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GIDPs


Frobby

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Last year, we grounded into 112 double plays, while turning 127 of them.

This year, we've grounded into 90 double plays, while turning 76 of them.

The season is roughly 2/3 over, so we are on pace to hit into about 135 DP's and turn about 114. Not a good ratio, and a reversal from last year on both elements.

On defense, I think a lot is explained by the time Hardy and Schoop missed. There were a number of times I recall where we failed to turn a DP that formerly we would have turned, due to a poorly timed exchange or a relay throw that was accurate but not quite strong enough. Even Hardy looked a tad rusty when he first returned. I think those issues have resolved themselves.

On offense, it feels to me like we've killed a ton of rallies lately with GIDP's. Heck, I'd rather we strike out! Our best hitters have been a big part of this -- Jones with 15, Machado with 12. Pearce (9 in 193 PA) and Delmon Young (8 in 180 PA) were also big contributors. Davis, on the other hand, avoids DPs (only 4) by striking out instead. See, K's are not so bad!

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Last year, we grounded into 112 double plays, while turning 127 of them.

This year, we've grounded into 90 double plays, while turning 76 of them.

The season is roughly 2/3 over, so we are on pace to hit into about 135 DP's and turn about 114. Not a good ratio, and a reversal from last year on both elements.

On defense, I think a lot is explained by the time Hardy and Schoop missed. There were a number of times I recall where we failed to turn a DP that formerly we would have turned, due to a poorly timed exchange or a relay throw that was accurate but not quite strong enough. Even Hardy looked a tad rusty when he first returned. I think those issues have resolved themselves.

On offense, it feels to me like we've killed a ton of rallies lately with GIDP's. Heck, I'd rather we strike out! Our best hitters have been a big part of this -- Jones with 15, Machado with 12. Pearce (9 in 193 PA) and Delmon Young (8 in 180 PA) were also big contributors. Davis, on the other hand, avoids DPs (only 4) by striking out instead. See, K's are not so bad!

In Davis case it is also harder to gidp hitting into the shift.
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Last year, we grounded into 112 double plays, while turning 127 of them.

This year, we've grounded into 90 double plays, while turning 76 of them.

The season is roughly 2/3 over, so we are on pace to hit into about 135 DP's and turn about 114. Not a good ratio, and a reversal from last year on both elements.

On defense, I think a lot is explained by the time Hardy and Schoop missed. There were a number of times I recall where we failed to turn a DP that formerly we would have turned, due to a poorly timed exchange or a relay throw that was accurate but not quite strong enough. Even Hardy looked a tad rusty when he first returned. I think those issues have resolved themselves.

On offense, it feels to me like we've killed a ton of rallies lately with GIDP's. Heck, I'd rather we strike out! Our best hitters have been a big part of this -- Jones with 15, Machado with 12. Pearce (9 in 193 PA) and Delmon Young (8 in 180 PA) were also big contributors. Davis, on the other hand, avoids DPs (only 4) by striking out instead. See, K's are not so bad!

So GIDPs are subject to a lot of biases, like most defensive numbers. Most notably opportunities. I'd be interested in seeing how many GIDP opportunities the team has seen on both offense and defense, and how their totals and percentages compare to league averages. Once again I'll ask someone else to do the heavy lifting since bb-ref is dead to me here at work.

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It is odd that if you look at the Orioles batting lines compared to last year, they're remarkably consistent. Just few less line drives, a few more infield popups, and a bunch more GIDPs, and the league run rate is up a bit so it's not quite as valuable in context. Otherwise the team offensive totals look almost like they're dropped straight out of 2014. I think some of this is just timing an sequencing - more GBs happened to get hit with a guy on first.

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Last year, we grounded into 112 double plays, while turning 127 of them.

This year, we've grounded into 90 double plays, while turning 76 of them.

The season is roughly 2/3 over, so we are on pace to hit into about 135 DP's and turn about 114. Not a good ratio, and a reversal from last year on both elements.

On defense, I think a lot is explained by the time Hardy and Schoop missed. There were a number of times I recall where we failed to turn a DP that formerly we would have turned, due to a poorly timed exchange or a relay throw that was accurate but not quite strong enough. Even Hardy looked a tad rusty when he first returned. I think those issues have resolved themselves.

On offense, it feels to me like we've killed a ton of rallies lately with GIDP's. Heck, I'd rather we strike out! Our best hitters have been a big part of this -- Jones with 15, Machado with 12. Pearce (9 in 193 PA) and Delmon Young (8 in 180 PA) were also big contributors. Davis, on the other hand, avoids DPs (only 4) by striking out instead. See, K's are not so bad!

The pace for defensive double plays is 116, 11 off of our pace last year. Not a big reversal. That seems more like statistical noise than anything else.

Not sure about our offensive GIDPs, but it does seem like we are hitting into more and they are killing us. It's not like the guys we lost (Nick and Nelson) were super fast guys who were always beating out ground balls.

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I hate GIDP, to me, they are inning/rally killers. Like the dreaded LOB metric.

You lose 3-2 and you left 10 men on base, and you hit into 3 GIDP.

On the other hand, Drungo makes a very good point.

If you are hitting and getting on base, then you are going to GIDP opportunities.

Darn catch-22.

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So GIDPs are subject to a lot of biases, like most defensive numbers. Most notably opportunities. I'd be interested in seeing how many GIDP opportunities the team has seen on both offense and defense, and how their totals and percentages compare to league averages. Once again I'll ask someone else to do the heavy lifting since bb-ref is dead to me here at work.

League average is that teams GIDP in 11% of their opportunities. Last year our offense was at 10%, this year they're at 12% Last year our defense was at 12%, this year it's 11%. Doesn't sound like much, but a team has about 1100 DP opportunities a season, so 1% = 11 DPs.

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League average is that teams GIDP in 11% of their opportunities. Last year our offense was at 10%, this year they're at 12% Last year our defense was at 12%, this year it's 11%. Doesn't sound like much, but a team has about 1100 DP opportunities a season, so 1% = 11 DPs.

excellent perspective. Really does seem like noise.

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League average is that teams GIDP in 11% of their opportunities. Last year our offense was at 10%, this year they're at 12% Last year our defense was at 12%, this year it's 11%. Doesn't sound like much, but a team has about 1100 DP opportunities a season, so 1% = 11 DPs.

11 DP spread out over 162 games isn't much a blimp one way or another on the scale of things.

Does suck when you see it happen.

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I hate GIDP, to me, they are inning/rally killers. Like the dreaded LOB metric.

You lose 3-2 and you left 10 men on base, and you hit into 3 GIDP.

On the other hand, Drungo makes a very good point.

If you are hitting and getting on base, then you are going to GIDP opportunities.

Darn catch-22.

No I don't think it's a catch-22. Your original point was 100% correct. There's nothing more frustrating than when a player grounds into a double play. That's why I believe Craig Biggio's 1997 season when he went an entire season without grounding into a double play is one of the most impressive and greatest feats in the history of modern day baseball.

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Delmon Young was a GIDP machine earlier in the year. Oddly enough Machado and Jones are leading the team.

Why is that odd? GIDPs has to be pretty strongly correlated with quality of a hitter. Specifically, right-handed hitters who get a lot of at bats with runners on. All but a couple of the top 30 in all-time GIDPs have plausible HOF cases.

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