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Can we no longer say we can't grow arms?


bpilktree

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Doesn't a certain pitcher that is now considered one of the best in the Majors who was once an O and is now pitching in Chicago, kind of end this discussion?
That elite startingi pitcher, once an O, was developed by another Major League club after the O's completely mismanaged his development.
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That elite startingi pitcher, once an O, was developed by another Major League club after the O's completely mismanaged his development.

E-Rod is due to join the Red Sox rotation next month. If he has a good year, we might develop a reputation.

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Gausman and Carlos Rondon are the only two american league pitchers that were drafted in the last 4 years and starting in the majors for the team that drafted them.

This just tells me not to draft starting pitchers if you're an American League team. It's hard to believe. Like there's something wrong overall with minor league baseball.

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Gausman and Carlos Rondon are the only two american league pitchers that were drafted in the last 4 years and starting in the majors for the team that drafted them.

I mean I don't know why you limit it, b/c it still proves your point:

The Others since 2012 are Michael Wacha (NL), Lance McCullers (Dl'd to start season), Andrew Heaney (Dl'd right now), Jon Gray (Rockies NL), Aaron Nola (NL).

Regardless, I guess the O's did something right. Although there will be those that complain Gausman would have a Cy Young already if another franchise grabbed him.

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    • This team should go way past 1000 if Holliday or Mayo make the team out of OD.  The one thing that I feel people still overlook is that the Os have a lot of current players that just shouldn’t play everyday. We want to force these guys in the lineup a lot because “we like them” and they “have been through a lot”, etc… But at the end of the day, they just aren’t good enough players to play every day or they get banged up as a result of playing too much. It’s really as simple as that.     
    • Right.   I hope that happens before the end of ST but that’s probably a best case.
    • Until Bradish starts throwing off a mound  and how he progresses it is all just speculation.  Should have a much better idea after that.
    • I generally agree with this approach, and have said as much.   By the way, back in November I researched how many PA past Orioles contenders had given to rookies.   It varied a lot but there were five O’s contenders who gave rookies 1000+ PA, including last year’s team (1,073).   The 1960 Orioles gave 1,797 PA to rookies, topping the list.  
    • I don’t think you have to platoon as much as the team should just play a lot of different players until these guys establish themselves. Hays, Mullins and Santander’s days are numbered. Mountcastle is likely as well. But as you pointed out, it’s not guarantee the younger players just come in and outperform them(or as well) However, that doesn’t mean you don’t start playing these kids either. They don’t have anything left to prove in the minors (well maybe Holliday does..maybe) but the others don’t. Having them languish in the minors when they aren’t really being challenged isn’t that helpful either. So, do both. Have them up here and play 3-4 times a week. If they perform, they take more and more time away from the vets. If not, they keep working at it up here and the vets hold onto the majority of the playing time.  
    • I have nothing against platooning, it just doesn’t work as well as it did in the days of Roenicke and Lowenstein, for two reasons: 1.   The starting pitchers don’t pitch as long.  In 1983, starters averaged 6.3 IP/start; now it’s 5.1.    4.  Benches are shorter.   In 1983 teams had 14-15 position players on their roster and only 10-11 pitchers; now it’s usually 13 and 13,   So before, in a typical game you’d see start pinch hitting for platoon guys in the 7th inning if the other team started switching the handedness of the pitcher.  That was probably the only time that spot in the lineup would come up again, but if not, and the opponent switched the handedness of the pitcher again, there was still plenty of other bench bats to go to.   Roenicke/Lowensteib/Ayala, or Lowenstein/Roenicke/Dwyer.   But today, you’re having to switch out platoon guys in the 6th inning on average, guaranteeing that those batters will come up again later in the game, and you have fewer bench guys available to switch out in the late innings.   So, does this mean teams can’t make platoon?  No.  But they can’t do as much of it, and it isn’t as effective as it used to be.     
    • Hmmm.  I stand corrected. 
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