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York Revolution Invite 3'2" player to be ultimate on-base machine


DrungoHazewood

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What if the opposing pitcher is throwing a perfect game and this kid comes up to the plate and walks?

What if basketball teams starting hiring freaks over 7 feet tall who could just reach up and drop it in?

Same basic thing: using size to give an unfair advantage in one dimension of the game.

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There is just something that isn't right. I guess it isn't that big of a deal. Only thing that bugs me if this dude can't handle getting hit by a pitch and therefore is risking more than other players for simply walking once a game.

If he is risking more than other players for simply walking once a game, that is his decision to make. He'll be offered a contract and told what is expected of him. If he thinks he's risking too much for what they're offering, he won't accept.

Another interesting possibility: There are multiple injuries and they have to put this dude in the field.

This would factor into the team's risk assessment. The team would have to weigh the pros and cons of carrying a player whose only purpose is to draw one walk a game. If they decide use a roster spot on a no-hit, no-defense player, they must be prepared to deal with situations like this. Again though, this should be a decision for each individual team to make.

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Actually I considered that before I posted.

My thought process went something like, "What if I was precluded from playing a game because people thought my physical limitations either made it too dangerous for me to play, or that I couldn't play the game in the traditional way?

Would it be worth it to get into a game, knowing I would never hit, never pitch, never play the field, never run the bases, never throw anybody out...but would have the opportunity to stand in the batter's box and try to get a walk?

Would the thrill of playing at a level that most people never see be worth it to be used in such a fashion?"

And I'm not even considering the chance of injury, which as I've said several times, I think is more likely for little people, but I'm really not at all sure.

I don't see the upside for the little person, who imho isn't really getting to play the game if all he is expected to do is stand still in the batter's box and try to get a walk. I guess I see the upside for the team, since they get one guy on base each and every game. But, again, it appears to me to be contrary to the spirit of the game and how it was meant to be played (which is a whole other argument!)

I appreciate your sincere belief that anybody should be given the chance to follow a dream and that others shouldn't act as if they know better and make decisions for them. But I also think you're exaggerating the fun and possible cash to be made, and underestimating the danger, how it would feel to be standing out there as a sort of spectacle, and the feelings of the fellow who didn't make the team so that they could instead run out the little person once a game.

No easy answer here.

This is a well thought out and level headed answer. Fair enough.

I would say that, yeah, you'd have to be a little bit crazy as a little person to get out there in front of 90+ MPH fastballs and risk significant injury to play a game. In the same way, you'd have to be a little bit crazy to be a professional boxer, football player, rugby player, etc.

Your personal risk assessment system may deem it too dangerous, and I probably wouldn't have the guts to do it either.

But, in the end, there is at least one player who is willing to do it professionally, and who sees the personal upside. I'd be willing to bet that there are many others too. So the paternalistic exclusion of little people seems groundless to me. Everything else you're saying makes sense to me and they are good points, but I don't see a real justification for systematically keeping little people out of the game.

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What if basketball teams starting hiring freaks over 7 feet tall who could just reach up and drop it in?

Same basic thing: using size to give an unfair advantage in one dimension of the game.

Terrible example.

The seven-foot freaks still have to get the ball in the basket while going against other seven-foot freaks, and the more-normal-sized players still have their shot.

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What if basketball teams starting hiring freaks over 7 feet tall who could just reach up and drop it in?

Same basic thing: using size to give an unfair advantage in one dimension of the game.

Not at all. This guy is going to go to the plate once a game. That is it. He will do nothing else for the team.

In basketball these 7 foot tall freaks actually have to be pretty good with other aspects of the game or they will not last long.

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