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Roy Halladay perfect through 7 (now airing on MLB Network)


O's are Legends

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I still can't believe MLB changed the rules and took his perfect game away 30-some years after it happened. It was more of a perfect game (36 batters) than anybody else's was. Not only that, but the other team knew what every pitch was gonna be (due to sign stealing) and still couldn't get a hit for 12 innings. Whenever they tell us how many perfect games there have been, I always add one for Haddix...

Agree, and let's not forgot Pedro Martinez of the then-Montreal Expos.

He pitched perfect baseball for nine innings on 6/3/1995 against the Padres, but the game went into extra innings because San Diego's Joey Hamilton was also hurling a shutout. Ex-Oriole (future Oriole at the time) Brian Williams relieved Hamilton and surrendered a run in the top of the 10th, but Martinez allowed a leadoff double to Bip Roberts in the bottom of the inning to break up the perfecto.

Mel Rojas relieved Pedro at that point and got the last three outs to preserve 1-0 victory.

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Interesting (to us O's fans...) that the Browns also tried to move (back?) there in '53 when it opened. They were just BANGIN to get out of St. Louis evidently. Even to Balmer. :P

When Bill Veeck bought the Browns, the Cards were in trouble and so was their owner. They didn't even have a ballpark, they rented the one the Browns owned. Veeck thought St Louis could only support one team, and he'd thought that, by making the Browns successful, he could drive the Cards out, leaving St Louis to the Browns. But then, right after he bought the team, the Cards were bought by the rich beer family, and Veeck immediately knew he was screwed. He was a working owner, it's how he made his living, he was not some rich guy who did it as a hobby, and he knew St Louis could support only one team, and he knew that team would not be his if the Cards had private wealth behind them. So, as soon as that happened, he started looking for a way to get out of St Louis.

Where he really wanted to go was LA, and he had a plan to do it, but his efforts were blocked by other owners, some of whom had their own agenda, others of whom just hated Veeck. His Plan B was Milwaukee, he had been successful there as owner of the MiL Brewers towards the end of the era when MiL teams were mostly independent operations, but the Braves owner beat him to it, it was his MiL team that was there so he had first dibs on the territory. BAL was his Plan C, but the owners vetoed that, and told him they would approve that move *only after* he sold the team to somebody else... so it took a year longer than it was supposed to. When he sold the Browns to a BAL consortium, the Cards bought the Browns' Sportsman Park from him for peanuts, because who else was he gonna sell it to?

Too bad he had to sell the Browns for them to become the O's, he was great as a team owner. Before the Browns, he had the MiL Brewers, they were lousy but he made them successful. Later, he was ready to buy the Phillies, and he was gonna stock them with players from the Negro Leagues and beat the hell out of everybody else (this is before Jackie) but Landis and the other owners wouldn't let him do that, so the league took over the Phillies to keep Veeck from getting them. Then, after the war, Veeck got the Indians, and they went to the WS soon after. Right after the Dodgers got Jackie, Veeck broke the color barrier for the AL by signing Larry Doby for CLE. After he sold the Indians, he bought the Browns but he didn't have a prayer there once the Busch family got the Cards. Later on, he got the CWS, and they went to the WS too.

The guy knew what he was doing... being a baseball team owner was his actual profession (he called himself a "team operator"). He would get attendance up via goofy things that sparked local interest, and he'd spend the whole game going through the stands, drinking beer and BS'ing with everybody about what they thought he should do. With attendance up, he would then use that income to strengthen the team. Everybody else thinks you get a good team first and then attendance follows, but Veeck did it backwards from that. There's nobody like him, before or since...

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Agree, and let's not forgot Pedro Martinez of the then-Montreal Expos.

He pitched perfect baseball for nine innings on 6/3/1995 against the Padres, but the game went into extra innings because San Diego's Joey Hamilton was also hurling a shutout. Ex-Oriole (future Oriole at the time) Brian Williams relieved Hamilton and surrendered a run in the top of the 10th, but Martinez allowed a leadoff double to Bip Roberts in the bottom of the inning to break up the perfecto.

Mel Rojas relieved Pedro at that point and got the last three outs to preserve 1-0 victory.

OK, thanks... I'll start adding 2 instead of 1... (really, I mean it).

Although I still think taking it away from Haddix is worse. It was a perfect game for 30-some years, and then suddenly one day it wasn't. At least with Pedro, they didn't change the rules on the guy after he did it. With Haddix it's almost the same thing as if they decided umps shouldn't call strikes on pitches that are low and 3" outside, and so they went back and took a bunch of K's and W's away from Maddux and Glavine that they got during their great ATL years. It's not quite that bad, but almost...

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When Bill Veeck bought the Browns, the Cards were in trouble and so was their owner...

Nice recap of Veeck's career.

For a couple of years, Veeck also had the Chicago White Sox, who won the pennant in 1959.

He introduced players' names to the back of uniform shirts, and fireworks at ballparks ("exploding scoreboard" at Comiskey).

He also conceived the Eddie Gaedel stunt.

I am pretty sure that Veeck was the direct inspiration for the innovations and antics of Charles O. Finley, who bought the A's in the 1960s.

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