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NY Times: Was Tejada tipping pitches in 2001?


hobokenPauli

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Very interesting Ny Times article about a blow-up in the Oakland A's clubhouse in 2001. Players accuse tejada of tipping pitches to opposing team during blow-outs. What's interesting is this: tejada lied about his age, lied about steroids and here he is being accused by Oakland players of something completely different before any of that came out.

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Very interesting Ny Times article about a blow-up in the Oakland A's clubhouse in 2001. Players accuse tejada of tipping pitches to opposing team during blow-outs. What's interesting is this: tejada lied about his age, lied about steroids and here he is being accused by Oakland players of something completely different before any of that came out.

Nothing would surprise me with Baseball anymore. Tejada cheating to inflate his stats? I wont belive it!!!:rolleyes:

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Not saying I believe it, but what would be the motivation to do something like this? Just to get the game over with?

There is a new book out written by a kid from Yale who pitched for one year in the minors in the Angels system. He washed out after one year and became a doctor, and a few years later he wrote this book about his experience. It's really good, sort of a Ball Four about life in the low minors.

In the book, one thing he describes is the complete segregation of the team in terms of Latino players vs American players. The Latino players (who the Americans all call "Dominicans" regardless of where they are actually from) all go into the shower first and the Americans don't get in until they are done. The American players got to live with nice host families in the upper middle class area of Provo Utah where the book took place, but the Latino players shared hotel rooms four or five guys apiece.

And one thing he mentioned was the all the American players were convinced that a "Dominican" catcher would tip off a "Dominican" batter on the the other team as to what type of pitch was coming, and not just in blowouts.

Take it FWIW.

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what I find interesting is that tejada represented a very serious financial commitment by the Baltimore Orioles in 2004. What did the other teams know about tejada's reputation during his free agency in 2004. Is this the reason, or part of the reason, why teams like Boston and LAA passed on tejada? Is the type of player who, gulp, falls to Baltimore.

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Wasn't there a story earlier in the year about ARod doing exactly the same thing during blowouts? He would somehow signal to opposing hitters which pitch was coming, with the understanding that they would do the same for him.

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And one thing he mentioned was the all the American players were convinced that a "Dominican" catcher would tip off a "Dominican" batter on the the other team as to what type of pitch was coming, and not just in blowouts.

Take it FWIW.

This seems a little ridiculous to me, but then again I've never played professional baseball. What's the name of the book?

I've given out all my rep, but I'll try to remember to hit you up when I get my next allotment.

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Wasn't there a story earlier in the year about ARod doing exactly the same thing during blowouts? He would somehow signal to opposing hitters which pitch was coming, with the understanding that they would do the same for him.

Yeah, it happened right when he came back from his injury. Around early May.

I haven't heard any updates/changes to that story. It pretty much died...

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Anyone find it amusing that the Times is calling someone out for not checking their facts or making something up?

The real meat of the article is...there was a problem in Oakland A's clubhouse. As to what that problem was on a factual basis, there is very little to go on other than "he said-ss said" stuff. My guess is the article wouldn't have made it past the Times editorial desk had it not been for Tejada's other lies: steroids and age fraud. He is a known serial liar, that's a fact. And where there's smoke, there's fire...

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The real meat of the article is...there was a problem in Oakland A's clubhouse. As to what that problem was on a factual basis, there is very little to go on other than "he said-ss said" stuff. My guess is the article wouldn't have made it past the Times editorial desk had it not been for Tejada's other lies: steroids and age fraud. He is a known serial liar, that's a fact. And where there's smoke, there's fire...

I was refering to calling out the author for writing the book of his life in the minor leagues. Not for the Tejada issue.

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The real meat of the article is...there was a problem in Oakland A's clubhouse. As to what that problem was on a factual basis, there is very little to go on other than "he said-ss said" stuff. My guess is the article wouldn't have made it past the Times editorial desk had it not been for Tejada's other lies: steroids and age fraud. He is a known serial liar, that's a fact. And where there's smoke, there's fire...

Was there a problem in the clubhouse when Tejada won the MVP for Oakland? Or the other three times they went to the playoffs while Tejada was there?

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