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Craig Biggio to retire


raccoon2k

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Biggio has had a heck of a career, he's a no-doubt Hall of Famer, and he's apparently a good guy. But for at least the last year and a half he's probably not even been the best second baseman on the Astros. This year he's been playing almost every day to get to 3000 hits despite being something like the 500th-best hitter in the majors

He's not quite reached the late career Pete Rose level, but it's pretty clear he's been playing for personal glory instead of team wins and losses. If he wasn't a little hustling guy with dirt all over his uniform he'd probably be called out for this.

There are places for players who no longer have major league talent but want to keep playing baseball for a living. Such as Mexico, or Japan, or the Atlantic League, or the Northern League.

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Biggio has had a heck of a career, he's a no-doubt Hall of Famer, and he's apparently a good guy. But for at least the last year and a half he's probably not even been the best second baseman on the Astros. This year he's been playing almost every day to get to 3000 hits despite being something like the 500th-best hitter in the majors

He's not quite reached the late career Pete Rose level, but it's pretty clear he's been playing for personal glory instead of team wins and losses. If he wasn't a little hustling guy with dirt all over his uniform he'd probably be called out for this.

There are places for players who no longer have major league talent but want to keep playing baseball for a living. Such as Mexico, or Japan, or the Atlantic League, or the Northern League.

Ouch.

I think that is more than a little harsh on Biggio. The 'Stros were contenders last year and thought to have a shot in the marginal NL Central this year. Could Biggio have been holding on for another playoff run?

And besides, I thought all sabermatricians loved the guy. He was arguably one of the top 5 second baseman of all time - much more than a gritty, hustling, loveable player. He deserves a year send-off without criticism or benching (just remember how Ozzie Smith went out under LaRussa - awful.)

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Biggio has had a heck of a career, he's a no-doubt Hall of Famer, and he's apparently a good guy. But for at least the last year and a half he's probably not even been the best second baseman on the Astros. This year he's been playing almost every day to get to 3000 hits despite being something like the 500th-best hitter in the majors

He's not quite reached the late career Pete Rose level, but it's pretty clear he's been playing for personal glory instead of team wins and losses. If he wasn't a little hustling guy with dirt all over his uniform he'd probably be called out for this.

There are places for players who no longer have major league talent but want to keep playing baseball for a living. Such as Mexico, or Japan, or the Atlantic League, or the Northern League.

If he's the 500th best hitter in the majors, I wonder where Jay Gibbons ranks. Biggio has the better OPS in 2007.

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The list of Hall of Fame quality players who hung on a year or two too long is a lot longer than the list of players who didn't. I certainly won't begrudge Biggio his run at 3,000 hits.

I have a little bit of a problem with any player who's playing for personal reasons and hurting his team's performance on the field. This isn't Cal or Willie Mays just playing until their skills ran out because they loved the game and their teams probably didn't have anyone better. This is a guy playing every single day in a quest to get 3000 hits despite being one of the worst players in the league. The Astros moved Chris Burke to the outfield, traded Willy Taveras, basically reconfigured their roster so that Biggio could stay a regular past the point where his skills merited it.

Look, this isn't a huge deal. There are quite a few reasons unrelated to Biggio that the Astros aren't in contention. And Biggio did have a great career, although almost all of his HOF case was made prior to about 2001. He's just been hanging around, slowly piling up counting stats ever since.

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I have a little bit of a problem with any player who's playing for personal reasons and hurting his team's performance on the field. This isn't Cal or Willie Mays just playing until their skills ran out because they loved the game and their teams probably didn't have anyone better. This is a guy playing every single day in a quest to get 3000 hits despite being one of the worst players in the league. The Astros moved Chris Burke to the outfield, traded Willy Taveras, basically reconfigured their roster so that Biggio could stay a regular past the point where his skills merited it.

Look, this isn't a huge deal. There are quite a few reasons unrelated to Biggio that the Astros aren't in contention. And Biggio did have a great career, although almost all of his HOF case was made prior to about 2001. He's just been hanging around, slowly piling up counting stats ever since.

I agree. This is one of my biggest problems with the HOF. Why should guys have to play a few mediocre to bad seasons at the end of their careers in order to make the HOF? There are quite a few guys where I think those last few seasons of mediocre to bad play likely made the difference with the voters. We even do this with our advanced evaluation with WARP3. If a guy has a 10 WARP3 over the last 4 years, that shouldn't really make be much of a boom if any to his HOF case.

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I agree. This is one of my biggest problems with the HOF. Why should guys have to play a few mediocre to bad seasons at the end of their careers in order to make the HOF? There are quite a few guys where I think those last few seasons of mediocre to bad play likely made the difference with the voters. We even do this with our advanced evaluation with WARP3. If a guy has a 10 WARP3 over the last 4 years, that shouldn't really make be much of a boom if any to his HOF case.

I don't think Biggio has held on over the past several years strictly to pad his stats. I believe he loves being a MLB player. Giving up something you love, something you've done most of your life is hard to do. I don't believe for a moment that the only reason he's continued to play is to make a stronger HOF case for himself.

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I don't think Biggio has held on over the past several years strictly to pad his stats. I believe he loves being a MLB player. Giving up something you love, something you've done most of your life is hard to do. I don't believe for a moment that the only reason he's continued to play is to make a stronger HOF case for himself.

I'm not saying he stayed on just for that, I do think it influenced him though, and I can't really fault him for that. So I guess I don't totally agree with Drungo. My point is that what he's done in the past couple seasons has helped his case with the HOF voters, and it really shouldn't make a difference.

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I went to a game in Houston on Monday. They love Biggio in a Brooks/Cal/Unitas sort of way down there.

I don't begrudge Biggio for hanging on. I think a player has a very different perspective than those of us looking at his numbers. I'd think a guy like Biggio, while knowing he isn't an All-Star any longer, probably feels like he's a hot streak away from being very good again.

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