras owes his clients certain fiduciary responsibilities, one of them being obedience. Both Morales and Drew (and any other Boras client) could have instructed him to make a deal, or accept the qualifying offer. Instead, Morales and Drew got greedy, and they paid the price for their greed.

The same applies for Davis and Wieters. Many like to say that Davis and Wieters would never re-sign in Baltimore, to a team friendly deal or otherwise, because Boras wants the most money. In reality, Davis and Wieters want the most money possible, and Boras is just an agent with the reputation of being able to get it (the most money). Not once have I heard Davis or Wieters indicate that they would take a lesser deal to stay with Baltimore. Instead you have Davis saying he wants "to see what kind of commitments the team makes to winning" (aka show me the money).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No offense to you waroriole, not picking on you specifically, but I get so tired of seeing stuff like this about Boras. Drew and Morales are every bit as responsible as Boras for their situation(s) -- I would say that the most blame falls with the players themselves. Ultimately, it seems the qualifying offer was their biggest hindrance.

At the end of the day, the players make the decisions on where they play and what they play for. The fact that these two guys, Morales and Drew, ended up getting the short end of the stick is almost certainly their fault. I don't know what offers were received prior to them signing the respective deals that they agreed to, but it certainly seems they both over shot their market. And part of the blame may go to Boras, but Morales and Drew have the final say what offer they accept. Boras owes his clients certain fiduciary responsibilities, one of them being obedience. Both Morales and Drew (and any other Boras client) could have instructed him to make a deal, or accept the qualifying offer. Instead, Morales and Drew got greedy, and they paid the price for their greed.

The same applies for Davis and Wieters. Many like to say that Davis and Wieters would never re-sign in Baltimore, to a team friendly deal or otherwise, because Boras wants the most money. In reality, Davis and Wieters want the most money possible, and Boras is just an agent with the reputation of being able to get it (the most money). Not once have I heard Davis or Wieters indicate that they would take a lesser deal to stay with Baltimore. Instead you have Davis saying he wants "to see what kind of commitments the team makes to winning" (aka show me the money).

Good points. I agree that it is ultimately a player's decision about both his agent and his contract. At the same time, Scott Boras is not just someone who passively receives instructions from his clients about how to proceed. You don't achieve the first 50 million, first 100 million, first 200 million contracts without your own specific and often very public, very high wire type of strategy. He revels in his high profile status as "most powerful agent in sports" and he maintains an extraordinarily lucrative practice for himself, his corporation and his employees maintained by how much revenue he gets in commision from his clients contracts. I agree that players who do want the most contract often go with Boras but many do so as Mark Texiera did when he signed with Boras at age 18- in an unequal relationship. Texiera left Boras in 2011 and although publically cordial was quoted as saying he had become tired of reading about himself starting from his rookie year always as Mark Texiera, Scott Boras client, rather than just Mark Texiera. I agree that players are ultimately responsible but I also think Boras uses very psychologically powerful coercive techniques of persuasion to keep his clients on point with his negotiation strategies and that he would encourage clients to go elsewhere if they were not going to let him "do his job."

Boras often views himself as more powerful than most owners, certainly more powerful than the union leadership and his bombastic pronouncements, letters to the Commissioner about going back to a 1903 9 game World Series, etc, etc. are reflective of that belief system. He is a complex, unique force who has shaped the modern economics of baseball as much as any single individual except for Marvin Miller. And he knows it, too.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Posts

    • Unless my math is off, that’s an .860 OPS for Cowser and .835 for Westburg. I’d take that any day. I think it’s doable too.    Cowser for ROY!
    • I’m thinking more about about their average performance over the next 5-6 years while under team control.
    • I certainly didn't expect: Putting up a 7-spot on Ragans Shutting them out on a Cole Irvin start Nice to knock them down a peg. 
    • The O’s took the opening series of the year against the Angels 2 games to 1.  Since then, the Angels have gone 8-11, for a 9-13 overall record.  Looks like the pitching matchups will be:  Suarez (0-0, 0.00 ERA) v. Detmers (3-0, 1.19 ERA) Rodriguez (3-0, 2.63 ERA) v. Canning (0-3, 8.02 ERA) Kremer (0-2, 4.91 ERA) Anderson (2-2, 1.42 ERA) In the earlier series, the O’s knocked Canning around for 5 runs in 5 innings, while Detmer held the O’s to 1 run in 5 innings.  We didn’t see Anderson in that series; he’s made one past start, in 2023, allowing 3 runs in 5 innings.  Rodriguez bested Canning by holding the Angels to 1 run in 6 frames.   The Angels didn’t see Suárez or Kremer.  Kremer does have 3 lifetime starts against the Angels, and is 2-0 with a 1.76 ERA against them in 15.1 IP. The O’s come into this series scoring 5.85 runs per game, 2nd in MLB, while the Angels score 4.15, 17th.  Mike Trout is doing Mike Trout things (157 OPS+), supported by Taylor Ward (141), Miguel Sano (136) and Logan O’Hoppe (135), but the other starters have been dismal.   And surprise - Anthony Rendon has just gone on the IL.    The O’s will be facing the Angels’ best two starters so far in Detmers and Anderson, but the Halos’ bullpen has been a soft spot, sporting a 4.81 ERA.  The O’s pen has been shaky, but several notches above the Angels at 4.19.    Overall, this is a winnable series but our hitters will need to be on their game against the Angels’ two best starters.        
    • Same thing Gunnar did the winter before he took off.  How to flatten your swing on upper zone fastballs.  He’s uppercutting everything which is fine on the low and offspeed stuff but he’s consistently getting beat on high heat.  Another thing I mentioned in the off season is how he doesn’t stride towards the pitcher.  He opens up early which leaves him vulnerable to the outside corner.  I acquiesced to those who said it wasn’t a problem because he’s always gotten results.  Until now.
    • What about Detmers and Jose Soriano from Angels? Move Soriano to bullpen. Detmers has 3 more years control after this year.
  • Popular Contributors

×
×
  • Create New...