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How old do you feel...


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I said in the game thread that it's just so sad to watch Griffey swing the bat nowadays.

I idolized Junior in the mid 90's as a kid and he might have the saddest career of any baseball player (even for someone with 600 home runs).

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I was two when he broke in and a kid when he was in his prime. The thing that make Griffey special to me was he was one of those few guys that pretty much every kid regardless of their favorite team liked rooting for and the other thing I'll always remember about Griffey is he just looked like he was having so much fun out there. My memories of him are mostly in the Home Run Derby's of the mid 90's with that beautiful swing he had. It's too bad he got hurt. He really could have gone down as the best ever.

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I think it should be against the law to mention his age. And I'm not joking.

For some reason, even compared to a lot of other guys I grew up with who have retired, with him it just makes me feel sad.

I just read the Willie Mays book, and the description of the end of his career reminds me of Griffey. Not so much the decline in skills as the feeling that his career has a countdown and we all know when it is ending.

Just depressing.

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Its not so much that I feel old...well, it kinda is. But it's just sad to see his career going out like this. There's absolutely NO DOUBT he'd be the HR king if injuries didn't derail him.

I still remember one of the biggest thrills of my early photography career. I've posted it on here before but I'll post it again:

<img src = "http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b353/kidcruisin/IMG_5746.jpg">

Took that in high school, snuck down to the front row before the usher could kick me out...full on manual, no luxury of a digital. Flipping through some old journals a few years ago and that fell out, had my mom frame it for me for Christmas. That's my most favorite memory of him.

And the Pennington homer. I am absolutely amazed that he didn't hit the Warehouse on that one. Even when he destroyed us, I couldn't get mad. He was just that damn good.

I never got that 89 Upper Deck card...I didn't start collecting Upper Deck until 1990 for some reason. I still don't have it and I refuse to buy it. The only way I'll get it is if I get it through a pack. So later this summer I'm gonna get on ebay, get a box of 89 Upper Deck and take my chances.

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Its not so much that I feel old...well, it kinda is. But it's just sad to see his career going out like this. There's absolutely NO DOUBT he'd be the HR king if injuries didn't derail him.

I still remember one of the biggest thrills of my early photography career. I've posted it on here before but I'll post it again:

<img src = "http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b353/kidcruisin/IMG_5746.jpg">

Took that in high school, snuck down to the front row before the usher could kick me out...full on manual, no luxury of a digital. Flipping through some old journals a few years ago and that fell out, had my mom frame it for me for Christmas. That's my most favorite memory of him.

And the Pennington homer. I am absolutely amazed that he didn't hit the Warehouse on that one. Even when he destroyed us, I couldn't get mad. He was just that damn good.

I never got that 89 Upper Deck card...I didn't start collecting Upper Deck until 1990 for some reason. I still don't have it and I refuse to buy it. The only way I'll get it is if I get it through a pack. So later this summer I'm gonna get on ebay, get a box of 89 Upper Deck and take my chances.

I gave you positive rep for this photo. Great photo. He was just amazing to watch and he looked like was having so much fun doing it.

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I gave you positive rep for this photo. Great photo. He was just amazing to watch and he looked like was having so much fun doing it.

Thanks man.

He was in the on deck circle there, people kept trying to take his photo, telling him to turn around...so he'd take a swing and kinda look back, real quick...finally he turned around and just looked around and I was able to snap that photo.

IIRC, Piniella got kicked out of that game, started beefing with the third base umpire. And as he is/was prone to do, it got pretty heated. I was still in the same spot so I could look in the visitors dugout and Griffey couldn't contain himself, he was laughing so hard and talking to the crowd since part of the stands can look into the dugout.

That was 1997, he was at the peak of his powers, his MVP year. He was just so awesome to watch.

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