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Roger Clemens book - The Rocket That Fell To Earth


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Picked up a copy today for roughly half the cover price, and I've already read four chapters since getting my daughter to sleep.

Can already tell it's a good one. Compellingly written by Jeff Pearlman, so much so that I'm finding it difficult to put down.

Get yourself two copies!

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Picked up a copy today for roughly half the cover price, and I've already read four chapters since getting my daughter to sleep.

Can already tell it's a good one. Compellingly written by Jeff Pearlman, so much so that I'm finding it difficult to put down.

Get yourself two copies!

Was it written before or after the scandal?

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Was it written before or after the scandal?

The "Fell to Earth" part made me assume it was after, but I wasn't sure.

So I looked on amazon to see. Below is the the blurb from there:

He was supposed to be the next Nolan Ryan: Roger Clemens, the fearless, hard-nosed Texan with a 98-mph fastball and a propensity to throw at the heads of opposing hitters. Yet shortly after his arrival in the major leagues in 1984, it became apparent that the Ryan comparisons were simply unfair—Roger Clemens was significantly better.

Over 24 seasons, the Rocket would go on to win 354 games, an unprecedented seven Cy Young Awards and two World Series trophies. In 1986 he set the major league record with 20 strikeouts in a nine-inning game, then matched it a decade later. He would be routinely praised for representing the game in a just and righteous manner—a living, breathing example of the power of determination and hard work. "Roger Clemens," a teammate once said, "is an American hero."

But the statistics and hoopla obscure a far darker story. Along with myriad playoff chokes, womanizing (including a 10-year affair with then-teenage country singer Mindy McCready), a violent streak (most famously triggered by former Mets star Mike Piazza) and his use of steroids and human growth hormones, Clemens has spent years trying to hide his darkest secret—a family tragedy involving drugs and, ultimately, death.

The author of the New York Times bestsellers Boys Will Be Boys and The Bad Guys Won!, Jeff Pearlman conducted nearly 500 interviews with Clemens' family, friends and teammates to present a portrait that goes beyond the familiar newspaper stories and magazine profiles. Reconstructing the pitcher's life—from his childhood in Ohio to college ball in Texas and on to the mounds of Fenway Park and Yankee Stadium—Pearlman reveals the real Roger Clemens: a flawed and troubled man whose rage for baseball immortality took him to superhuman heights but ultimately brought him crashing to earth.

Holy smokes!

Sex. Drugs. Violence. Even a deep dark family secret about drugs and death.

Sounds like it's got everything a made-for-TV movie would want.

And I thought he was just a pitcher. Silly me.

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Was it written before or after the scandal?

The book takes the reader up to January 2009 in the final chapter, so its about as up-to-date as can be.

Not even sure if its officially out yet, but if not, it will be very shortly.

Ever since the time the Orioles KO'd Clemens early at Memorial Stadium and he took off jogging through the streets of Baltimore (which is mentioned), I had a fierce admiration for Clemens the pitcher. I still do.

The book is quite damning with regards to the steroids/PED issue, but actually made me more sympathetic to Clemens in a way (though I don't think that was Pearlman's intention). It's not a one-sided slam job by any means, but Rocket's imperfections are on full display (we've all got 'em).

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