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Tylenol is a PED?


crawdad

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Ibupropherin appears to cause potential PED effect in geriatric patients by increasing muscle mass over the course of 3 months. I linked the site on my blog. I have no idea why or how it works.

I thought Tylenol's active ingredient is acetaminophen? Unless you meant ibuprofen, the active ingredient in Advil and Motrin. I'm not nit-picking, I swear. It's just I've been taking doses of both ibuprofen and Tylenol the last few weeks (broken wrist & tendon/ligament damage) and am wondering if I should go buy some bigger shirts! :D

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I thought Tylenol's active ingredient is acetaminophen? Unless you meant ibuprofen, the active ingredient in Advil and Motrin. I'm not nit-picking, I swear. It's just I've been taking doses of both ibuprofen and Tylenol the last few weeks (broken wrist & tendon/ligament damage) and am wondering if I should go buy some bigger shirts! :D

You don't have anything to worry about. I've taken more than my share of iboprofen and Tylenol for various soccer and softball injuries over the years and I'm still 145 pounds on a good day!

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I thought Tylenol's active ingredient is acetaminophen? Unless you meant ibuprofen, the active ingredient in Advil and Motrin. I'm not nit-picking, I swear. It's just I've been taking doses of both ibuprofen and Tylenol the last few weeks (broken wrist & tendon/ligament damage) and am wondering if I should go buy some bigger shirts! :D

Oops. The study included both from my understanding.

Sounds like a painful injury . . . hope it gets better quickly. You could always wear ponchos.

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You don't have anything to worry about. I've taken more than my share of iboprofen and Tylenol for various soccer and softball injuries over the years and I'm still 145 pounds on a good day!

I find it funny that there is actually more scientific data showing tylenol increases performance-related muscle mass than hGH.

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You don't have anything to worry about. I've taken more than my share of iboprofen and Tylenol for various soccer and softball injuries over the years and I'm still 145 pounds on a good day!

I have been taking ibuprofen for arthritis and lasix to reduce water retention. Recently, my feet became swollen to the point that my shoes didn't fit well. My doctor told me to switch to tylenol instead of ibuprofen because the ibuprofen counteracts the lasix. Unfortunately, tylenol is far less effective, at least for me.

Prednisone also promotes water retention, so I imagine that other steroids might have similar effects.

For geriatric patients who are skin and bones, I suppose that greater water retention in their muscles might have some beneficial effect, even if it didn't correspond to actually greater musculature?

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I wonder if MLB considers Viagra a PED? I mean...considering some of the side-effects of steroids.....:P

I doubt it. If a player is swinging a 32 inch "bat," I imagine you pass out from blood rushing out of your brain whenever you get excited. Hard to score like that.

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I wonder if MLB considers Viagra a PED? I mean...considering some of the side-effects of steroids.....:P

Don't the Olympics test for hair replacement drugs because they can be used to help mask steroids? I hope MLB doesn't get into testing for all those things. The Olympic testing is just too invasive and cumbersome if you ask me. At some point you have to just figure the expense and invasion of privacy are worse than the marginal increase in prevented cheating.

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Don't the Olympics test for hair replacement drugs because they can be used to help mask steroids? I hope MLB doesn't get into testing for all those things. The Olympic testing is just too invasive and cumbersome if you ask me. At some point you have to just figure the expense and invasion of privacy are worse than the marginal increase in prevented cheating.

I am afraid it will turn to that. Expense is really no issue with MLB with their record setting profits. Invasiveness? The public and congress seems generally outraged by any form of chemically enhanced "cheating." I do think the steroid guys will get into the hall, but current cheating is not so kindly looked upon.

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I am afraid it will turn to that. Expense is really no issue with MLB with their record setting profits. Invasiveness? The public and congress seems generally outraged by any form of chemically enhanced "cheating." I do think the steroid guys will get into the hall, but current cheating is not so kindly looked upon.

Great thread, crawdad!

When you say "the steroid guys" do you mean McGwire, Bonds, Palmeiro, and others under the PED microscope or just players from the era (Griffey, A-Rod, Jeter, etc.)?

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Great thread, crawdad!

When you say "the steroid guys" do you mean McGwire, Bonds, Palmeiro, and others under the PED microscope or just players from the era (Griffey, A-Rod, Jeter, etc.)?

I know a lot of people will disagree with me, but, yeah, I think McGwire, Bonds, everyone. As time goes on, we will learn more and more about how pervasive the use of these compounds are/were in MLB. We will also get guys into the Hall who used, but no one ever figured it out. To these people, the mark is not as bad as we, the fans, make it out to be. Does anyone get frothy about Gaylord Perry or John McGraw cheating? Not really. I also imagine that body modification will become more and more mainstream in the future. I imagine 100 years ago the concept of using bacteria to cure illness would have been considered fanciful and somewhat wrong. We don't think twice about using antibiotics. 100 years ago, breast enlargement would have been unheard of . . . but it is relatively common and not much harm is given to people who undergo it.

Times change along with what we tolerate. At least, this is my opinion.

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I know a lot of people will disagree with me, but, yeah, I think McGwire, Bonds, everyone. As time goes on, we will learn more and more about how pervasive the use of these compounds are/were in MLB. We will also get guys into the Hall who used, but no one ever figured it out. To these people, the mark is not as bad as we, the fans, make it out to be. Does anyone get frothy about Gaylord Perry or John McGraw cheating? Not really. I also imagine that body modification will become more and more mainstream in the future. I imagine 100 years ago the concept of using bacteria to cure illness would have been considered fanciful and somewhat wrong. We don't think twice about using antibiotics. 100 years ago, breast enlargement would have been unheard of . . . but it is relatively common and not much harm is given to people who undergo it.

Times change along with what we tolerate. At least, this is my opinion.

Good analogies.

As far as Gaylord Perry, John McGraw...it just goes to show you how twisted baseball fans are. Thinking of emory boards, sandpaper, and vaseline under the hat brim actually brings a smile to my face. There was a certain charm unique to baseball with that kind of cheating. I know it's not right and I'm guilty of some double standard, but I think you might be right. I doubt stars from this "Steroid Era" will necessarily be first-ballot entrants, but some may find themselves beneficiaries of forgiving fans and subsequently forgiving Hall of Fame voters.

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BA.   He hasn’t done much for Tampa, nor have the others. 11/30/21 Joey Wendle for Kameron Misner.   Wendle was coming off an all-star, 3.9 rWAR season, with two years of control remaining.   Misner had played in Hi A/AA the year prior to the trade.  He spent 2022 in AA. 4/5/22 Austin Meadows for Isaac Paredes.  Meadows had a 2.0 rWAR season for Tampa in 2021, and had been worth 6.2 rWAR after being acquired in the Archer deal at the 2018 trade deadline.   Tampa held Paredes in the minors for the first month of the season, and he ended the year with 1.160 years of service, while producing 1.9 rWAR in 111 games this year.  As you can see, Tampa has not hesitated to trade significant players.   Of these, only the David Price deal was a "last minute" deal at the trade deadline on the eve of free agency for the player.   Several of the players (Shields, Zobrist, Moore, Archer and Snell) had signed team-friendly extensions and were traded anyway.  Oftentimes, Tampa acquired players in 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