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Colin Cowherd bashes O's fans for Tex boo's


isestrex

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This really doesn't factor into my opinion on the topic of this thread. If I offered someone a job in my company and they stood me up for another company, I'd be annoyed, and I'd lose respect for them, and I wouldn't try to hire them again, and I wouldn't want to have them over for dinner, and I might even guiltily and secretly wish them failure at their company of choice, but I wouldn't want to see their family shamed or their life ruined. Hell, I wouldn't boo them in the street. There's a mindless war mentality in sports that is pretty nauseating and it has a real potential to hurt people. It really is just a game.

How did we get from booing to physical harm and humiliation to his family?

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hate

   /heɪt/ [heyt], hat⋅ed, hat⋅ing, noun

–verb (used with object)

1. to dislike intensely or passionately; feel extreme aversion for or extreme hostility toward; detest: to hate the enemy; to hate bigotry.

2. to be unwilling; dislike: I hate to do it.

–verb (used without object)

3. to feel intense dislike, or extreme aversion or hostility.

–noun

4. intense dislike; extreme aversion or hostility.

5. the object of extreme aversion or hostility.

From dictionary.com.

I intensely and with a great deal of passion dislike Mark Teixeira. I don't feel like causing harm upon him or his family. But I still fulfill the requirements for the textbook definition of the word "hate."

I hate Mark Teixeira. I hate the Yankees. I have a great deal of passion as a fan. There's nothing wrong with using the word "hate." You don't want to have to kill someone or hurt someone to hate them.

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Can you explain why Tex signed with the Yankees before allowing the Angels and Orioles to place any final offers?
Based on everything we've read about Tex, his strongest emotional connection lies not with the Orioles, but rather with the Yankees. Combine that with the money offer from the Yankees -- which Tex and his agent concluded based on prior discussions with the respective teams was not going to be topped by either the Angels or Orioles -- and you can then see that he did the classy thing by NOT playing out the situation any further with those two teams. I give him and yes, even the much-hated Boras, credit for the way they conducted the negotiations in this case.
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Based on everything we've read about Tex, his strongest emotional connection lies not with the Orioles, but rather with the Yankees. Combine that with the money offer from the Yankees -- which Tex and his agent concluded based on prior discussions with the respective teams was not going to be topped by either the Angels or Orioles -- and you can then see that he did the classy thing by NOT playing out the situation any further with those two teams. I give him and yes, even the much-hated Boras, credit for the way they conducted the negotiations in this case.

Then you should see the problem a lot of people have with some of his contradictary statements about his loyalties as a fan.

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Then you should see the problem a lot of people have with some of his contradictary statements about his loyalties as a fan.
Let's be realistic, BTerp. Did you really expect him to diss Baltimore and its fans? Of course he would say nice things about the city and fans in each of the respective towns that came a courting. It would be foolish to do otherwise from a business perspective during the course of the pursuit/negotiations -- and furthermore, it's the gentlemanly thing to do to say nice things about each suitor. Self-interest and good social behavior converge in this particular case. He did nothing wrong other than break a lot of fans' hearts in the natural course of a process in which this kind of thing is inevitable.
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If Tex had gone to the Chicago White Sox, or the Anaheim Angels, or the Dodgers, or the Mariners or any other team it would not have been as big a deal.

But the Yankees bought him. They never seemed to be involved, really and then in the last second they swoop in a buy him. Tex should get booed mercilessly by Red Sox fans as well, the way his agent jerked them around during their "negotitations". Let's face it. Tex used the Orioles, Nationals and Red Sox as tools to get the Yankees involved and the second they got involved he took the money and ran.

Now, do I blame him for taking the money? Not at all. I can not sit here and say that I could easily turn down an extra 30 million dollars, or how ever much it was. But then he has to take it.

This whole controversy is such BS: NEWSFLASH - BASEBALL FANS REACT NEGATIVELY TO A MEMBER OF ANOTHER TEAM.

Yankee fans sure were classy last night during their loss. I spell out Orioles and Yankee fan behind me calls me all sorts of names that can not be repeated here up to and including derogatory terms for a person's sexual orientation and someone with an Oedipal complex. I went to get beer and they tried to steal my sign. The usher got it back and kicked them out.

Kornheiser and Wilbon were right. We were right. And Yankee fan can kiss the palest part of my butt.

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Let's be realistic, BTerp. Did you really expect him to diss Baltimore and its fans? Of course he would say nice things about the city and fans in each of the respective towns that came a courting. It would be foolish to do otherwise from a business perspective during the course of the pursuit/negotiations -- and furthermore, it's the gentlemanly thing to do to say nice things about each suitor. Self-interest and good social behavior converge in this particular case. He did nothing wrong other than break a lot of fans' hearts in the natural course of a process in which this kind of thing is inevitable.

There's a difference between "dissing" the fans and using the hometown thing to drive up his price. He did the latter.

I don't recall him saying anything at all about Washington. He didn't mention any hometown connection to them. He used the O's to drive up the price. He used the other teams involved in a similar matter, but you're foolish if you think that it doesn't sting more for O's fans because he played on the hometown connection.

I'm sure a lot of guys would do the same thing in that situation. As many others have said though, "It's not what he did, it's how he did it."

I'm not really sure why you're even up in arms about this. It's not like O's fans went over the top. It's not like him or his family are getting death threats. He got booed, and there were signs stating our hatred of him. I'll guarantee you that he'll get it just as bad in Boston, if not more malicious. If he signed with the Mets, he'd get it worse in Philly as well. He was booed passionately. As long as there's no bodily harm threatened, I'm proud of how we treated him yesterday.

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There's a difference between "dissing" the fans and using the hometown thing to drive up his price. He did the latter.

I don't recall him saying anything at all about Washington. He didn't mention any hometown connection to them. He used the O's to drive up the price. He used the other teams involved in a similar matter, but you're foolish if you think that it doesn't sting more for O's fans because he played on the hometown connection.

I'm sure a lot of guys would do the same thing in that situation. As many others have said though, "It's not what he did, it's how he did it."

So he used the hometown thing to drive up the price? But he also failed to return to the hometown team to ask for a Best and Final Offer in an effort to drive up the price to the team that he wanted to sign with all along, which clearly was the Yankees. This is kind of like John Kerry saying he voted for the $87 billion before he voted against it.
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The Playmaker's on 1057 just destroyed Cowherd. Ken said he used to work with Colin in Portland or something like that and, basicly said Cowherd doesn't know anything about baseball. He also said he and Colin got into an argument about who was more important defensively Tony Gwynn or Cal freakin Ripken. Obviously we know who was argueing the latter...:rolleyes:

How can you possible argue RF is more important than SS?:confused:

Wow I definitely wish there was a link to that :(

I would love to hear someone bashing Colin for his views on baseball. To Colin, baseball is very very low on the totem poll for sports. He'd rather talk about half a dozen other things.

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So he used the hometown thing to drive up the price? But he also failed to return to the hometown team to ask for a Best and Final Offer in an effort to drive up the price to the team that he wanted to sign with all along, which clearly was the Yankees. This is kind of like John Kerry saying he voted for the $87 billion before he voted against it.

Except that it's not at all like that, but sure. You nailed it. You probably might watch bringing up anything political, too. ;)

I never said that he should've come back and asked for a best and final offer. What I'm saying is that he used the O's to drive up the price. What hurts us about it is that he purposely played up the hometown angle to did it. You don't have to say or insinuate that playing for the Orioles would be a dream come true or an awesome situation for you when, in reality, all you wanted to do all along was be a Yankee.

Yeah, I get that it's business and that's what he's supposed to do. And maybe I'm even being a little myopic to think that he would've spurned all that to do his home town fairly. But you clearly don't get that it's a normal fan reaction, especially in his home town, to be bitter and angry about getting used like that. And the reaction hasn't been over the top or violent. So you're having a problem with pretty much nothing.

Think Boston's going to treat him the same way? I do. He used them in the same manner. And he's not from anywhere near Boston. But he'll get just about the same reaction that he got here. That's just a part of being a passionate sports fan. You're going to give it to the players that you perceive stuck it to you or stabbed you in the back in some way.

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Sorry for piling on so late, but I haven't had a chance and did want to comment on this.

There are two quotes I want to incorporate to further my point. The first is from Rosenthal:

"Orioles fans had no rational reason to boo Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira on Monday, unless you believe that a free agent should give his hometown team a $30 million discount and ignore that team's 11 straight losing seasons."

The second is from Heyman:

"Teixeira, the native Marlyander, and third member of the Yankees' offseason haul, was dissed and hissed here for no good reason. As he said about his call to go to the rival Yankees for more money ($180 million) and a better October chance, 'I think anybody in my position would have done the same thing.' "

I disagree with the idea that it is unacceptable to dislike Teixeira because he took more money. I disagree that anybody in his position would have done the same thing. I must admit that I don't know exactly all details of his position, but I think we've all got an idea that's close enough.

First, many people in our country choose professions, callings and jobs that do not offer them the most financial reward. I'm not the only person who has turned down jobs that offered greater financial reward than what I have currently, or than what I had at the time I turned them down. It's disrespectful to the values of those who aren't driven by money to assert that everybody would have done what he did. That is simply not true. The opposite of what he did happens all the time. It's simply a different system of priorities. In my situation, the money wasn't the most important factor. In fact, the money in two cases was the only factor that would have compelled me to disregard my other values. Money itself is not bad, but its ability to sway values, to corrupt principals held more purely, can rightfully be regarded as bad, if not evil. Why else are the Yankees called "The Evil Empire"? Money makes people corruptible.

Second, what so many sports columnists have completely missed, including Schmuck, who showed again that he's not a Marylander (or, at the least, an East Coaster not from NY), is the strong pull this area has on people. I love Maryland and it is vital to my identity. That is personal, though, and I know it's not universal to every Marylander.

In the case of Teixeira, absent of the double talk, what he showed was that he does not have the same values as me. As a Marylander, who grew up loving the Orioles, I find it impossible not to want to be an Oriole if given the chance. I just cannot fathom that. It's not wrong that he choose the Yankees, it's just a rejection of local identity. Teixeira's decision displayed that his ties to this area, and all that it is, are not as strong as I imagine my own to be. Furthermore, based on what I know of myself, and having previously turned down more lucrative job offers, I can state with near 100% certainty that I would have given the Orioles a $30 million hometown discount. I don't even find myself incredible making that statement. Furthermore, while not on the same scale, other major league players have turned down more lucrative offers to play for the teams they wanted. The first that comes to mind is Konerko. The second is Vlad, who wasn't going to take the Orioles' money no matter what.

Therefore, I find it totally within reason to dislike Teixeira for selling out and for choosing the Yankees (which, at the least, was a situation people must acknowledge he contrived). In fact, I think it's appropriate.

The only reason of the many different and sometimes conflicting ones which Teixeira has given for his decision that I can bring myself to believe is that he wanted to compete. I find this one, too, however, a weak reason. Boras is clearly not ignorant of every organization. Most of us are certain that the Orioles will compete soon. It's not a guarantee, but it's also not a guarantee that that Yankees will either. I personally like our chances more than the Yankees after this season. So, considering everything, I'm not judging Tex as bad or wrong for choosing the Yanks, but it's clear to me that he never had the same values, which is fine. He's not hurting anyone really. He is now, though, a member of the team I earnestly enjoy disliking and I will boo him mercilessly every time I can, but I boo all of them anyways.

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You know what is so weak with Rosenthal and Heyman and many other national reporters is that they keep pointing to this notion that Tex took more money to go to NY. While teams like Ana, Bal and Bos never had a chance to counter the offer. So please stop using this tired excuse of "who wouldn't take more money" crap. When AM made it clear that the 7-140 was an initial offer. And you know the Nats were willing to throw more or equal money there. The guy wanted to be a Yankee. Plain and simple. And when he got the money he wanted, he signed the deal.

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