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anyone else not sold on Sherrill as closer?


DocJJ

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But if you can't get a very good package for Sherrill the closer, you could say Sherrill the LOOGY is a decent consolation prize. Well, if you believed that LOOGYs were a worthwhile use of a spot on the roster.

I'd still try hard to deal him if he ends up with a bunch of saves this year.

No question about it...You don't trade him for the hell of it...His salary is low for the next few years.

But if Sherrill can be turned into an Adrian Gonzalez like prospect(ala Urbina a few years ago), then you must make that deal.

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I understand the Coors Field idea now with the lower air pressure equaling lower density equaling lower drag and there is evidence to back that up obviously. But the humidity comments confuse me.

You seem to be saying that a ball won't take on moisture in a humid environment for whatever reason, not sure I buy that. At Coors the players were saying that the balls were so dry that the leather would crack. That quote from the one and only Dejean. Did they store their balls differently than the other teams before the humidor? Because a cracked ball indicates that it was affected by low ambient humidity. Maybe it's such an extreme park it should be excluded from the conversation altogether or maybe it proves the ambient humidity effects quite nicely. When looking at this same quote from Science of Baseball and speaking of parks not at high altitudes I see no reason to think there's a noticeable difference from park to park.

"The humidity, per se, has little effect on the ball's flight. Indeed, since water vapor is lighter than air, if all other factors are the same, a ball will travel slightly farther if the humidity is high. The humidity, however, effects the weight and elasticity of balls in storage. Balls stored under conditions of high humidity will gain some weight...and their elasticity will be reduced."

This seems to be a statement on ballparks in general. I can't help but think that he's saying that it really doesn't matter unless the storage of the balls is extreme, like with Coors, in their case they are compensating for something other than humidity with humidity. No one else uses humidors so we have to assume all balls are stored the same. So, I guess I just don't see how there could be a huge difference between Seattle and Baltimore related to humidity, park size I can see. Besides, the Seattle area is the most humid area in the country. If we are to believe that high-humidity-makes-balls-go-further even under those storage circumstances that you stated, Seattle would have to be the king in that category. Granted, they play in a dome on rain days but the Orioles just make up their games on a non-rain day.

Oh, I didn't mean to make it sound like I understand all the in's and out's of this. I don't.

I didn't say the ball won't soak up humidity, I was only saying that it would take it a good while to do it. It's not some instantaneous thing.

As for the 2nd part, I was just questioning your assertion that the humidity's effect on the ball itself (in terms of it's moisture content) cancels out whatever the humidity is in the air at any given moment, that's all. Not saying it does or doesn't, only saying that there's a diff between acknowledging that both things have some effect vs. saying they cancel each other out, that's all. Maybe they do, I don't really know.

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I doubt he'll become a lights out, AS-caliber closer. But he'll be good enough to be a decent closer. Its really no different than being any other sort of reliever except for a very small percentage of players who can't handle it.

I still think we should look into moving him if he racks up a bunch of saves. Increase his value then sell high. I'd probably wait until the offseason rather than this July.

I agree but shouldn't we wait until we find out if Ray is healthy or if McCrory can handle the job. Why not next July?

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So, I guess I just don't see how there could be a huge difference between Seattle and Baltimore related to humidity, park size I can see. Besides, the Seattle area is the most humid area in the country. If we are to believe that high-humidity-makes-balls-go-further even under those storage circumstances that you stated, Seattle would have to be the king in that category. Granted, they play in a dome on rain days but the Orioles just make up their games on a non-rain day.

Summers in Seattle are less humid and cooler than those in Baltimore, or pretty much any city on the Atlantic. Also, the roof at Safeco Field doesn't seal the stadium; there's no heating or air conditioning of the playing field, so closing the roof doesn't have much effect on the heat or humidity of the air.

One of the key phrases in the Adair quotation you use is "if all other factors are the same". Temperature, air pressure (altitude), and humidity all have effects on the distance a ball will carry. The reason the Rockies store the balls in a humidor (for several weeks before use) is because it is the only variable they can change at a reasonable cost.

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I agree but shouldn't we wait until we find out if Ray is healthy or if McCrory can handle the job. Why not next July?
We certainly could know by the offseason if Ray is healthy (should be back this season, I think August) or if McCrory (or someone else, Sarfate, Hoey, Penn, Liz) can handle the role.

And even if we don't, if we get a good offer for him this offseason, we've got enough reasonable options that we can assume we'll be able to find someone to do a decent job of the role. And we really shouldn't even need a closer until 2010 anyway.

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I am not impressed with Sherrill as of late. He seems very hittable and gives up way too much. When the O's first got him I thought I'd want him around for a while, but if they can flip him for some prospects at the deadline I am certainly all for it.

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Sure, he's got 10 saves. But the few times I've watched him he seems awfully hittable. His bloated ERA underscores this.

He got pounded in a yankee game in a non save situation. Other than that pretty good. The blown save was that terrible weather game.

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I am not impressed with Sherrill as of late. He seems very hittable and gives up way too much. When the O's first got him I thought I'd want him around for a while, but if they can flip him for some prospects at the deadline I am certainly all for it.

To be fair, normally the hit to 3rd would be an out, and there should have been an out on the play at home plate, so it looked worse than it was.

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2007 Orioles = 13-31 in one-run games

2008 Orioles = 8-2 in one-run games

Good job George, you platypus-billed cap of a closer, you.

Tonight had me on the edge of my seat, but you got the job done. Tip o' the cap!

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You posted this AFTER he got out of that situation to get the save? WOW, talk about a tough crowd. He gave up a solid hit to Torii Hunter, a ball that typically is a DP to Anderson (Mora was right on the line or he catches it easily), and a slow roller fielder's choice. I'm not sure what you're expecting, but I was very happy with the way he pitched in that inning and this whole year.

I don't mind us trading him, but it shouldn't be for any reason except that we can get a huge haul for him.

Yep, fly ball tendencies are gonna get him in trouble. :D

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