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Trembley on "Average 3Bman" RBIs


Arthur_Bryant

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Haven't seen this elsewhere, but Roch Kubatko quotes Dave Trembley setting a high bar for a new 3Bman:

"You've got to have somebody who can knock in runs. Same thing for your guy at first base or left field. They've got to be guys who knock in runs, and it's not 65 or 75, it's got to be 90 or 100. Really, that's average, isn't it, what everybody else is doing in the big leagues? You've got to have it."

Maybe it seems that way when you're playing in the AL East, but in fact:

1) Longoria 113 RBI

2) Zimmerman 106

3) Reynolds 102

4) A. Rodriguez 100

5) Sandoval 90

6) Kouzmanoff 88

7) Inge 83

8) Peralta 83

9) Feliz 82

10) Blake 79

In fairness, David Wright is usually near the top of that list. And getting a combined 90 or more is a little easier, of course.

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The average AL team got 81 RBI at 3B. We got 67. The average AL team had 33 2B and 19 HR at 3B. We had 26 and 14. Trembley may be a little off on his numbers, but his point was correct -- we need more power and more RBIs at 3B than we got in 2009.

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And of course he realizes that RBI is highly dependent on the batters in front of you, as well, right?

I wish he would talk about looking for certain skill sets and not certain arbitrary stat markers. But, whatever. His job is to handle the team, not to come up with a plan for building a successful organization. As long as these are being dropped in the AM idea box for serious consideration, it's just a manager talking shop and a reporter filling-up inches.

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I think I've found the perfect quote for when we get into RBI debates:

“That’s not true. With RBIs, yes. Based on his skill set, he’s always going to have underwhelming RBI totals. I couldn’t care less. When you’re putting together a winning team, that honestly doesn’t matter. When you have a player who takes a ton of walks, who doesn’t put the ball in play at an above average rate, and is a certain type of hitter, he’s not going to drive in a lot of runs. Runs scored, you couldn’t be more wrong. If you look at a rate basis, *Name Withheld* scores a ton of runs.

“And the reason he scores a ton of runs is because he does the single most important thing you can do in baseball as an offensive player. And that’s NOT MAKE OUTS. He doesn’t make outs. He’s always among our team leaders in on-base percentage, usually among the league leaders in on-base percentage. And he’s a really good base runner. So when he doesn’t make outs, and he gets himself on base, he scores runs — and he has some good hitters hitting behind him. Look at his runs scored on a rate basis with the *Team Withheld* or throughout his career. It’s outstanding.

“You guys can talk about RBIs if you want, I just … we ignore them in the front office … and I think we’ve built some pretty good offensive clubs. If you want to talk about RBIs at all, talk about it as a percentage of opportunity but it’s just simply not a way or something we use to evaluate offensive players.”

Name the individual quoted...

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Figgins was the 3rd most valuable 3b in the entire league this year.

He had 5 hrs and 54 RBIs.

It goes to show that if you're not hitting for the average third-baseman numbers, you better be doing what Figgins is doing

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i think i've found the perfect quote for when we get into rbi debates:

Name the individual quoted...

Can't be anybody who would make a decent manager :) Any good manager knows to ignore those stats things and focus and grit, wanting-it, and having guys who are winning players on his roster.
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Currently one of the best GMs in the game -- Theo.

We have a winner!

You know, the guy running one of the two teams we're trying to catch. Talking about J.D. Drew to radio-show hosts complaining about (obviously) his lack of RBIs.

I have a feeling that MacPhail tends to think more in these terms (even if not necessarily in the all-out way guys like Epstein and Beane and others in and around the sport do) than in the specific We-Need-RBI-Guys manner.

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The average AL team got 81 RBI at 3B. We got 67. The average AL team had 33 2B and 19 HR at 3B. We had 26 and 14. Trembley may be a little off on his numbers, but his point was correct -- we need more power and more RBIs at 3B than we got in 2009.

I agree with DT as 67 is terrible. Heck, Tony Batista used to regularly put up 90 rbi and 25-30 dingers when he played third. He played on some lousy Oriole teams too. He wasn't as good as Mora defensively but at least he had some power and knocked in some runs.:(

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We have a winner!

You know, the guy running one of the two teams we're trying to catch. Talking about J.D. Drew to radio-show hosts complaining about (obviously) his lack of RBIs.

I have a feeling that MacPhail tends to think more in these terms (even if not necessarily in the all-out way guys like Epstein and Beane and others in and around the sport do) than in the specific We-Need-RBI-Guys manner.

Lol. I still bet he regrets that contract.

Point taken though.

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I agree with DT as 67 is terrible. Heck, Tony Batista used to regularly put up 90 and 25-30 dingers when he played third. He wasn't as good as Mora defensively but at least he had some power and knocked in some runs.:(

It's too bad his OBP was around .300. He certainly had a lot of power.

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